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Old Dec 18, 2006, 11:59 AM   #1
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On a normal, "over the shoulder" sunlite picture , does the 30D have to have any +EV added in order to get a properly exposed photo? I am not asking about scenes that have to adjusted for,just a normal "sunny 16" type of picture. Or maybe,with the camera set on Auto,does the camera produce a correct exposure ? Any exposure issues with this camera at all? Thanks
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Old Dec 18, 2006, 2:11 PM   #2
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While I can't speak for each and every 30D produced, mine came out of the box with correct, accurate, printable exposure with the standard "behind the photographer" (or over the shoulder as you refer to) sunlighting. It is correct in most situations, too.

Auto does just fine in general situations.

And, since I choose to spot meter more often than not in Program mode, all my exposures are generally accurate with no added EV ... with special exceptions, of course. Personally, I find it a very accurate camera in normal conditions.

Hope this helps answer your questions
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Old Dec 18, 2006, 3:59 PM   #3
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I've been using Canon's matrix metering for so long I just instinctively know when it's going to under or overexpose a scene. It doesn't often need adjustment though.

It's very easy to dial in exposure compensation on the 20D/30D, just turn the thumb wheel with the shutter half depressed. The EC is shown in the viewfinder as you adjust it.

You can of course bracket too if you want to.
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Old Dec 20, 2006, 9:35 PM   #4
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hgernhardtjr wrote:
Quote:
While I can't speak for each and every 30D produced, mine came out of the box with correct, accurate, printable exposure with the standard "behind the photographer" (or over the shoulder as you refer to) sunlighting. It is correct in most situations, too.

So it is possible to get good pictures out of the box with the 30D? I ask because on another topic somehwere here a few days ago someone complained about not getting good pictures and another poster said Canon 30Ds aren't as sharp out of the box as some other manufacturers.
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Old Dec 20, 2006, 10:39 PM   #5
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Andrew,
The question was about exposure, not about sharpness.

Sharpness is completely unrelated. It more has to do with how steady you (or your tripod) are (so there is no motion blur), how good the lens is (lower quality lenses are not sharp, among other problems), if you used enough shutter speed to stop subject motion, and the sharpness setting in the camera (if you're shooting in RAW.)

The sharpness being lower than you might expect is not an artifact of Canon... all DSLRs do it (as far as I know.) I don't know which thread you read, so I don't know if you understand the generally accepted reasons.

They are basically that:
- Adding sharpness is fairly easy, removing it is difficult.
- Some pictures want sharpness, others don't. Most models don't want every pore of their skin showing, but a nature photographer wants the detail in the fur or feathers to pop out at you.
- And don't forget that you can increase in-camera sharpening if you want. It's just a setting, like it is on point and shoot cameras.

Eric
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Old Dec 21, 2006, 4:45 PM   #6
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Thank youfor the correctionEric S. I see I did confuse the two.

And thank you for the related information.
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Old Mar 17, 2007, 5:22 AM   #7
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Quote:
Sharpness is completely unrelated. It more has to do with how steady you (or your tripod) are (so there is no motion blur), how good the lens is (lower quality lenses are not sharp, among other problems), if you used enough shutter speed to stop subject motion, and the sharpness setting in the camera (if you're shooting in RAW.)
I believe you mean, if you are NOT shooting in RAW?


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