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Old Jul 7, 2003, 6:53 AM   #1
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Default Questions about the 10D

I just ordered my 10D from B & H I have been reading posts on this forum for a while. Please forgive me if these questions have been dealt with before.
1) I take a lot of sunset pictures. Is the CMOS of the 10D any more suseptable to damage from the sun than CCD chips? I have never had any problems with my Sony Mavica FD 97.
2) I am an amatuer astronomer. I am very excited about being able to use this camera as an alternative to CCD's which are sold only for astrophotography. I saw a picture of the Andromeda Galaxy as a POTD at this site last fall which was wonderful! The question here is - does Canon or any other aftermarket producer offer an old fashioned T-Mount which would allow insertion into a 1.25 inch eyepiece focuser for this camera? I'm assuming the camera will function on manual and the "bulb" function will be available.

I 'll have more questions later. I'm excited to get the camera. I'm having to buy my system in stages. For now I bought the camera with the "standard" f1.8 II 50mm lens, a 550 EX Speedlite, a Hakuba Aluminum case, a Delkin 1Gb CF card, and a DaProtector LCD protector. I plan on selling my darkroom equipment and Olympus OM-4 system to buy a 100-400mm f4.5-5.6L IS USM lens this fall. I'll get the Canon 1.4x TC II as well. (I take a lot of wildlife photos.) My next project will be to earn enough for a 16-35 f2.8L USM probably in the spring.
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Old Jul 7, 2003, 8:13 AM   #2
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1)
I believe you will be fine, but I don't actually *know*. I've taken pictures of sunsets with the camera and I haven't had a problem. But I am certainly no athority on this, so don't quote me and done come after me if something goes wrong (ok, I'm done covering my legal butt.) Here is a link to one of my pictures:
http://www.stevesforums.com/phpBB2/v...ic.php?t=11464

2) Yes, they certainly do. You'll have a fixed aperture, and you'll loose AF, but it should work. I asked about this for using the camera with digiscoping and was told it existed by someone I trust. If you call B&H, I'm sure they would know about such a device.

One of the remote shutter releases that canon makes has a timer on it. It is amazingly flexable. You should consider this when doing astrophotography. I think I know where there is a review of it....

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/tc-80n3.shtml

I have the 100-400L. BUy it from a place you know you can return it. Some are very good, others are junk. So be ready to return a copy or two before you are happy with it. But when you get a good one... wow! Just amazing. And it takes a 1.4x TC very well.

If you won't want to spend that much money on the wide angle lens, look for the thread here about the 19-?? lenses. There are some good ones (but not at f2.8) which are much cheaper.

Next on my list is a good tripod & ball head and the 550ex speedlight.

Eric
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Old Jul 7, 2003, 5:17 PM   #3
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Eric,

Thanks for the quick reply. I checked out the remote timer. It looks like I will get one of those for my astrophotography. Thanks!

I will check with B & H to find a T-mount adapter.

Do have recommendations as to how I would best test the resolution of my future 100-400mm f4.5-5.6 L lens? What criteria should I look for to tell what is acceptable or not? I believe I read in one of your earlier posts or a response to one of mine that you are picky about quality of your photos and your equipment - so am I. However, if possible, I would like some type of quantitiative criteria to look for rather than qualitative/subjective items. Having never owned one before, I need an idea of what justifies an exchange. Is B & H good about exchanges or would you recommend some place else?
I own a Swarovski 80mm HD spotting scope and a pair of 10 x 42 Nikon Superior E binoculars for birding. They are tack sharp and almost completely free of chromatic aberration. I'm pretty hard to please.

I noticed you have the 50 mm f1.8 II lens. The $69 price tag scares me some. I have read it has a plastic housing, but most seem to think the optical quality is not too bad. I'm not going to expect miracles for that price, but I hope I am not degrading the camera too much by using it temperarily.
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Old Jul 7, 2003, 6:02 PM   #4
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Default digital astro website

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/digita...guid=115787246

The above site is a good forum with lots of discussion about using various camera and telescope combinations. good plac e to get answers to your astro-digital questions.
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Old Jul 7, 2003, 11:01 PM   #5
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Yes, I am very picky about both sharpness and composition. Probably too picky for my skill.
I've used a Swarovski 80mm myself. Very nice. I've seriously considered getting one and a CP 4500 for digiscoping. Much cheaper (and longer range) than a 500mm Canon lens. But then again, what isn't? (Except the 600mm!) I'll be taking a trip to Maine next month, so the moment of truth will be coming soon.

To test the 100-400, you need to be *very* careful. I would get a lens chart and take pictures of it in proper lighting with all the proper steps taken to remove camera shake. Some (but not all) are using the remote shutter release, mirror lock up, a top quality tripod and head, do it in the basement where you are not on a bouncy floor, but a good solid structure. Many say manual forcus. Personally, I'm not sure I'm good enough at it to trust myself. You might even consider unplugging the refridge while you do it. Then take some pictures at different apertures of the test chart, and at different zooms.

Then you have two ways to evaluate the results.

1) Compare the results to what others say it should do, including Canon's posted results (althought I wouldn't be surprised if they lie.. ah, are incorrect. They are known to be wrong for other lenses, so this would be nothing new.) I've heard, for example, that the sharpness of the lens really drops off between 380 (or so) and 400mm. So test for that. You (probably) can't do as good a job testing as a professional, so don't expect something that good. But go for something "close enough."

2) Look at it and see if you think it's good enough. Because in the end, no matter how many test charts you take, what really matters is how well it performs in the field. If it is good enough on the test chart, then its good enough and be happy. Don't discount the subject evaluation.

I haven't used the 50mm f1.8 that much. I got it for when I get extention tubes for macro work (and as a portrate lens.) I do a lot of hiking under trees and this lens will give me a lot of aperture to play with in the dark. It has been sharp enough for me, and it's dirt cheap compared to the 50mm f1.4. It does have a really cheap focusing ring... really cheap.

Eric
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