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-   -   How do I shoot action with Canon G3 (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/canon-21/how-do-i-shoot-action-canon-g3-7173/)

Sassa Feb 18, 2003 10:58 AM

How do I shoot action with Canon G3
 


I have zero camera experience and need to know what settings to use to shoot action. Specifically, my dogs foot timing while being gaited. I know the automatic setting is no good for this. I think I should manually set the shutter speed and apeture, but how? Or is there a more 'automatic camera knows better' way? Much thanks.

TD27 Feb 18, 2003 4:10 PM

Sassa, you said: "Specifically, my dogs foot timing while being gaited." I'm afraid I don't know what that means.

Are you talking about taking still photos there, or movies (the "foot timing" makes me suspect you might be talking about movies)?

For still photos, you will want as high a shutter speed (or use flash) that the lighting conditions will allow. I'd suggest using the aperture priority mode and setting a large lens opening so that you get the highest shutter speed. That's the "Av" on the dial... then use the wheel in front of the shutter release to set the lens opening to the biggest (which is the smallest number).

I suspect a greater program will be getting the focus right... the G3 isn't the fastest out there for focusing. You might get better results by using manual focus and then having your dog walk by the spot you focused on.

Hope this helps...

Tim

Sassa Feb 18, 2003 6:12 PM

Foot timing is the timing at which each individual foot touches the ground, the placement of the feet. If you've ever seen a dog show, it's during the part where the handler runs with the dog. It will help to use continuous shooting. I am talking about photographs. Thanks in advance.

rkuite Feb 23, 2003 7:20 AM

I would try the Shutter Priority "TV" mode. This mode sets the aperture automatically but allows you to bumps up the shutter speed to stop the movement of the dogs legs. Focusing will improve the wider out you can stay and still get the composition you're after. Try focusing on the dogs troso in an area the provides good vertical contrast.

Keep shooting-
Randy


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