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Old Jan 23, 2007, 11:01 AM   #1
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I want to achieve the best quality from my Canon Rebel XTi, I don't care investing time for pre and post proccesing, And I want your advice of which parameters to adjust my camera for optimal quality.
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Old Jan 23, 2007, 10:07 PM   #2
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The way to get the best result out of your camera it to shoot in RAW using the Adobe RGB color space.

There are places where sRGB is close to as large as Adobe RGB, but in other ways Adobe RGB is much larger.

Of course, if you're using Photoshop you could just have it converted into the Lab color space, which is even larger.

But do realise that if you're not using sRGB and you plan to post to the web then you'll have to convert the image to sRGB before saving it to JPG or you'll loose contrast.

Eric
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Old Jan 23, 2007, 11:24 PM   #3
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It doesn't matter which RGB you use, the $500,000 Fuji Frontier lab will print your pics beautifully.
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Old Jan 23, 2007, 11:53 PM   #4
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The Fuji Frontier & Noritsu are minilabs, expensive yes, but designed for high volume output to please the general photo printing masses.
They are commonly found in places like Walmart and CostCo.
They do make for very good automated results, their native resolution is 240-250dpi and colorspace is sRgb, they will convert to this if your image files are different.

If you have really good large files (like form a Phase One or Imacon-Hasselblad back, 64bit - 39 megapixels) hunt down a prolab that has Durst Lambda, or Cymbolic Sciences LightJet large format printers. Native resolution runs between 200-400ppi(apparent resolution of 4000dpi) and they still print with the 36bit RGB colorspace.
http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...6.16&lc=en


For the "best" parameters follow what EricS already suggested, RAW AdobeRgb gets the most out of your camera it is capable of.
Even though current printers may not make use of all the information, the future comes fast.
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Old Jan 24, 2007, 12:11 AM   #5
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Time has changed.

CA is home of immigrants from third world countries, some came here with huge cash. Inthe center of wedding services, those Fuji Frontier at walmart wallgreen are nothing, they equipped their lab with top of the line Frontier model. A photographer shoots the wedding, send the disk back to his home country for a group of Photoshop experts back there to fix up the pictures, their job is just photoshop nothing else, they are paid lower than a technician here in the US, after the package is done, it is send back to the photographer here FEDEX.

Some clients prefer instant pictures for the attenting guess, photographers just call them, the lab will open late to pick up the cards, or any format jpeg, raw...include medium format, print the pictures and deliver back to the reception party,all are done in 1hrbythe time the couple is cutting the cake, it's a way to say thank you for coming instead of sending a thank you note thru the mail.

You can shoot any format in CA, these kind of lab will take care the rest, wedding quality pictures with a midnight express speed 5f/sec.



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Old Jan 24, 2007, 9:20 AM   #6
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So I can send the photos to the lab as Adobe RGB format as JPG and It will be ok ?
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Old Jan 24, 2007, 9:47 AM   #7
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When you go to the lab, establish a good friendship with the owner, chit chat with him, little by little he recognizes you as a serious photographer, as a friend, he'll work on your pictures on a personal basis, my lab owner even lets me sit behind the machine with him so I can see my pics on the monitor, we discuss how big I can enlarge my good shot.
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Old Jan 24, 2007, 11:02 AM   #8
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Ok, it does sound like you really mean sending the images to a lab. I did not get this from reading your posts.

If you want to send it to a lab and get the best results, you really need to do a few things:
- find an ICC profile for their printer. This will let you soft-proof the results of their printer on your computer. http://www.drycreekphoto.com/ has lots of profiles for walmart and costco printser... although looking at your "location" this won't help you much.
- Like coldshot said, make friends with someone who runs the printer. When they understand your needs, you'll get better results. Then you can get them to turn off all the automatic processing which will help the average photographer but can mess up the more non-traditional photos taken by a more advanced photographer.

You really need to know if the place keeps the equipment up. If its a real photo lab, then they will (its their job) but if its not... if its just a store with a printer then you could be in trouble (or in luck! Cause it will be cheaper.) You need to make sure that they will produce *consistent* results all the time. Using the same papers and inks, and keeping the printer in good working order. Just because they use "matte" or "glossy" paper doesn't mean its the same brand each time. And if they change brands the editing you'll have done could produce a different looking print the next time.


This is the benefit of going to a photo lab. But you pay more for that difference.

Eric
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Old Jan 24, 2007, 8:09 PM   #9
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Pick a busy lab, it tells you that the customers are happy to come back, callfirst for info, what format they can do, at the same time notice the lab technician how he handles the call, polite, rude...then go from there.

Here is the hard part, no matter how good the lab is they don't know your preference until you know the operator who processes your pictures. Most operators are part time college students some have very good skill to manage that sofisticated printer than supermaket operators.

There are two part time guys in my local lab, each prints my pictures differently, the one who has some background in art does a better job than the other, so one good lab doesn't mean you get good pictures, depend on who you know, same as going for a haircut, same salon but you get different haircut with different person.

Socialize with the operator, as soon as you have a friend in the lab the opportunity to make money is endless with your camera. He's the one who sees a lot of mistakes from pros on their pictures, he can point out those to you so you can avoid making those same mistakes, mostly pressure out there on the field, some lab techinciansare photographers themselves, you'll learn alot from them face to face.
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