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Old Sep 29, 2006, 12:45 PM   #1
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i've been thinking lately about upgrading from my 30D to a 5D, to get the resolution needed to make large (24x36 +) prints. is upgrading the best way to approach this, or could i accomplish the same thing with my 30D, by using some spiffy new interpolation program? i'm by and large very happy with the 30D, but i'm concerned that it may lack resolution for really large prints, which a commercial partner of mine wants me to provide. i've heard good things about the 5D, but it's a fair piece of change, and i'd prefer not to go into hock to get it, if i can achieve the same result with my 30D...
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Old Sep 29, 2006, 12:53 PM   #2
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Check out genuine fractals 4.0 by OnOne Software.It is a photoshop plug-in, but also works with photoshop elements too. You can get a free trial program from their website .
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Old Sep 29, 2006, 3:19 PM   #3
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If you have PhotoShop CS2 you can upsize in three stages if you need to, byincreasing the image size by 100% bicubic smoother, then increase size by another 100% bicubic smoother,and finally another50% bicubic smoother. A better way is to shoot raw and use the CS2 RAW feature to choose to enlargephotos to 12 or 16 megapixels to get the size you want. I would not buy a camera just to get the larger file size. I love the 5D, but you may find that your shooting style might actually get larger images (more resolution) especiallyif you shoot telephoto, since the 30D has an effective 1.6 multiplier compared to the 5D.
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Old Sep 29, 2006, 5:52 PM   #4
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i have PS 7.0, not CS...

i know about the 1.6 crop factor with the 30D. it might give me a more close-upview of the subject, but itwon't alter the resolution any... only more pixels will do that. i'd be using mostly landscape shots for these big prints anyway, so no telephoto. and on the 5D, the 1:1 crop ratio would let me use my 24-135 lens as a true wide angle, not a 38mm short telephoto.
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Old Sep 29, 2006, 9:47 PM   #5
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If you're shooting landscapes, the 5D is a very compelling option. I have the 20D and the landscape photos I've taken with the 5D are sharper because of the increased resolution. However, if you upsize using RAW or in PhotoShop in the manner I suggested you should be able to get very good to excellent quality photos using the 30D. You can use the image size option with 7.0 you just don't have the ability to upsize the RAW images with that version of PhotoShop. I thinkthat upsizing RAW images is comparable to using a program like geniune fractals to upsize your images.
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Old Sep 30, 2006, 3:49 AM   #6
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Firstly it depends on the kind of subject as to how much resolution is needed. Some photographs demand sharp detail and others can be blown up enormously without concern because detail is simply not important to how well the photograph works.

Also don't forget that with large prints viewing distance is often significantly greater than with smaller ones, so they don't need the same resolution.

However, there are times when you do want lots of detail in a big print.

I have tried PS bicubic interpolation and the trial of Genuine Fractals, on a 20D 8Mp image, and up to sizes of around A2 (16x24) could see very little difference in the results. I suspect it may depend somewhat on subject matter; under the right circumstances I'm sure GF will show its advantages, and for much larger print sizes may perform better.


Showing detail i.e. sharpness is also about more than just resolution, it is very much about contrast too.

So I would suggest you have a look into programs like Focus Magic, and also read up about Local Contrast Enhancement.

http://www.focusmagic.com/

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...ancement.shtml


There are also options to correct for the lens and camera combination

http://www.dxo.com/intl/photo


And that then brings us to sharpening itself, there are a wide range of options, the basic USM in the version of PS that you are using is very difficult to use effectively. At the least I would suggest using an add-in like Photokit Sharpener.

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/re...harpener.shtml



And when you need real detail the world of astronomy has lent a helping hand to general photography.

One program that I have used the trial version of that really does seem to be very impressive uses the Richardson-Lucy, Van Cittert or maximum entropy image restoration algorithms. These methods are extremely effective, but demand massive processing power. (Note first you use the best up-rezzing method you can - then you enhance the image.)

http://www.clarkvision.com/imagedeta...-restoration1/

And the program he was using for the test

http://www.mlunsold.com/

Have a look at some of the samples on the website, they are truly amazing. Now be aware that it can take several hours to process a single picture, but depending on the volumes you have to enlarge this may not be an issue, also with the new multi-core machines you can have one running and still have a machine that you can do your email on. You could off-line it to a cheapish dedicated PC or just run the enlargement overnight. That gives you 7 ultra-high resolution images a week. Will you need more? A catalogue of 365 images capable of very large prints in a year.

And of course AFTER all of that is said, it is also true that you can apply every one of those software techniques to the image from a 5D too, so the initial boost in resolution gives an advantage that is maintained through the whole image enhancement process.

That help? No I'm not surprised. :lol: I am in a similar dilemma, should I upgrade to the 5D or not. Bah.




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Old Sep 30, 2006, 10:33 AM   #7
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peripatetic,

For you I'd say go for it if Canon doesn't release anything to replce the 5D by February. Iwas quite "broke" after buying the 5D, especially since I decided to keep my 20D as a backup. I find myself using the 5D most of the time, even when I'm shooting telephoto. I ended up trading my Canon 75 - 300 IS and getting the Sigma 100 - 300 F4 and a 1.4 multiplier just so that I coulduse the 5D and get similar magification as when using the 20D at 300mm.If you shoot landscapes you find that your old 28 mm lens work like wide angles again. You can also get20mm or 24mm primes for a decent price. However if you shoot telephoto, there a definite difference in effective zoom.
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Old Oct 1, 2006, 10:33 AM   #8
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Yeah, I'm pretty set on the 5D. My photography fund is building up so that I shouldn't be too broke afterwards. See how's that for discipline.

I'll be getting it with the 24-105 kit.

And then if I can get a decent price for my 20D + 17-85 I'll sell that to clear off anything I might have on the credit card. Otherwise I will probably just keep it as a backup camera or loan/give it to a family member.

My Sigma 12-24 and Canon 70-300 DO will just transfer, and I'm actually looking forward to seeing them on the 5D.

My primes I'll keep, although I think I'll trade in my 50mm f1.8 for either a 50mm f1.4 immediately or perhaps hang on to it and save up for the new 50mm L.

After that it will be one of the new A3 semi-pro printers, HP and Canon are finally beginning to compete with Epson, so that's quite exciting and should be good for the price too.

I may decide to hang on till February though, hoping for a 5D replacement (not with more Mp) but I quite like the idea of anti-dust feature and Digic III, but honestly for my photography I really can't see any significant flaws in the 5D at the moment.

If I don't like the replacement then I will hopefully be able to pick up a discounted 5D.


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