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Old Sep 11, 2007, 8:25 AM   #51
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So much information! Thank you very much. So much to learn...
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Old Sep 14, 2007, 10:44 PM   #52
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OK, so I decided to splurge the $15 and buy a UV filter. No comments as yet since I haven't had a chance to use it.

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/olspage....=1155848385752

Is there a point using it indoors?

Also, here's another techy question:

Let's say I'm taking a picture of a lot of people. Is there a way to make them all be in focus like on a point-and-shoot? Right now some people are in focus and others are not...

Thanks all.
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Old Sep 15, 2007, 4:30 AM   #53
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Hi WilliamG,

That's good news.

.....Yes, put your UV it on and keep it on. Once on, your UV filter will protect your lens from many issues.

Indoor use of your camera can be more 'dangerous' than outdoors.

Now you can shoot 'unfettered' without the constant underlying fear of having something damage your lens/coating. $15 is worth the price for such freedom.

-----

......To focus a group of people first try to have each person as equi-distant from your camera as possible and their faces 'parallel' to your camera's sensor plane, meaning hold the camera level horizontally and at 'proper' vertical. If the lighting permits, shoot Aprture priority at f5.6 or f8 (probably the smallest on your point & shoot). Hold your camera steady and shoot.

Hope you find this useful.

Nicholas

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Old Sep 15, 2007, 6:18 AM   #54
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nickphoto123 wrote:
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......To focus a group of people first try to have each person as equi-distant from your camera as possible and their faces 'parallel' to your camera's sensor plane, meaning hold the camera level horizontally and at 'proper' vertical. If the lighting permits, shoot Aprture priority at f5.6 or f8 (probably the smallest on your point & shoot). Hold your camera steady and shoot.
Do you mean a semi-circle (equidistance)?

Most lenses focus along a curvature (i.e. 'spherical aberration') so I agree that it's wiser to close the lens down to the smallest aperture (bigger f-number) as possible to increase the Depht Of Field (DOF) so that everyone is in focus
-> This is the main reason why people using their wide angle have soft edges at close distances for large group standing in a straight line!
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Old Sep 15, 2007, 9:26 AM   #55
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Thank you for the responses. Appreciate them as always. But, what if you have a group of people in a line extending away from you, how do you focus them all at one time? Basically, is there a "full focus" mode a la how a point-and-shoot works?
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Old Sep 15, 2007, 1:06 PM   #56
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WilliamG wrote:
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Thank you for the responses. Appreciate them as always. But, what if you have a group of people in a line extending away from you, how do you focus them all at one time? Basically, is there a "full focus" mode a la how a point-and-shoot works?
Use a wide angle, small aperture (larger f stop number) and don't stand too close to them.

P&S don't have a full focus mode per say, they just have cheap lenses, small sensors and really aren't that much different than a pin hole camera.
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Old Sep 15, 2007, 6:13 PM   #57
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NHL wrote:
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Do you mean a semi-circle (equidistance)?

Not a Semi-Circle, a crescent would be more like it.

My suggestion is not rigid in application, just try to keep your subjects equidistant from the camera.

WilliamG,.......

What you ask is not possible wth a point and shoot, nor usually desirable when photographing people. If you took my s****tion at shooting only at 50mm for a month you would know the answer.

Regards,

Nicholas
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Old Sep 20, 2007, 12:39 PM   #58
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nickphoto123 wrote:
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NHL wrote: If you took my s****tion at shooting only at 50mm for a month you would know the answer.
I'm really not sure why such an attitude is needed. Not all of us are able to put two and two together and get four when it comes to photography. As much as I appreciate all help (I'm not one to bite the hand), I don't need to be made to feel like a child.
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Old Sep 20, 2007, 12:42 PM   #59
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By the way, I recall that I didn't get an answer about macro modes on this camera. I didn't see any difference with it on or off like I did with my SD700 point-and-shoot. Anyone know what macro mode does on the 40D?
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Old Sep 20, 2007, 1:18 PM   #60
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Weird I didn't know there even was a Macro mode.

How close the camera focuses is a function of the lens on a DSLR, it's probably a contrast/sharpening/colour thing for in-camera JPG processing.

If you want to do Macro then you need a Macro lens.
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