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Old Dec 22, 2006, 12:15 PM   #1
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I mostly use spot metering on my 30D and center focus in aperture mode. In shooting landscapes or groups, would I change the metering and also the center focus point? Thanks, donna
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Old Dec 22, 2006, 1:08 PM   #2
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Well the Centre-AF issue crops up from time to time.

This article makes it clear under which conditions it can be a bad idea.

http://visual-vacations.com/Photogra...pose_sucks.htm

As for metering I suggest you pick one metering mode and stick to it. I use the matrix mode, and have been using it so long I pretty much know how it's going to expose a scene. So I can dial in exposure compensation where necessary. The advantage of this is that I don't generally have to use the exposure lock button. The matrix metering does the job for me.

If you are accomplished at juding your metering from the spot metering mode then, all things being equal, you will probably be more accurate in your exposure. But using exposure lock is a little more complicated.
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Old Dec 22, 2006, 1:23 PM   #3
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The article on center focusing was a real eye opener! I pretty much always use center focus and recompose the shot...explains a lot of fuzzy pics and especially since I get my aperture wide open a lot...donna
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Old Dec 22, 2006, 1:24 PM   #4
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The article on center focusing was a real eye opener! I pretty much always use center focus and recompose the shot...explains a lot of fuzzy pics and especially since I get my aperture wide open a lot... But do I understand it correctly to say if I center focus and don't recompose I wll be in focus. donna
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Old Dec 22, 2006, 3:39 PM   #5
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Every metering mode gets it wrong at some time. You need to learn this and know how to correct for it. so I agree with the previous post that you should stick with one and learn how to use it.

Here is an example. If you spot meter on a person with a white shirt, it will try to turn that shirt 18% grey and it will set the exposure wrong. You'll have to use exposure compensation to correct.

If you were photographing a strongly backlit subject in a green shirt (which is close to 18% grey) then it would get it right, where other metering modes would get it wrong.

I use ceter weight average & the center AF point. I rarely recompose, although if Canon every comes out with a 1DMkIIN replacement with eye focus that actually worked well, I'd buy it in a heartbeat. My subjects are rarely around long enough to make recomposing possible. And when I can recompose, I try to make sure to stop down a bit.

Eric
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Old Dec 22, 2006, 3:48 PM   #6
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Thanks Eric. I just bought a field guide to the 30D and hopefully I will get some time after Christmas to really get into it. I have gotten into the habit of taking my camera along with me most of the time...so I can practice what I am trying to learn.

And a Merry Christmas to those on the Canon Forum. Donna
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Old Dec 22, 2006, 10:04 PM   #7
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Hi Donna,

Let me be the voice of dissent. If you were a basic amateur learning the ins/outs of digital photography, the advice on sticking with one meter mode might be valid. However, I have briefly viewed your images and you have obvious ability. To limit yourself to one metering mode is like limiting yourself to one shooting mode (Av, Tv, manual, etc). The various modes are there for a reason - they each work best in given/known situations. If you just read a little and understand the differences in the modes, you'll quickly know which will produce the overall best exposure for your intended image. Sure, if you shoot RAW you can correct a lot in post. But why? It's always best to start with the best info and make it better - or not even have to. Counting on post processing to correct metering mistakes is taking a chance that isn't always necessary or beneficial. Eric's examples are technically correct, but they are also examples of why you should learn the modes and not "stick with one", which really doesn't solve any of the issues he addresses.

I'm a firm believer in - if you bought a camera with good capabilities, then learn to use them. Only people with money to burn buy stuff just bcz they can afford it. Taking the approach that "sticking with one meter mode" is best, even in the short term, is...well, short-sighted IMO. You have some good work. There are only 3 modes to learn, and it isn't hard. Always try to learn more, not find a crutch to shorten the learning path. Your images will only improve. And they are good to begin with. Happy shooting and, learning. Both are fun and rewarding. (P.S. By the way, I'm from Maryland too, so my opinon counts slightly more!:lol: )

Ray
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Old Dec 22, 2006, 10:26 PM   #8
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Thanks Ray for the advice and comments. I guess you know Maryland has lots of photo opportunities...Assateague wildlife refuge being one of my favorites. But I hear what you are saying and I bought this camera because it was capable of taking some great images, and was feature rich, so I WILL learn to use it! donna
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Old Dec 23, 2006, 9:49 AM   #9
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D.Ann wrote:
Quote:
The article on center focusing was a real eye opener! I pretty much always use center focus and recompose the shot...explains a lot of fuzzy pics and especially since I get my aperture wide open a lot...donna
Well I guess I fall into that catagory too Donna. I had never thought of this. Thanks Peripatetic! I still have much to learn about my 30D also:idea:
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Old Dec 23, 2006, 4:08 PM   #10
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Well, let's not get too carried away.

Much of the time centre-recompose is fine. The crucial point is that it's a bad idea where you have very narrow DOF. That means usually a wide aperture and an object that is close to you.

If you are shooting with a smaller aperture and the subject is not too close you usually have enough DOF so that it may not be a real problem.

And as Ray is from Maryland too, I shall have to bow to his wisdom. :blah: By all means learn to use all the metering modes on your camera. :-)

If you become accomplished at using the spot mode however I can't see how it could ever fail you. I guess my point really was that if you do become expert at judging how a particular mode will meter a scene then it's really not necessary to master the other modes.

I very rarely have to adjust my shots by more than half a stop in the RAW conversion. And of course you know about why you should be exposing for the highlights, like you do with positive film.

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...se-right.shtml
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