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Old Jul 16, 2003, 12:01 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by etee
Quote:
Originally Posted by barthold
Barthold
No, you're not that far off. I used to use the shutter speed >= focal length measurement, myself. I have discovered (thanks to a correspondence course I am taking) that it is even better if you can set the shutter speed to at least 2x the focal length - meaning that you are looking at around 1/1000". I have started applying this, and my handheld shots are even sharper than they were.
The idea of using shutter speed at least equal or larger than the selected focal length of the lens is to minimize and reduce the risk of vibration or movement when taking picture, so you don't get the blur image, but never free you from those risks. Of course you can increase the shutter speed to double of triple that value, but depend on the lighting condition and the end result that you expect from your photograph (type of picture you're taking), how do you want your DOF looks like in your final photogragh?. Remember when you set your shutter speed on higher value, you have to compensate for your exposure by open your lens to allow for proper exposure (if you use shutter priority mode, the camera will do this automatically). At larger openning of the lens, your DOF will be very limited. It may work very well with single subject in action photgraphy, but it may not work with multi-subjects, and ofcourse it may not suitable for landscape photography or group portrait phtography. Understanding the basic exposure in photography will help you take better photograph.
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Old Jul 20, 2003, 10:05 AM   #12
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I fought with this problem when I first got my 10D. I shoot near sunset and in shade often and it was just too dark to get the shutter speeds I need to get a sharp picture.

my solution was two fold:

1) Shoot in Av and just make sure you get the shutter speed you need. If not go to step two.

2) Up the ISO or the exposure compensation to get an acceptable shutter speed. ISO will produce noise that can be removed with neat image. It does a great job of reducing noise, but you still lost detail in the picture... so you'll probably have to have to reduce it to get something decent (and sharpen it a lot.)

But the real savior to me was exposure compensation. I bump ISO to 200 or 400 and use exposure comp instead of going to ISO 800. The noise level at ISO800 is much higher than at 400. Using Exposure Comp to up the shutter speed in Av will darken the image. But you can usually brighten the picture using levels in PS. It is definitely better to get it right in the camera (playing with levels isn't cost free), but if it allows you to get a picture which would otherwise be blurry then use it!

Eric
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Old Jul 20, 2003, 6:37 PM   #13
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Eric good suggestion I will try that.
But why not shoot in raw you can compensate ALOT more than.

Greetings,
Frank
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Old Jul 20, 2003, 11:07 PM   #14
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Are you suggesting that I can use exposure compensation when converting a RAW to a TIFF? It was my believe (someone please correct me!) that this setting was actually adjusting the aperture. Since that is a physical attribute of the camera, you can't do it on a RAW.

I have only 1 512MB flash card. I can fill that in about 2 hours of shooting nature stuff with the largest JPG. I would have to buy more flash (or a portable hard disk) if I switched to RAW. There are so many other ways I can improve my photography (technique) that I'm not worrying about RAW and what it would get me just yet.

Eric
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Old Jul 21, 2003, 3:54 AM   #15
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I don't know if it's the same as exposure compensation on the camera but I do know that underexpossed images which needed ALOT of curves and levels are much better when processed in raw.

One tip (from a fellow sick person, I also shoot arround 400 images on a day off in the zoo) buy a XsDrive with a 30GB harddrive, the retail over here for arround $ 285,00 and use an extra 128MB CF card for the shooting while downloading to the drive .

Greetings,
Frank
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Old Jul 21, 2003, 9:02 AM   #16
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I use a SanDiskUltra 512mb and Kingston 256mb CF and a 256 mb xD with my Canon 10D.

For longer foto sessions I have my XdriveII/40gb, also using with MMC/SD/SMC and xD (with CF-adapter). It's fine, quick and simple.

It's my companion during holidays, price in Europe Euro 249.-

No error, using it since some month.
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Old Jul 22, 2003, 9:43 AM   #17
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If you shoot in RAW, it will allow you great flexiblity to edit your picture in post processing, better than when you save your file in JPEG, but everything has its limitation, you can only correct the photograph to a certain degree and you can't just go beyond that. Exposure compensation is a great feature, either you use that or changing the ISO, it works the same but it will be a trade off any time you do so if you decide to accept the compromise ( over exposure the background, loosing detail, introduce noise). For the sunset type pf picture, to record those golden moment and the beautiful ambient light, you need to use the tripod, shoot as aperture priority if you prefer, set your aperture to achieve your desired DOF, let the camera set the shutter speed( be-careful of what you metering at), and since the camera is on the tripod, you can assure that you don't have a blurry picture, if possible, use the timer function or reomte control to shoot. The same apply to existing light phtography when you want to shoot big city night.
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Old Jul 22, 2003, 10:14 AM   #18
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I've been shooting in RAW now and the quality is indeed better, now I need a bigger Harddrive in my PC within 6 months .

Greetings,
Frank
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Old Jul 24, 2003, 10:06 AM   #19
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I shoot in RAW only and have been absolutely amazed at how much you can recover out of an otherwise completely unusable picture. It's really the only way to go. Memory is cheap, a new 120 Gig Hard drive is just over 100$.
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Old Jul 24, 2003, 10:56 AM   #20
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I know we own a PC shop , so I buy from my own stock.

Greetings,
Frank
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