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Old Jan 30, 2008, 7:44 PM   #1
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I am curious if there is a way to make multiple exposures (in camera) on the Canon 30D or 40D. I know it can be done in Photoshop but would like to be able to do so in camera. Any ideas? I think I have read the manuals completely and carefully but find nothing.
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Old Jan 30, 2008, 9:17 PM   #2
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i am thinking in the lines of NIKON here.. NOPE u cannot make multiple exposure that u can make like the onein D200 and hoepfully in D300

Instead the way i do it is use the 6fps in 40D and take 3 shots with bracketing. That gives me multiple exposure

In case of Nikon D200 or hopefully D300, in camera software can produed different exposures if i am right

if i am wrong jsut forgive me right ??



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Old Jan 30, 2008, 9:56 PM   #3
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Yeah, I don't think Canons do thagt like the Nikons do. Not sure why Nikon even messes around with it what with photoshop and all.

I know an A Amstutz. You wouldn't happen to be in a Baroque Opera production right now, would you?


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Old Jan 30, 2008, 10:44 PM   #4
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David French wrote:
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Yeah, I don't think Canons do thagt like the Nikons do. Not sure why Nikon even messes around with it what with photoshop and all.
Becuase in camera double exposers are much better and easier for handling mixed lighting situations and light painting than doing it in photoshop. Same reason they are still making perspective correction (shift) lenses. Photoshop is great but its still best to get it in camera.
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Old Jan 30, 2008, 11:04 PM   #5
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"Becuase in camera double exposers are much better and easier for handling mixed lighting situations and light painting than doing it in photoshop."

Totally agree on the TS lenses, but I'm not following you here. Could you explain the benefits of in-camera multiple exposure vs. similar photoshop techniques?
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Old Jan 30, 2008, 11:40 PM   #6
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OK lest say you are hired to photograph an office building at night. The outside is lit with mercury vapor flood lights the inside with floresants and the statue in front is going to need fome flash becuase its not lit very well at all.


Now you could take three differant pics at differant white balance settings with one light sours turned on at a time. and combind them is PS. the problem here is that the light sourses will overlap and you will have to make compromizes is those areas. and it would take hours of masking and adjusting.

or you could take tree differant exposures at the same white balance using filter to corect the color of each light source.
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Old Jan 31, 2008, 1:42 AM   #7
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And that would differ how from taking 3 RAW exposures, setting the WB to the same value and applying filters in PS?

Not saying it's not a cool feature, but I have yet to hear of a situation where you can do something in the camera that you couldn't do as well or better in PS.

I think the Pentax K10D has it too.
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Old Jan 31, 2008, 2:17 AM   #8
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I'm still not seeing it. I'm asking because I think I'm probably wrong and I want to learn something.
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Old Jan 31, 2008, 9:28 AM   #9
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peripatetic wrote:
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And that would differ how from taking 3 RAW exposures, setting the WB to the same value and applying filters in PS?

Not saying it's not a cool feature, but I have yet to hear of a situation where you can do something in the camera that you couldn't do as well or better in PS.

I think the Pentax K10D has it too.
It differs in that it would be easier less time consuming and most likely the results would be better. I love PS I have been using it for years for photo correction as well as photo illustrations. But there are indeed things that can be done in camera that cannot be done as well or better in PS. Now you have heard of a couple.

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Old Jan 31, 2008, 9:28 AM   #10
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David French wrote:
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I'm still not seeing it. I'm asking because I think I'm probably wrong and I want to learn something.
First I must apologize as I realized I was late for work half way through writing my post last night so I cut short.

In my example above you have three light sources all with their own color temperature/white balance. As well as their own exposure value. If you tried to take one shot you would only have the correct color and exposure for one light source in the image. If you take three images (one for each light source) and combine them in photo shop you have to do more work and may still have off color areas to contend with. But if you take three exposures on the same image using filters on the lens to change all three light sources to the same color temperature/white balance resulting in a perfect mix. Of coarse this requires that you can turn on and off the lights at will and that you use a tripod so that each exposure is perfectly registered. If you try this you must also make sure you adjust the shutter speed for each exposure and not the aperture.

Another example is light painting. This is usually done with a long exposure rather than multiple exposures but some times that is not possible. Imagine that you need to take a picture of a large interior such as a church. The lighting is inadequate and unflattering. So you must provide your own. This would require a dozen flash units. But you don't have a dozen flash units. So instead you use one flash unit a dozen times. Lighting a different area with each exposure. Again you could take a dozen images and combine them in Photoshop but that would be even more work and would require one hell of a computer. Further more doing it in camera you can examine the image on the spot and decide if you got it right or not and do it again.

These techniques as well as perspective and controlled DOF issues are why much of the professional architectural and industrial photography today is still done on 4X5 film cameras.

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