Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Canon EOS dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Mar 6, 2008, 5:16 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
dg27's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: New York
Posts: 154
Default

I read recently of GPS devices that sit in your hot shoe and add GPS data to the metadata. Wondering if anyone has any expereince with these. I shoot either in New York [where from the reviews I read these would not be effective due to many tall buildings] or in pretty remote areas of places like Brazil [where one might have a tough time finding a satellite].

Just curious because for $150 I consider getting one if they really work. But the reviews seem pretty spotty.

I edit in Photoshop CS3; also not sure whether the metadata would be compatible either.

And advice/comments would be appreciated.

dg
dg27 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Mar 7, 2008, 5:50 AM   #2
NHL
Senior Member
 
NHL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: 39.18776, -77.311353333333
Posts: 11,545
Default

Do you mean one of this (i.e. sit in your pocket)?
http://photofinder.atpinc.com/what.html
http://news.sel.sony.com/en/assets/Gpscs1ka/index.html

... and not a regular GPS unit that need to be connected to the camera correct?
NHL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 7, 2008, 6:16 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
dg27's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: New York
Posts: 154
Default

Actually, I first read about it on p 162 of Scott Kelby's The Digital Photography Book, Volume 2, where he refers to "incredibly lightweight GPS units that sit your camer's hot shoe... ." He does not mention a specific brand or model, but then mentions the Sony:

Sony GPS-CS1KA at sonystyle.com

which does not connect to the camera.

I have no idea which is better or if the hot shoe models are compatible with Canons (I have a Rebel XTi and a Powershot A80).

dg
dg27 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 7, 2008, 9:54 AM   #4
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

These devices work by storing log files with date/time stamps and GPS coordinates. Some have an interval you can set, and some default to a given log interval.

Then, you use software to match up the log file to the images based on their date/time stamps, and the software writes the coordianates to the image's metadata. You also see features that allow you to correct for date/time settings differences with some of the software so that it finds the closest match in the GPS log data.

I did see a model that can work on a hotshoe in a Canon with the ability to only log when the camera takes a photo (it's just using the flash trigger from the hotshoe contacts to tell the GPS unit when to log the current coordinates. The one I saw wasn't designed specifically for Canon (it works with any camera that has a hotshoe it can fit into). Watching the contacts for a flash trigger is as much communication as you get with the current Canon models with anything I've seen.

Nikon has some cameras that can interface to some GPS units now (so that the camera can update the image's metadata in real time). But, AFAIK, you can't do that with any Canon cameras yet.

Another issue you an run into is the variety of log files used by GPS units. But, you can get software to convert log file formats if you need to (for example, you prefer to use someone elses software for updating image metadata from the log file a GPS produces).

Here's someone with some reviews of a couple of models:

http://scilib.typepad.com/science_li...gps_logge.html

The one NHL posted a link to is interesting (the one that didn't require a PC to match up the GPS logs with your images). But, it's going to work on the same principle (matches up the date/time stamps in it's log file to the date/time stamps of the images, then updates their metadata with logged coordinates for the closest time stamp.

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 7, 2008, 10:13 AM   #5
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

JimC wrote:
Quote:
Another issue you an run into is the variety of log files used by GPS units. But, you can get software to convert log file formats if you need to (for example, you prefer to use someone elses software for updating image metadata from the log file a GPS produces).
Here's an example. Many GPS receivers have the ability to log track points (even though they're not marketed towards image tagging). So, you can use free software to convert their formats into something other software can use to tag your photos. Here's one example of free software you can use for conversion. This page shows the formats supported:

http://www.gpsbabel.org/htmldoc-1.3.5/The_Formats.html

Even a free image management tool I use when running Linux has the ability to geotag images using GPX log files.

The main difference with some of the newer GPS devices is that they're being marketed towards use for geotagging images, with software included designed for that purpose.

Scroll down on this page and you'll see using GPX log files mentioned in the new Kipi Plugins section, with screen captures of it working with Google Earth.

http://www.digikam.org/?q=about/features09x

Here's the list of new features they added in some of the plugins (note the GPX log file support).
  • Lossless transformations in JPEG pictures[/*]
  • Albums archives on CD/DVD[/*]
  • HTML export to remote Gallery[/*]
  • Send pictures by email[/*]
  • Add GPS coordinates to images by synchronizing them with a GPX files (created by GPS receivers and/or GPS tools), or by manually editing the longitude/latitude/altitude or also by using Google Map capabilities.[/*]
  • Export to remote FlickR[/*]
  • Calendar creation wizard[/*]
  • MPEG encoder[/*]
  • Acquire image (eg. with a flat scanner)[/*]
  • Raw image converter[/*]
  • Remote gallery export[/*]
  • Adjust time and date[/*]
  • Find images[/*]
  • Print wizard[/*]
  • Set wallpaper[/*]
  • Edit Pictures EXIF/IPTC Metadata[/*]
  • Create slideshow[/*]
  • Images batch processing[/*]

[align=right] [/align]

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 7, 2008, 2:36 PM   #6
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 2
Default

JimC wrote:
Quote:
These devices work by storing log files with date/time stamps and GPS coordinates. Some have an interval you can set, and some default to a given log interval.

Then, you use software to match up the log file to the images based on their date/time stamps, and the software writes the coordianates to the image's metadata. You also see features that allow you to correct for date/time settings differences with some of the software so that it finds the closest match in the GPS log data.

Here's someone with some reviews of a couple of models:

http://scilib.typepad.com/science_li...gps_logge.html
Thanks for pointing to my review. The DG-100 is not a bad little device. The Sony I wouldn't use these days, it's quite dated as the GPS field has been moving very rapidly. Newer loggers have much better GPS sensors and many of them come with very good Windows software now.

The complete list of reviews is at

http://scilib.typepad.com/techreviews/reviews-list.html

I like the small GPS loggers, most of them are sub-$100 and perform their tasks very well. There are fewer to choose from if you're on a Mac. The main one I use these days is the Qstarz BT-Q1000P (Platinum), I'm working on a review of it.

If you're just going for a short photography session, your cellphone or your cell + Bluetooth GPS may also be able to log tracks, but typically this runs the cell batteries down very quickly.
rakerman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 7, 2008, 2:47 PM   #7
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

You should try to post more often. I couldn't help but notice that this was only your second post in 5 1/2 years. ;-)

I'll watch for your review of the Quartz model you're using now.

As fast as prices are dropping on GPS receivers, I suspect we'll be seeing a lot of new tools that are geared more towards geotagging images soon.


JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 7, 2008, 2:50 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
dg27's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: New York
Posts: 154
Default

Thanks--this is all very helpful!--dg
dg27 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 7, 2008, 3:06 PM   #9
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

rakerman wrote:
Quote:
There are fewer to choose from if you're on a Mac.
You can download a version of GPSBabel that can run on a Mac to convert your log files to a format that a program that runs on a Mac can use to tag your photos, as long as you have a way to get the files from a given receiver and have a program than can use a supported file type after you convert the log to it.

Here's a download page (you'll see a dmg in the list for a Mac).

GPS Babel 1.3.4 download links

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 7:31 PM.