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Old Sep 25, 2003, 9:01 PM   #1
da
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Default How is 300D imaging sensor protected?

Hi ,

I am considering getting the 300D, but was concerned about the imaging sensor getting contaminated with dirt or dust each time we change lenses.

Is there any protection for the sensor ?

Thanks in advance,
--da
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Old Sep 27, 2003, 2:06 PM   #2
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Default Sensor Protected

Your concerns are exacly mine also. I got to handle the Digital Reblel today and love the camera but am concerned about the dust issues. What I have been told is that you are not cleaning the sensor, but are cleaning the anti alasing filter in front of the sensor. How fragile this or how easy it would be to damage the camera I don't know. Why they don't just put a peice of ED glass in front of this is beyond me, it would then be no more difficult than cleaning the front element of a lens. I have been trying to find out all I can about cleaning these things, some say it is easy and some say send it in. I have also been told that the CMOS sensors are less prone to this problem (they still can get it) than are CCD type cameras. In any case it looks like this is a problem we have to learn to deal with with these types of cameras. Oly is suppose to have a built in cleaning function on their new E-1 but nobody knows if it will really work yet and the camera and lens is over twice the price of the D300/D-Rebel. I don't know about you but this is still just a hobby with me (although a big time one) and $2000-$2500 for a camera is a bit much for me.

Maybe some of the 10D owners out there could tell us their experinces with sensor cleaning?
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Old Sep 27, 2003, 11:36 PM   #3
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The Canon dSLR cameras with CMOS imagers have the least problem with dirt and other contaminants of all dSLR cameras. The D30 and D60 are almost famous for their lack of dirty imagers. I think it is also something to do with the fact that CMOS imagers have much less of a surface charge than their CCD counterparts.

The only approved way of cleaning them is using a small blower brush and do not actually make contact with the lowpass filter.

Use common sense when changing lenses. Keep camera body pointed down, don't do it in blowing/dusty conditions and keep your lenses as clean as possible and properly capped when not on the camera.

-Steve
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Old Sep 28, 2003, 7:31 AM   #4
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Also note that body cap and lense backend cap are made so that if not in use they can be put together like a box, keeping their inside protected from bag dust aswell.

Still I also have some weird problem, recently swapped my new 10D for another one because of deadpixel, this model has 'only' a 2 hot pixel defects. I'm willing to believe that such is a very extra ordinary to have twice such faults with a new camera twice. (The shop is willing to exchange this one as well.) With both cameras I found also a tiny body flints inside from fabricage.... Strange, maybe also part of my rare experience with the 10D.

My tip is as soon as you have your Canon 10D or Rebel in hands, gently wiggle it upside down take body cap of and inspect for any blacks flints around the lense mount.
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Old Sep 28, 2003, 1:22 PM   #5
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Default Steve, your right but a question

Steve: You are correct that you should first try and blow off the dust with a bulb blower. From what I have been able to find out you should never use compressed air or anythng like that because they can deposit oil on the low pass filter. However what do you do if the dust won't 'blow off'? Some sites (include Phi'ls at DPreview) talk about using pec-pads on a swab device and a special solvent made of methonal to clean the thing if you can't blow the dust free. I know from your site you have a D60 so have you ever had to do this? Is the low pass filter that fragile that the above would damage it. If it isn't that fragle could you use a small anti-static brush (fine soft bristles) that you might brush the font element of a lens with to clean? It seems to me that the camera companies have put us in a box here with the dSLR. The things will need to be cleaned but no 'good' method exists to do it, short of sending the camera back to them, and I was told that most of the time they don't clean it for free and they often don't get it cleaned.

This is the one thing that has kept me from a dSLR till now. For us consurer digital types wanting to badly move up to a dSLR, is this really not the problem we think it is? I don't make enough money that I could afford to replace a Digital Rebel if I damaged it during cleaning but nor do I want to have the camera out of service for weeks at time waiting for Canon to clean it. From a 'real world' standpoint, how much of a problem is this 'dust issue'.
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Old Sep 30, 2003, 8:45 PM   #6
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Default Cleaning the Digital Rebel Sensor

As a follow up to my post. The management club at our company has purchased a Digital Rebel for use at its functions. Two days ago my boss came by, plunked down a camera bag and told me to 'take it home and try it out for a few days'. Inside was the new Digital Rebel.

So while getting to use it for a little bit of time, I noticed in several shots that there was a dust spot in the sky at one area of every photo. Since this camera was brand new I assume it came from Canon that way. So I got out the manual, a blower bulb and the dust is now gone along with some of my worry over this issue.

Overall I was impressed with the camera. My only concerns were that I felt the view finder was a little darker than I am use to on a film SLR and sometimes it hunted for a focus lock, but most of the time it focus real quick. I also thought the photos at ISO 400-800 were really as good as some reviews have said they are. I would rate the camera as a 8 out of 10.
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Old Oct 2, 2003, 12:49 PM   #7
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Bill, dust spots can be on either side of the lens. If not... time to go in cmos cleaning mode.

Today I swapped 'my' camera (also provided by employer) again and finally I got a 10D with perfect cmos (unbelievable bad pixel happened to me twice in a row with brand new camera, shop nor Canon had ever heard of such misfortune). I'm very happy now, it is quite a good camera.

While being in the shop I bought a speck grabber pro (kinetronics). Tip is made of sort of same material as hair remover roler for cloth (slightly adhesive rubber/plastic that cleans easy with tap water). I tried it on a lens and dust at the opening of camera body and it works nice and gentle...
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Old Oct 2, 2003, 1:09 PM   #8
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Default CMOS Cleaning

Mathilde: The dust spot was on the CMOS sensor. I was able to blow it off with a blower bulb although I would like to find one that is larger and more powerful than the small one I have. I couldn't see the dust so I don't think that spec grabber would have helped in that case. I would suspect (from using the camera now for several days) that as long as you are careful on changing of the lens this will not be much of an issue (at least not as much worry about it as I first had). I would store the camera with lens unles it was for extended storage, then I think I would remove the lens and use the body cap. This is a company camera but I am planning on purchasing one more towards the end of the year. I want to see what Oly's E-1 is really going to be like (yeah I know it is alot more expensive and these two cameras are not in the same class) and I was hoping to hear about the Oly prosumer (I hate that word) version of the camera due out in early 2004. Overall however I think the DR is great, espically at a $999 price point. It is not perfect, the 10d is much more feature rich but it can sure get the job done.

The only thing I have noticed as a real negitive is that the camera seems to hunt a lot for focus. I have had several cases (using AP or SP mode) where it could not obtain a focus lock on a landscape setting. I was able to get it to do so by paning the camera slowly, then it locked on. Since it was a landscape I could recompose with no problem. The other item is that it seems to select the top most focus point (of the seven) even when the center point is dead on the subject you want. Haven't figured that one out yet. I also don't like the little red dots to show you which point is being used. I understand the 10d lights up the entire square, the would be better and should have been carried over the DR.

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Old Oct 2, 2003, 1:33 PM   #9
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Here are detailed, and from the feedback excellent, instructions on how to clean your image sensor: http://www.pbase.com/copperhill/ccd_cleaning

To quote from http://www.dpreview.com/forums/read....essage=5602180

I found the following tutorial on the Web and would like to bring it to your attention.

http://www.pbase.com/copperhill/ccd_cleaning

NO GUARANTEES, but this is the best sensor cleaning method I've seen so far that doesn't involve sending the camera in to the Factory Service Center. I am sending a copy of this message to our Service Managers for their review.

Your comments are welcome.

Best Regards,

Chuck Westfall
Director/Technical Information Dept.
Camera Division/Canon U.S.A., Inc.
TEL: +1-516-328-4828
FAX: +1-516-328-4809
E-Mail: [email protected]


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Old Oct 2, 2003, 7:42 PM   #10
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Bill100, this hunting for focus also happens with the film EOS 1000 and 10D. It occurs if the camera can choose from several focus points, with every slight movement the camera switches between "a tree, and then back to uncle X, to the glass in the window, the bench were uncle X is sitting on". As far as I know * only helps to fixate exposure....Having 2 different EOS cameras I'm a bit confused there.

Barthold, thanks for the link on swabs.
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