Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Canon EOS dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Apr 17, 2008, 11:51 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 8
Default

I am a new user of a canon xti and new DSLR user and will be going to Tropicana Field (indoors) to see a Tampa Bay baseball game. In the past I had a canon s2is for taking photos. My problem is, when I changed to a faster shutter speed to capture players in motion the picture was dark. Outdoors was not a problem , just at the indoor stadium.

I will be getting a sigma70-300mm f4-5.6 APO DG (fits my budget)for closeups. Will I have the same problem catching motion. If so what settings can I use to compensate. Thanks.

Rich
guru46 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Apr 17, 2008, 12:18 PM   #2
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Yes, you''ll have the same problems.

The shutter speed needed for proper exposure depends on the lighting, the ISO speed (how sensitive the sensor or film is to light) and the aperture (smaller f/stop numbers represent larger aperture openings to let in more light).

If you try to use a shutter speed that's too fast for the lighting, ISO speed and aperture (f/stop setting), you'll get underexposed (too dark) images. The camera needs to keep the shutter open long enough to expose the sensor or film.

I'd use Av (Aperture Priority), setting the lens to the widest available aperture (smallest available f/stop number), and use ISO 1600 for starters.

Even at ISO 1600 (the highest your XTi goes), you're likely to have a lot of motion blur trying to shoot an indoor game using a lens that only has f/5.6 available on it's long end. So, you'll probably need to take them when the players are still. You may also need a monopod to help out with blur from camera shake. Each time you double the ISO speed, the camera can use shutter speeds twice as fast for the same lighting and aperture setting.

You really want a lens with f/2.8 available throughout the focal range for something like night sports under the lights, and even then, ISO 1600 may not be quite sensitive enough for a high percentage of photos without motion blur, depending on the lighting. For example, you'd want a Canon or Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 if you can get close enough, or a Sigma 120-300mm f/2.8 (pricey) for a better chance at keepers in those conditions.

f/2.8 is exactly 4 times as bright as f/5.6 (the widest available aperture your lens has when zoomed in much), allowing shutter speeds 4 times as fast for the same lighting and ISO speed.

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 18, 2008, 10:04 AM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 8
Default

Jim----Thanks for your help. Maybe I should wait and get a f2.8 lensand be much happier.

Rich
guru46 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 18, 2008, 10:21 AM   #4
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

The lastest II version of the Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 EX DG Macro HSM will run you around $799 at dealers like adorama and B&H.

http://www.sigmaphoto.com/lenses/len...mp;navigator=3

Or, the Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L would be another option ($1140 right now at B&H).

But, you'd want to be as close as possible since you'd be limited to 200mm.

Some of our Sports shooters like the Sigma 120-300mm f/2.8 EX DG HSM. It's got a bit more reach and would be better suited for baseball under the lights. But, then you're taking a big jump in size, weight and cost. It's $2699 right now at B&H.

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 18, 2008, 10:40 AM   #5
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 8,529
Default

Rich,

There are really several issues here:

1. What type of camera / lens will Tropicana let you bring in? Not an easy question to answer - first you have to find out what the OFFICIAL policy is - then you have to deal with the workers at the stadium who may be more or less strict. It varies stadium by stadium. In Cleveland, they don't have an issue with me bringing in a 100-400L but other stadiums don't allow DSLRs at all with a bunch in between. So before you plunk down any money on a lens - find out what their policy is.

2. 200mm is way too short for a major league stadium. 200mm is too short if you were actually in the photo pit much less from the stands. So I don't recommend a 70-200mm option. With good seats, 400mm is decent, 300mm is really only enough for very close action.

Which brings us to the point of your question - proper exposure. Here's exposure information for Tropican field:

Quote:
Exposures were around 1/640s ISO 800 f/2.8 at home plate, but fell off 1/3-2/3 of a stop in the far reaches of the outfield .
So, at 5.6 ISO 1600 that would give you a shutter speed of 1/320 at the plate. Forget about freezing a swing or the ball (you want around 1/2000 for that). You'll get some motion blur in hands / feet running. You'll also find focus is quite a bit slugish so you'd have to lock on and track your subject for a second plus - don't expect to acquire/fire right away.

You should also realize the sigma lens you're considering is soft above 200mm.

It's a great budget lens if you want something to shoot your kids tee-ball and soccer but in those lighting conditions and those distances you're not likely to get many good shots.

In the end, it's up to you - but the odds are definitely stacked against getting good shots - unless you have fantastic seats. In which case you could get some half-way decent shots but not many. IF they'll let you bring the camera in.
JohnG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 18, 2008, 11:05 AM   #6
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 8
Default

John

Tropicana is good about bringing cameras and bags. I've been there before with my s2is and a teleconverter lens. They just look in your bag before entry and go.

Thanks for the info.

Rich
guru46 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 13, 2008, 7:29 AM   #7
Junior Member
 
OilerFan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 3
Default

I'm not sure about your event, but I don't think the lighting will be much different from that of a hockey game, and I go to a lot of those. I typically photograph at my games and find that I can shoot at ISO 1600, open the lense wide open, and shoot at a shutter speed of 1/160th or so. It's fast enough to stop most action, but a long enough exposure to get the shot without being too dark.

What I don't get is the depth of field, but this hasn't typically been a problem. Usually, when you're shooting a player or two, you want to highlight that player and so if there are players across ice, it's okay with me if they're not in focus.


OilerFan is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 7:08 PM.