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Old Aug 24, 2007, 7:35 AM   #1
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I'm expecting delivery of my Sigma 10-22 HSM EX, for use with the Rebel XTi. I mostly shoot landscapes and rarely shoot indoors and I've always like the look of photos taken with polarizing filters.

It seems there's some disagreement regarding the use of polarizers with wide-angle lesnes, with some saying to exercise caution and others claiming they should never be used.

Wondering what the consensus is around here. Thanks.

dg
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Old Aug 24, 2007, 11:00 AM   #2
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in most cases, the issue is one of vignetting. this becomes an issue because polarizers are thicker, so the front edge of the rim is more likely to interfere. since they vary in this regard, you might want to shop for one with a thinner rim, and also consider using it without a UV filter behind.

When doing outdoor shots, you should also be aware that the darkening effect on a blue sky from the polarizer differs with angle from the sun. So in a wide angle shot, you may find the change in sky density to be distracting. But you may like it.

So, the only real answer is to try the filter out. Look at a full image at the widest angle setting to see if there is any evidence of image cutoff at the corners. You could probably even do this in a store. If there is, you have a problem at that setting. If not...
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Old Aug 25, 2007, 7:25 AM   #3
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Excellent response to which I would like to add is the effect of glare... A superwide is also more susceptiple to this effect than a narrower lens especially when a flat filter is mounted to a front element with high curvature.

-> When possible a rear filter would minimize this issue as the light projections are more perpendicular to the rear elements (especially on an APS-C lens)
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Old Aug 25, 2007, 7:45 AM   #4
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Thanks for your responses, klevin and NHL.

klevin touched on an issue I wasn't even aware of, novice that I am: using more than one filter on a lens. I'll try out the polarizer I have and see how it works.

Regarding the glare, would a petal hood help that? The lens I'm expecting comes with one.

Thanks again.

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Old Aug 25, 2007, 8:34 AM   #5
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Using a petal hood with a circular polarizer is not recommended because you will not be able to rotate the polarizing lens since the hood would be over the top of the filter.
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Old Aug 25, 2007, 9:34 AM   #6
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Jeez--of course--forgive the pre-coffee question...:sad:.--dg
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Old Aug 26, 2007, 12:15 PM   #7
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I have used a polarizer with a petal hood by just rotating the polarizer to the desired effect and then putting the hood on. My hood (Canon lens)mounts on flanges on the barrel of the lens. The threaded part of the front ring accepts the polarizer and the two don't really interfere.I know this varies with the lens. My Canon kit lens rotated the front element during focus. I would have to focus manually,rotate the polarizer and touch up the focus.I didn't usethe hood and the polarizer with that lens. Try it to see if you get any vignetting. Also, definitely spend the extra money to get a thin polarizer.
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Old Aug 27, 2007, 11:10 AM   #8
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Hoods are really only useful to keep stray light, that is light outside the field of view of the lens, from striking the front of the lens. But in such cases, a polarizer may or may not be useful anyway.

For example, if you are shooting facing the sun, you might want to control reflections off water or other reflective surfaces. A polarizer will do wonders here, but a hood would be useless. If you were using a polarizer for sky darkening, the sun angle that makes the polarizer useful is unlikely to also be shining on the lens outside the angle of view.

In fact, I'm hard pressed to imagine when you'd want to use both a polarizer and a lens hood. ADShiller, when do you use both?
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