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Old Oct 15, 2003, 12:11 PM   #21
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I use a circular polarizer. I like being able to turn the ring on the polarizer and lighten or darken the sky, depending on its orientation.

Eric, the images in my galleries are fairly well compressed, and not the full size. Thus you might see a few small artifacts. If you want to see a particular one, let me know and I'll get you the full sized version.

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Old Oct 15, 2003, 12:59 PM   #22
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barthold

When you use the polarizer filter with the 17-40L, can you still put the lens hood on it? What filter do you have? Does the hood attach to the lens (i.e. go over the filter) or does the filter get in the way? What about the lens cap? Should I worry about getting a filter which has threads? I was originally looking at either a Hoya S-HMC circular polarizier (a bit over $100, not thrilled with that) or a B&W MrC circular polarizer (those are even more than the Hoya, so that is probably right out!) But a web site I was reading on warned that on some lenses you can't put the hood on when the filter is on. I expect to keep the filter on 80% of the time, so it conflicting with the hood or cap disturbes me.

I really like some of those in the Utah gallery. The second "Sunrise over Arches" has a simplicity that I like.

Eric
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Old Oct 15, 2003, 1:58 PM   #23
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I believe most lenses now especially all Canon use bayonet for hood so the filter will screw on normally... Check into Heliopan as well, the more expensive one can combine a polarizer and some other effect such as warming as well since it's not a good idea to stack filters on a WA (ie they might vignette and decrease the quality of the lens)

http://www.2filters.com./prices/specials.html
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Old Oct 15, 2003, 2:07 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eric s
What is the diff between a circular and non (linear?) polarizer? Or maybe someone can suggest a link to a website which describes proper (circular) polarizer use?

Eroc
Here is an article that describes polarizing filters. http://www.adorama.com/catalog.tpl?op=article_022403
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Old Oct 15, 2003, 2:41 PM   #25
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Eric,

You can use the polarizer and the hood at the same time. The hood screws on the outside of the lens, not into the filter thread. Thus no problem in that respect (same design as your 28-135). If you get a circular polarizer with front thread you can also still stick the lens cap on it. I don't believe you need to get a special WA polarizer (which typically does not have a front thread) since you have a 10D camera.

From searches on dpreview I found that people like the B&W or Hoya filters best (bit over $100). I have a WA polarizer filter without front-thread, which I don't like too much since I cannot put the lens cap on it. Thus I'm looking at a new filter myself too.

BTW, I'm sticking with Canon lenses. I jus don't want to deal with a different brand lens not working correctly on my Canon camera (now or in the future). I'm planning on filling out my lens set, and then sending the whole setup to Canon for proper AF calibration. Plus, it could be that Canon lenses will keep their value better on the used market than other brands. I know that others have completely different opinions (NHL :-)), and this is not meant in any way to say they are wrong, or something silly like that. Its just my way of doing things.

Barthold

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Old Oct 15, 2003, 2:53 PM   #26
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Quote:
I have a WA polarizer filter without front-thread, which I don't like too much since I cannot put the lens cap on it. Thus I'm looking at a new filter myself too.
I have a B&W 82mm without front thread and it does come with a black lens cap!

... it also grabs both layers of the ring so it won't rotate and you can use this rubber lens cap to screw it on the lens as well (some German efficiency :lol: !)
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Old Oct 15, 2003, 2:56 PM   #27
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NHL, how does the cap fit on the filter? Do the sides of the cap slide over the filter, instead of it clamping inside of the front-thread? How well does it stick?

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Old Oct 15, 2003, 2:57 PM   #28
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It goes on the outside kind of like a Tupperware lid...
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Old Oct 15, 2003, 6:00 PM   #29
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Well, as for the value I think that is a fact... not personal opinion. Canon lenses hold a higher % value in resale.

As to which is better, many of them are close enough that its more a matter of personal taste/opinion.

Thanks for the info on the hood (both of you) I was worred a bit about that (especially since I have no way of checking!)

I only get B&W and Hoya. They people at dpreview really like the Super HMS. The company I like doesn't sell the "H" vesion, but they do sell the S-MC (super multi-coated?) and a B&W multi-coated. Both around $100 (the highest/best coated in each brand is really expensive. The B&W is almost $200!!!)

I didn't realize that the lens cap grabs the threads (just looked at the 28-135, now that I'm at home.) If I can't get a lens cover, I'll have to see if they have any caps like the one NHL got with his 82mm. If that stays on well, it sounds like a great solution to the problem.

kenww
Thanks for that link, I'll check it out right now.

Thanks again everyone for this great info! One last question.

NHL mentioned that sometimes you have to use a circular polarizer because if you don't you can break metering. I don't mind getting one even if I don't have to... but is there any problems if I do that I should watch out for? They are expensive, I wouldn't want to get one that is "incompatable" (like the regular polarizer could be.)

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Old Oct 15, 2003, 7:49 PM   #30
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Quote:
Well, as for the value I think that is a fact... not personal opinion. Canon lenses hold a higher % value in resale.
Well as an investor myself... you know what they say about diversify your holdings! :lol: :lol: :lol:

...and I'm pretty good at this, as it stand I'm @ 50/50 right now:
o Sigma 70-200 f/2.8 EX APO HSM
o Canon EF 28-135 f/3.5-5.6 IS USM
o Sigma 17-35 f/2.8-4 EX HSM
o Canon EF 85 f/1.2L USM

Judging by the above order I should be looking @ a Sigma 12-24 or 50-500mm next, but then I don't sell: I collect my old gears! :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:



Quote:
you have to use a circular polarizer because if you don't you can break metering.
It's not just the metering but a linear polarizer interferes with the AF system as well... This is a known fact even on film cameras. To be safe get a circular polarizer it will work in all cameras. The other camera that I still have, the D7, uses it CCD as AF and metering is not affected by polarization!
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