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Old Sep 20, 2007, 4:13 PM   #61
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I believe that what you refer to as Macro mode is the "close-up" mode in the basic zones. The "flower setting". I do not believe that it works like the P/S cameras that actually have a macro setting as the Nikon 990 did several years ago. Will have to try it out to see what it really does. I just use a macro lens instead This may be interesting.
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Old Sep 20, 2007, 4:45 PM   #62
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Ctrack wrote:
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I believe that what you refer to as Macro mode is the "close-up" mode in the basic zones. The "flower setting". I do not believe that it works like the P/S cameras that actually have a macro setting as the Nikon 990 did several years ago. Will have to try it out to see what it really does. I just use a macro lens instead This may be interesting.
Definitely interested to see what you find.
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Old Sep 20, 2007, 9:17 PM   #63
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WilliamG wrote:
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Ctrack wrote:
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I believe that what you refer to as Macro mode is the "close-up" mode in the basic zones. The "flower setting". I do not believe that it works like the P/S cameras that actually have a macro setting as the Nikon 990 did several years ago. Will have to try it out to see what it really does. I just use a macro lens instead This may be interesting.
Definitely interested to see what you find.
If you want to take macro shots on an SLR you need to buy a macro lens. There is no macro mode.
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Old Nov 23, 2007, 4:39 PM   #64
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Hi again. I've been playing some more with my 40D, and used it to take pictures while I was in New York over Thanksgiving - of the parade. Those daytime shots came out very well with just mostly basic settings.

However, I was taking pictures in a restaurant (Aureole, for those interested! Thank goodness I wasn't paying!), and the light was pretty warm/dim since it was a nighttime occasion. Unfortunately, all my pictures came out pretty blurry/orange, except if I used the flash. However, I despise using flash because of how overexposed everything comes out. But then if I don't use flash I get blurry/orangey pictures.

What settings would one use to solve this issue? It really frustrated me to have such bad pictures. This was using the 28-135 f5.6 lens that came with the 40D kit.

Thanks all!
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Old Nov 23, 2007, 5:55 PM   #65
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open up your Fstop and increase your ISO, try using the AV mode and set your ISO higher
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Old Nov 24, 2007, 12:02 AM   #66
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Can you explain what that means in really simple terms. I apologise for my still-noob status with this camera.
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Old Dec 2, 2007, 2:12 PM   #67
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"open up your Fstop and increase your ISO, try using the AV mode and set your ISO higher"

"Open up your F stop": you need a biger hole for the light to come through (set to a "smaller number" to get the larger apature.

"Try using the AV mode": AV is one of the basic modes. AV allows you to set the apature (F stop)... the camera will set a shutter speed to match the existing light conditions with your choice of apature and ISO.

"Increase your ISO": in the Basic modes you can set your ISO ... use a higer ISO perhaps 400 or 800 or even higher.

These three things apature, shutter speed, and ISO all have trade off's (see JohnG's earlier post).

Hang in there... you are asking the right questions ...
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Old Dec 2, 2007, 3:26 PM   #68
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ScottSteven wrote:
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"open up your Fstop and increase your ISO, try using the AV mode and set your ISO higher"

"Open up your F stop": you need a biger hole for the light to come through (set to a "smaller number" to get the larger apature.

"Try using the AV mode": AV is one of the basic modes. AV allows you to set the apature (F stop)... the camera will set a shutter speed to match the existing light conditions with your choice of apature and ISO.

"Increase your ISO": in the Basic modes you can set your ISO ... use a higer ISO perhaps 400 or 800 or even higher.

These three things apature, shutter speed, and ISO all have trade off's (see JohnG's earlier post).

Hang in there... you are asking the right questions ...
Thanks for the reply. I found white-balancing made a HUGE difference to the color. I was surprised nobody mentions that very much here. I will have to play with the ISO levels. I noticed the shutter speed was much quicker with ISO 800 in dimmer rooms, and the picture quality is much better, and way less blurry.

Will tinker some more! Thanks again!
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Old Dec 3, 2007, 7:53 PM   #69
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WilliamG,

I started reading this thread because you mentioned a 40D, I just ordered mine today. I've had a passion for photography for over 30 years, so along the way I've picked up a thing or 2 myself. Throughout this thread it appears you have made some progress working out in your mind how shutter speeds and f stoprs affect the results you have been able to get. For me, it was getting it worked out in theory, and then practice practice practice. Looks like you are well on your way.

As far as iso settings, I don't know if you realize from the film days that difefrent film has different speeds. That is known as ASA. Film with an ASA of 64 or 100 will be much less "grainy" than that of ASA 800 or 1000. At the same time, the former will need much more light to produce a satisfactory image than the latter. It's all a trade-off.

An electronic sensor in a digital camera is no different in this respect. An iso of 100 is going to have much less noise than that of 800 or 1600. But again, at 100 it will need much more light to produce a satisfactory image. Again, a trade-off. Knowing this, my best advise is to experiment by taking pictures that mean nothing to you over and over at different settings, so you will be more prepared when you are out trying to get keepers.

I don't have my D40 yet, but I tried one out in the photo shop this past Friday and Saturday. The camera I had has the same lens you have. On that lens if you rotate the focus ring all the way clockwise as you look at it from behind the camera, you will see an area labelled macro. When you are taking close ups such as the flowers your wife was shooting, keep the focus in this area. Move the camera back and forth and/or use the zoom until you fill the frame with the shots you want. The results can be dramatic, and it's a favorite form of phtography for me. But again, there is a ton to learn as far as flash, clsoe up "filters" (these are actually lenses that screw on to the lens like a filter) etc.

If I were you, I would read and and ask questions, try my best to get a concept clear in my mind, and then shoot away to test the theory. You have a great advantage in that you get instant results with digital. Can you imagine having to wait to get your film developed and pictures printed to get the results of your testing?!! Just go for it!!!


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Old Dec 3, 2007, 8:05 PM   #70
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dmiles wrote:
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WilliamG,

I started reading this thread because you mentioned a 40D, I just ordered mine today. I've had a passion for photography for over 30 years, so along the way I've picked up a thing or 2 myself. Throughout this thread it appears you have made some progress working out in your mind how shutter speeds and f stoprs affect the results you have been able to get. For me, it was getting it worked out in theory, and then practice practice practice. Looks like you are well on your way.

As far as iso settings, I don't know if you realize from the film days that difefrent film has different speeds. That is known as ASA. Film with an ASA of 64 or 100 will be much less "grainy" than that of ASA 800 or 1000. At the same time, the former will need much more light to produce a satisfactory image than the latter. It's all a trade-off.

An electronic sensor in a digital camera is no different in this respect. An iso of 100 is going to have much less noise than that of 800 or 1600. But again, at 100 it will need much more light to produce a satisfactory image. Again, a trade-off. Knowing this, my best advise is to experiment by taking pictures that mean nothing to you over and over at different settings, so you will be more prepared when you are out trying to get keepers.

I don't have my D40 yet, but I tried one out in the photo shop this past Friday and Saturday. The camera I had has the same lens you have. On that lens if you rotate the focus ring all the way clockwise as you look at it from behind the camera, you will see an area labelled macro. When you are taking close ups such as the flowers your wife was shooting, keep the focus in this area. Move the camera back and forth and/or use the zoom until you fill the frame with the shots you want. The results can be dramatic, and it's a favorite form of phtography for me. But again, there is a ton to learn as far as flash, clsoe up "filters" (these are actually lenses that screw on to the lens like a filter) etc.

If I were you, I would read and and ask questions, try my best to get a concept clear in my mind, and then shoot away to test the theory. You have a great advantage in that you get instant results with digital. Can you imagine having to wait to get your film developed and pictures printed to get the results of your testing?!! Just go for it!!!

Thanks for the reply! I'm sure you'll love the 40D. It's wonderful, despite my amateurish usage with it. The more I use it, the more makes sense. Some things, though, don't make sense. Can you explain about this macro thing on the camera? You mentioned something about moving the focus ring, but I don't understand..... There's a macro setting on the actual camera?

Also, this whole flash business. Why do people use flash? When I was at the wedding last week of my friend, the pro photographer was using flash the whole time. When I used flash, the picture comes out massively overexposed. Can you fix that overexposure in postproduction, like Photoshop?

Also, f-stops are killing me. Need...to...study....more!

Thanks!

**EDIT**

I see the macro on the lens. However, I have to move pretty far away from the object for it to be in focus, sadly. I think I need a better close-up lens.
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