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Old Jul 22, 2003, 3:58 PM   #1
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I am a novice (and I mean novice) at photography in general. I have a Powershot S400 right now and I took a bunch of photos from my wife's hooding and graduation ceremonies. I, needless to say, was very disappointed as to the # of photes that did not turn out. (either to dark, blurry, etc). Well this was a once in a lifetime event and now I have screwed up on capturing it in a manner that I would have prefered. So needless to say, I am looking at the SLR's now, hoping that a camera of this caliber coupled with a good lense or two can help me take better photos. (I am also going to look into taking a class or two in photography to help me out.) To get to my point, is the 10D the way to go, or am I just going to be disappointed with it as I will not know how to use it? Would I be better off with a 35mm slr until I take some classes? I just hate to throw money into a regular slr when I much prefer digital. For that matter, are there any other SLR's coming out (like a successor to the D100) that I should maybe wait for? I was looking at regular SLR's thinking that if I went that route at least any lenses I aquired would be transferable... but then again.. do I want to spend money on a regular SLR when I could pick up the 10D. I just don't know .. Please any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
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Old Jul 22, 2003, 4:52 PM   #2
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Hi,

Don't be offended by what I'm going to say.
The camera is often not the fault unless it's a real stinker.

Most of the time it's the wrong choice of surroundings that will be the real problem.

Like blurry faces or photo's are often due to a to low shutterspeed, a to low aperture size (a higher number) or just plain a wrong setting.

Did you use a flash and are these shots good ?
Did you use a tripod in less than perfect light conditions.

The 10D is a MARVELOUS machine but in the hands of someone who knows what to do, in the hands of my mother it's worse than the HP812 she uses.

I shot with a HP850 for a while and although it's not the best camera arround the pictures I got were simply amazing, but I really had to think about every scene, the 10D makes this even more complicated, but when you know what the numbers mean you will have an almost unlimited use for the 10D.

Hope this helps a bit, and again I don't mean any harm.

Greetings,
Frank
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Old Jul 22, 2003, 6:22 PM   #3
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Hey I'm the one who said I was a Noob not you! I appreciate the feedback.. and quite frankly what you just stated is kind of what I was thinking about. Now if I am going to be taking a class or two in order to learn a thing or two.. do you think that the 10D is a good choice or would I be better served with a cheaper SLR that I could have the learning curve on?
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Old Jul 22, 2003, 9:58 PM   #4
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I agree with what Frank said. The problem could easily be you (my bad pictures are rarely, if ever, the camera.) We could probably tell you if you posted a link to a picture and the EXIF data that went with it… and even why it didn’t work.

People have learned photography for years by using a film SLR. So I'm not sure your last question is phrased correctly. The 10D is a very nice camera… I’m loving every minute of it. It has a lot of automatic modes along with a complete manual mode. I think the question you should ask is how serious you are about photography and how much money you have to spend. In the short run, a film camera is very cheap. You buy one with an eye towards reusing the lenses and you'll save the difference of $1,000 or more (if you find you don’t enjoy photography and stop using it.). That is a lot of money to save. If you are serious about doing photography and will keep at it (i.e. the extra cost of digital is worth it) then I highly recommend either the 10D or the D100. The only thing you loose (in my opinion) is the wider f-stop sensitivity of certain films…. But only professionals use those films any ways, so I wouldn’t worry about it.

It doesn’t look like you need me to extol the virtues of digital, so I won’t waste your time.

Eric
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Old Jul 23, 2003, 3:20 AM   #5
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Hi,

Lessons can only take you so far, the best way (especially with digital) is shooting untill your card smokes . I started a year ago with NO prior knowledge what so ever and my first shots were real stinkers with alot of faults in lighting, composition etc. etc. only by the comments on forums like this one and www.webphotoforum.com I gradualty improved my shooting and at this time I think I can make some pretty neat shots.

The nice thing about digital is that it won't cost you a penny to shoot 200-300 shots a day just for testing.
But you will have a very quick learning curve, you can see directly what you do and this is a very big plus over film which needs to be developed and most of the time you won't have the correct memory of what you did that day.

Greetings,
Frank
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