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Old Feb 27, 2008, 11:22 AM   #11
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Old Feb 27, 2008, 11:23 AM   #12
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Not sure what size they need to be (when posted on this site).

-V
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Old Feb 27, 2008, 5:52 PM   #13
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Great stuff. Now you've dared me to measure 10 feet, take shots within the range, and outside the range. I can use my tripod to rule out any shake. That should prove it out.

Also, on that site, I plugged in F/4, 70mm (thinking about the 70-200 F/4), and subject 50 feet away. Based on that calculator, I have a mile (25ft) to try to get a focused shot:

Depthoffield Nearlimit 40.5ft Farlimit 65.4ft Total 24.9ft
-Vinnie
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Old Feb 27, 2008, 7:02 PM   #14
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kc571 wrote:
Quote:
Also, on that site, I plugged in F/4, 70mm (thinking about the 70-200 F/4), and subject 50 feet away. Based on that calculator, I have a mile (25ft) to try to get a focused shot:

-Vinnie

AH, but here's why this is so difficult. At the settings you mentioned above:

1. your backround will also be in focus which is bad.

and

2. Your subject will be small in the frame making critical focus very difficult. And you'll have to crop down quite a bit and you'll lose detail.

A key to getting sharp action shots is to fill the frame with your subject - you want at least 2/3 of the frame filled - more if you can.

That's how you get sharpness and detail:



Also - one other piece of advice - get lower when you shoot. Kneel or sit on the ground so you're shooting strait at your subject or a little bit up. You want to avoid shooting down on your subject.

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Old Feb 27, 2008, 8:14 PM   #15
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What a double edged sword. You want a small dof, to get the blur, but then you have little to focus on. Oh fine line, where art thou?

So how do you combine both, without spending zillions on a lens? And I'd be wasting money now anyway, b/c I don't know how to use it.

Sounds like, in good lighting, you can get away with 2.8 or 4, and still have a good amount to focus on. In poor lighting, you'll need a 2.8 or better due to the "lighting".

How can you tell when your shot is in focus (in the viewfinder)? Does that red dot stay solid? I remember mine blinking.


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Old Feb 27, 2008, 10:16 PM   #16
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How can you tell when your shot is in focus (in the viewfinder)? Does that red dot stay solid? I remember mine blinking.

Thats a tough one. only when asked specifically about the red dot do i ask myself what happens when i try to focus. Coz i am looking at the subject rather than the blinking light. I trust my eyes more than the camera and have so far never bothered to investigate.

In the Non Servo mode, or the normal AF mode, the focus light will blink for a second.

In the AI-Servo mode, no red light wil blink. instead a small green light for focus confirmation will almost be blinking if noticed properly.

using AI-Servo makes sense since u can release the shutter anytime u want to and based on what u see instead of waiting for the camera to lock focus
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