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Old Jul 14, 2003, 4:00 PM   #1
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Default Help me ????

As you might know I have switched from my HP-850 to the 10D.

Although I'm VERY VERY pleased with the camera I have some questions.

I was out today with the 10D and a EF 75-300, 4-5.6 III lens, and almost all pictures are very bad (moved).

I aimed for the P setting and a ISO of 100.

When I want to shoot at 300MM I would however rather have to choose AV with an aperture of arround 4-6 and ISO400 to get solid shots with good focus without a tripod.

Is this correct ?

With the HP 850 I used a Raynox 1.54x convertor giving me the same zoom as the 300 on the canon and I could shoot at ISO 100-200 without having focus problems (aperture at 3-6).

The HP850 lens however was a 2.8.

Could someone point me in the right direction ?

My opinion is (at the moment).
That when shooting without tripod on 300mm I have to choose AV option with anything under 7 and ISO400.

Greetings,
Frank

Example made this afternoon.

Some curves were used to get the detail out of the bird, this is the exiff data.

Exposure time 1/750s
F number : 9.5
ISO 400
Shutter speed 0.001333s
Aperture value 6,49585
Max aperture value 4.97086
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Old Jul 14, 2003, 11:38 PM   #2
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Hi Frank,

Don't forget the 1.6x multiplication factor! At 300 mm you have a 480mm lens, effectively. To get sharp pictures while holding the camera in your hand, a shutterspeed of 1/500 would be nice. I have the same 75-300 lens, and was browsing some pictures. Indeed the ones with the shutter speed around the focal length were the nice sharp ones.

Cranking up the ISO setting will get you the higher shutter speed. Given enough light (and aperture) you should be able to get nice pictures at ISO 100.

Maybe I'm totally off, but who knows

Barthold
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Old Jul 15, 2003, 11:05 AM   #3
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When using the long telephoto or long telephoto zoom lens, it it recommended that you use a tripod or at least the monopod to minimize the risk of camera shake. The bird picture lacks a little of sharpness, probably due the the handshake. The overall exposure looks fine, we can see some detail in the shadow areas. Howver this picture has a lot of noises, you can use photoshop to reduce the noise, next time try to set the camera a lower ISO such as ISO 100 and shoot with a monopod (easier to pan the camera with the monopod than the tripod), select the exposure with the shutter speed higher than the selected focal length of the lens and don't forget to use the tracking focus mode of the camera to ensure sharpness. On the composition side, if this is the original frame, you need to allow just a little more space on front of the bird.

Cheers
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Old Jul 15, 2003, 11:17 AM   #4
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Hi,

Thanks for the comments, I think I got it now.
Will post some shots this afternoon in the other photos section.

Greetings,
Frank
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Old Jul 15, 2003, 1:45 PM   #5
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It all worked out fine with the ISO settings and Shutterspeeds, thanks alot.

But why do the pictures on the LCD look very very bright while on the PC they are very dark and muddy.

It can all be fixed with a little curves in ps7.0 but it puzzles me.

a few shots with the new settings, shot on 800ISO 1/4000 sec and ISO800 1/2000sec.









I'm beginning to REALLY love the 10D, it's so fast and easy to handle.
Thanks again.

Greetings,
Frank
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Old Jul 15, 2003, 2:33 PM   #6
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Quote:
But why do the pictures on the LCD look very very bright while on the PC they are very dark and muddy.

It can all be fixed with a little curves in ps7.0 but it puzzles me.
Hi Frank,

I'm not sure why Canon chose to boost the brightness so much on the LCD; perhaps so it could be seen easier in bright sunlight - but unlike a conventional digicam, the appearance on the LCD has nothing in common with the actual exposure.

This is true of every 10D I've seen or used. There is a menu adjustment where you can drop the brightness, but whether or not you want to do this depends on how you use your camera and whether you have an Xtend-a-View (recommended) for viewing the LCD in bright sunlight. The Xtend-a-View is a simple 2x loupe/sunshade which you can put around your neck on a lanyard cord (I use them with all my cameras). So you can adjust the brightness of the LCD way down to somewhat correlate with the image capture itself and use the Xtend-a-View or - and this is ALWAYS the better way to go - use the histogram to quickly check your exposure and correct if necessary. You may need to tinker with the exposure compensation to get it just the way you want, but overall it will be a gigantic step forward as you have undoubtedly already discovered.

Best regards,

Lin
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Old Jul 15, 2003, 3:08 PM   #7
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I will check with the histogram next time, but there is so much to discover, sometimes I loose track and I long back to my HP-850...................... NOT !!! (although it's an amazing camera on it's own).



Greetings,
Frank
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Old Jul 16, 2003, 12:18 AM   #8
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Hi Frank,

Also, make sure your PC monitor is reasonably well calibrated. If it is set too dark you might adjust an image in Photoshop while that is not necessary. The Photoshop Elements version that came with the 10D has a nice little gamma-correction utility. It also has a good layman's explanation about monitor calibration and how to use that gamma utility in the help menu.

Barthold
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Old Jul 16, 2003, 3:17 AM   #9
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Hi,

My monitor is flat at D6500 +/- 25 degrees and is calibrated well, it's my job in normal life .

Greetings,
Frank
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Old Jul 16, 2003, 10:08 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barthold
Hi Frank,

Don't forget the 1.6x multiplication factor! At 300 mm you have a 480mm lens, effectively. To get sharp pictures while holding the camera in your hand, a shutterspeed of 1/500 would be nice. I have the same 75-300 lens, and was browsing some pictures. Indeed the ones with the shutter speed around the focal length were the nice sharp ones.

Cranking up the ISO setting will get you the higher shutter speed. Given enough light (and aperture) you should be able to get nice pictures at ISO 100.

Maybe I'm totally off, but who knows

Barthold
No, you're not that far off. I used to use the shutter speed >= focal length measurement, myself. I have discovered (thanks to a correspondence course I am taking) that it is even better if you can set the shutter speed to at least 2x the focal length - meaning that you are looking at around 1/1000". I have started applying this, and my handheld shots are even sharper than they were.

Another thing I have discovered with my 10D is that the IS (Image Stabilizer) lenses that Canon puts out work extremely well. I have the 75-300 IS USM, and intend to get the 28-135 when I get some more spare change. With the 75-300, I was able to take a handheld shot of a nearly full moon in early morning, and I was able to make out the details of individual craters (I was shooting about 1/90" to 1/125" at 300mm).
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