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Old Oct 11, 2006, 2:07 AM   #1
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Need help!
Is my sensor dirty? How to really clean it up? What tools to use?
I've checked the lens, they're squeaky clean, filter's clean too!
The mirror is dirty though, but that shouldn't affect the photos, right?
Forgot, it's an Eos350D/Digital Rebel XT
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Old Oct 11, 2006, 12:07 PM   #2
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the spots in the last picture looks like dust ..

take a blue sky at f22 or fully closed. Check if u still have dust.

few things that can help u are

1) A rocket blowe. Simple to use. Gets rid of the dust temporarily. The dust may come back even if ur noit changing lens

2) go to www.copperhillimages.comtheere they have explained the complete process of cleaning a sensor using copper hill method. I am using this method. With Care this method can yeild a great result. Again, u need to take a little care when employing this method.

3) Take it to a shop and they can clean it for 30-50 dollors.

Vj
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Old Oct 11, 2006, 12:59 PM   #3
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I've had my 20D for a little over a year and my digital rebel for over two years. The only thing I've ever used to clean my sensors is a rocket blower. I was at an air show 2 weeks ago and took 200 pictures most of which were aimed at a clear blue sky. I use the blower before I left and there is not a dust speck to be found. I was actually supprised because I changed lenses several times that day and it was pretty windy. But I'm careful when I change my lenses, and change them pretty fast also. I use my blower about 2 or 3 times a month or right before a major shoot, and my sensor stays very clean. I test it by taking a picture of a piece of white foam board with a wide angle lens stopped down to f11. Dump the picture into photoshop and hit auto levels. Believe me if you have any dust on your sensor it will show up.
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Old Oct 11, 2006, 2:36 PM   #4
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unless the pictures appear to have dust at lower f numbers and if ur not closing down the lens often to f9-f22 one can live with the dust

only when u need those close down shots at high fnumber u will end up in trouble to see those nasty spots spoiling ur image..there are lot of ways to clean them though

i do it in aperture and get a decent result.

Vj
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Old Oct 12, 2006, 1:13 AM   #5
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thanks for the quick replies. I used the bulb blower, but it was ineffective. The I stepped up to a ball pump, it was somewhat cleaner but there are still specks of dust.
Used a microfibre cloth next to wipe it up. Better but the corners are still dusty.
Guess I need to get somesort of a cleaning solution from the camera shops, or to get them to do it for me.

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Old Oct 12, 2006, 4:01 PM   #6
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I use sensor wipes and eclipse cleaning fluid. The process is simple first use the blower brush with the mirror down with camera body facing down. Make sure a newly charged battery is in and use the blower brush again with the shutter open in cleaning mode. Put a couple of drops of cleaning fluid on the sensor wipe and use gentle firm pressure on the filter covering the sensor the plastic handle of the wiper should bend slightly. Starting from one side of the sensor filter wipe in one unbroken movement, turn the wipe over and swab the other way. If their is really obstinate muck repeat the process. I clean the sensor filter on my D200 and D70 about every three months, after sending the D70 body to Nikon for cleaning where it was returned just as dirty as it was sent the dust bunnies had just been moved around a bit. Everyone will say don't do it but Nikon Japan actually sale cleaning kits to the public. All you need is a fairly steady hand and reasonable care.
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Old Oct 12, 2006, 5:47 PM   #7
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try these guys... http://www.micro-tools.com/store/home.aspx

i use their Eclipse cleaning fluid and SensorSwabs, works quite well. i've never had much luck with blowers.
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Old Oct 19, 2006, 2:59 PM   #8
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Visited this site http://www.cleaningdigitalcameras.com went to Target bought the right size small spatula, next over to Mike's Camera here in Denver purchased the pec pads and eclipse alcohol, breathed deep three times followed the instructions and had excellent results. The hardest part was getting past the fear of harming my 30D.

Good Luck

David W
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Old Oct 19, 2006, 5:10 PM   #9
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I had a few problems with dust on the sensor of a used 350d that I purchased recently. Tried a blower and that got rid of most but there were a couple stubborn specks that just wouldn't budge... went into camera store here that deals with trade (rather than the usual consumer retail stores) wanting to buy swabs to use with IPA (isopropyl alcohol) but they advised me to try a "SpeckGrabber" tool instead. I was a little sceptical at first but purchased one anyway and I must say that I was thoroughly impressed.
It is a little plastic tube with a 'sticky' rubber tip on it. All you have to do (after cleaning the tip of the tool with an alcohol wipe) is lightly touch the edge of the tip onto any speck of dust and the speck sticks to the tool, then just clean the tip of the tool off with an alcohol wipe again. Although the tip is 'sticky' it doesn't leave any sticky residue etc, it's 'stickiness' is due to properties of the rubber.
Only problem with this tool is that ideally you need to be able to see the specks on the sensor (a good magnifying glass or jewelers loup helps here, as does as nice bright light). I still had a few very small specks that I couldn't actually see and, being the obsessive perfectionist that I am, I wanted to get rid of. I knew roughly where they were, from looking at a photo of the sky, so just used the flat end of the tip to lightly dab a few times in that spot and it succeeded in getting rid of almost all of them.
I will probably still get some swabs one day for occasional (maybe once or twice a year) thorough clean but for general cleaning I highly reccomend the SpeckGrabber (and a good strong blower (rocket/grenade/etc)). It is small, lightweight, reusable, easy to use etc and if you're travelling then there isn't the hassle of carrying flammable liquid.

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