Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Canon EOS dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Sep 8, 2007, 12:21 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
dr_spock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 879
Default

You could also try the Canon Digital Learning Center for more info and tutorials:

http://www.usa.canon.com/dlc/controller?act=HomePageAct



Here is a place to print out a paper lens hood when in a bind...

http://www.lenshoods.co.uk/hoods/Can...5.6-IS-USM.php



Happy shooting and experimenting.
dr_spock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 8, 2007, 12:43 AM   #22
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 31
Default

JohnG wrote:
Quote:
nickphoto123 wrote:
Quote:
All those saying only a lens hood is all that is needed, never mention the hundreds of times they had to clean the front of their coated lens and have affected the coating on their lens. They never admit to this.

hate to disagree with you Nick but if you take care of your gear there's no need to clean your lenses hundreds of times. About twice a year is good.
Quote:
Seems you are ignoring my suggestions. That is not a bad move.....
Glad you think you know more than the rest of us. Sorry the OP didn't bow down and take as gospel your advice but decided to think. Perhaps he'll see the light. Keep working at it Nick - someday you'll be as good a photographer as you think you are
Ouch. Seriously, though, not sure what Nick's issue is. I didn't ignore his suggestions. I welcome all suggestions. I like to hear a myriad of responses before I take just one person's opinion.

Anyway, the rule of thirds is actually incredibly important, Nick. I really dislike the stability in my pictures. They don't provoke any kind of response other than, "Err cute dog," or, "Yeah...flowers...cool.... (I guess)." Now that's not to say that centred objects are always a bad thing, of course...

Anyway, I'm going to tinker some more. I think I'll stay with the automatic modes for the time being to get used to what the camera thinks is best, because I went out this evening as the sun was setting, and took about 50 out-of-focus P and Tv-mode photos that really got me a little down.

Thanks again, all.
WilliamG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 8, 2007, 7:15 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
nickphoto123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 1,356
Default

Hi WilliamG

I have no issues. In fact I wrote it is not a bad idea to ignore my suggestions!

How such a statement makes one a 'know it all' as one poster wrote is a mystery.

You should ignore the Rule of Thirds. Learn to use your camera first.

The best way to do so at no expense except your time is to try my above posted suggestions.

Good shooting with your camera.

P.S. To increase your enjoyment of these forums don't let your ego get involved on these posts as other do.

Regards,

Nicholas


nickphoto123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 8, 2007, 8:55 AM   #24
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 8,529
Default

nickphoto123 wrote:
Quote:
Hi WilliamG

I have no issues. In fact I wrote it is not a bad idea to ignore my suggestions!

Nick - you're right. I completely misread. You have my apologies
JohnG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 8, 2007, 10:28 AM   #25
Senior Member
 
nickphoto123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 1,356
Default

No need to JohnG, but I do thank you for your clarification.

Nicholas
nickphoto123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 8, 2007, 11:35 AM   #26
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 31
Default

Well you have my assurance there will be no ego when it comes to photography with me. I'm trying to figure out whether I should just leave everything on "auto" with the camera, or whether I should mess with shutter speeds at the moment. I took some really awful pictures last night, so...

Also, is this 9-point focus thing a bit too much hype? I was trying to take pictures of humming birds last night, and one landed on this bird feeder. The front edge of the bird feeder was closer to me that the actual humming bird, so whenever I was using the AF, it kept insisting on keeping the front of the actual bird feeder in focus, and not the humming bird itself. Is the only way around this to MF? I know with my point-and-shoot everything would have been in focus.
WilliamG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 8, 2007, 11:58 AM   #27
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 8,529
Default

WilliamG wrote:
Quote:
Also, is this 9-point focus thing a bit too much hype? I was trying to take pictures of humming birds last night, and one landed on this bird feeder. The front edge of the bird feeder was closer to me that the actual humming bird, so whenever I was using the AF, it kept insisting on keeping the front of the actual bird feeder in focus, and not the humming bird itself. Is the only way around this to MF? I know with my point-and-shoot everything would have been in focus.
No, it's not hype. But here is one of the tougher aspects of DSLR photography - you have shallower depth-of-field. In the case of focus point selection, the camera unfortunately cannot read your mind. So if 4 different subjects are behind 4 different focus points the camera has to choose one to focus on.

In a situation like this - the way to get the shot is to select only a SINGLE focus point and place that focus point over the humming bird. This way the camera won't mistakenly focus on the feeder instead. On my 20d I used the custom function (forget which one) which allowed me to use the joystick on the back to select focus points. This way it was easy to select either all of them or the one I wanted for the shot (which isn't always the center spot - remember your subject shouldn't always be in the center of the frame).
JohnG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 8, 2007, 3:53 PM   #28
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 99
Default

nickphoto123 wrote:
Quote:
P.S. : Buy a B&W UV filter and put it on your lens. Check B&H and others.

All those saying only a lens hood is all that is needed, never mention the hundreds of times they had to clean the front of their coated lens and have affected the coating on their lens. They never admit to this. An old Polish expression is "Cheap is Expensive".

I'm not going to say that this is a *bad* idea but just be aware that having a UV filter could cause the camera's AF system to have problems. When I first got my 20D I bought UV filters for all my lenses and was having problems with focusing. I stopped using the filters for awhile to see if that would fix the problem and it went away for the most part. Haven't used them for 2 years now.

Don't buy cheap filters, you get what you pay for. Mine weren't cheap but they weren't the best you could get. Do your research.


Proxes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 8, 2007, 9:54 PM   #29
Senior Member
 
nickphoto123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 1,356
Default

Hi Proxes,

That is why I specified B&W UV filters. They are the best IMHO.

I agree with JohnG, use a single focus point. To make things easy use the center point and shoot that way until you get the feel of your camer's response time, etc.

Nicholas

nickphoto123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 8, 2007, 11:43 PM   #30
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 267
Default



First Nick says this to WilliamG:

You have been tossed the Rule of Thirds. IGNORE IT.


How hard is it to learn the rule of thirds Nick? There is no mystery in that.


then...

''My suggestionscause you to foucus on Composition and Light.''


...and suddenly he's required to do the very same thing you told him not to initially?
Andrew Waters is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:31 PM.