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Old Oct 22, 2008, 10:31 PM   #31
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If you're shooting in JPEG mode, you're going to get soft pictures. Bump up your sharpness to about 7 and snap a few pictures or shoot in RAW and don't be afraid to boost sharpness. Unless you get crazy you won't add significant noise or artifacts.
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Old Oct 24, 2008, 5:24 PM   #32
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Thx, but at this point all I need is the sharp picture at the first place. Of course there is whole bunch of methods that should do it, like forget about JPEG, use single instead multiple AF points, or even disable live viewing (the retailer's advise), but none of them really works. I insist : why in case of Sony DSC R-1 I can use any modes and everything is OK?
Attached is the proof. First picture has been taken with Canon and the second one wit Sony. In both cases I was using Tripod and self-timer to avoid any movements and macro mode. I used crop tool just to avoid large files
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Old Oct 24, 2008, 5:25 PM   #33
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Sony file
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Old Oct 25, 2008, 2:41 AM   #34
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It's possible for the shots above that you were inside the minimum focus distance for the lens. Which (if true) suggests that you must have been using AI Servo focus mode. Remember AI servo is shutter priority - the camera will take a picture whether it gets a focus lock or not.

Can you get any sharp pictures when focussing manually?That should tell you whether it's an AF issue or simply a camera/lens issue.

It is of course possible (though very unlikely) that your dealer just got a whole batch of broken cameras.

The R1's lens is MUCH better than the Canon kit lens of course, and the sensor almost as big, so there shouldn't be very large differences in DOF between the two cameras.

It is difficult to explain what's going on here, as you are clearly not a novice photographer. But you're not really going about tracking down the problem very scientifically. You need to isolate the variables one at a time and make comparisons as you change just a single variable.

So the first thing to do is to switch off the AF and try to get some sharp shots using manual focus. If you can't get sharp shots manually then there is a lens or camera problem. If you can get sharp shots manually then you need to further investigate the AF system.
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Old Oct 25, 2008, 5:14 AM   #35
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The makernote metadata is still showing that no AF points were selected for that Canon shot. My guess is that it focused on the closest figurine (the one on the right that you've got mostly cropped out).

I can see from an embedded thumbnail that more figurines were in the image before your crop, and your larger sample seems to show that it probably locked focus on the one closest to the camera (where you can just make out the sharper portion of the material in the clothing on the closest figurine after your cropping, even though the entire figurine on the right side of that shot is visible in one of the embedded thumbnails).

I'd select the Center Focus point, half press the shutter button and make sure it locks on what you want it to, paying attention to the AF point that lights up before pressing the shutter button the rest of the way down (or use AF lock to make sure it sticks for your tests). Then, see what happens. It looks like it probably decided to pick the closest figurine from what I can see of the EXIF and embedded thumbnail, since that portion of your crop is much sharper. Here's the thumbnail showing the image prior to your crop.

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Old Oct 25, 2008, 8:16 AM   #36
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Does anyone else think something does not smell right here?
I have one of the first XSI's that became available early this year, no problems.
Since this thread, I have been to several vendors and have tried to duplicate the noted problems, so far it has not happened.
By the way, Canon has a firmware update for the XSI available for those with firmware version 1.0.4. It does not address the above mention issue, if it is an actual issue.
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Old Oct 25, 2008, 9:25 AM   #37
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Look... I've still got a feeling it's something you're doing (or not doing) causing your issues, especially after multiple camera bodies from more than one store location.

I'd suggest that you look at page 61 of the manual, and make sure to select something other than Auto or Scene modes to test with (use P mode or Aperture Priority instead), making sure you are selecting the focus point being used by the camera. Changing to to Single Shot AF is not enough. You've got to tell it which focus point to use. Otherwise, the camera may decide to focus on something other than your intended subject (and from what I can see of the sharpness of what you left of the first figurine in that last sample, that's the one it probably focused on (and it's probably designed to focus on something closer most of the time, depending on the mode selected, if you don't tell it otherwise).

Here's what you'll see in the manual:

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Old Oct 25, 2008, 9:41 AM   #38
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Hi Jim,

I agree with you, the closest figurine is less blurry. I don't know, why metadata shows the AF point has not been selected. I know it was. First I selectedsingle AF central point, than pointed red blinking LCD to thecentre of the imagein my viewfinder.Next I proceded as usually (half way press, waith till it becomes sharp and pressed all the way).

However I think the problem might be macro mode. Maybe camera was situated to far from the object for macro and this is why the closest one was better. I'll check it.
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Old Oct 25, 2008, 9:56 AM   #39
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Quote:
I don't know, why metadata shows the AF point has not been selected.
That's probably because one was *not* selected. You probably just *thought* you were selecting one.

I'd suggest reading the manual about how AF works (especially that last page I just posted). You can't select a focus point in Auto or Scene modes. ;-) One camera may not work the same way as another.

The Focus mode for that shot was Auto with no focus points selected according to more than one EXIF reader I've checked it with (letting the camera decide what to focus on, and it's probably going to select the focus point that's over the closest subject in the frame when you do it that way). So, whatever outside focus point covered something closest to the camera is probably what was being used in that case with Macro mode (that's probably the sharpest part of the frame, even if that point was not centered on a figurine and only caught something on it's side).

Here's another excerpt from the article I suggested earlier in this thread. Again, this article by Petteri Sulonen makes a real good read for a new dSLR owner:

Don't Be A Bozo

"The right-hand path is harder. It requires you to draw a deep breath, sit down, relax, and read the manual through. Then read the parts again that concern what you're trying to do. Then read those parts more time, this time trying out each of the things described in it. Then go out and shoot pictures with the camera, in the way described in the manual. And after this, if the pictures *still* come out orange, soft, dull, flat, blown, or blurred, there's just a possibility that you misunderstood something. There's always a reason a picture turned out the way it did, even if the reason is a defective camera. It's up to you to figure out the reason, and find a solution."

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Old Oct 25, 2008, 10:23 AM   #40
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Look, it's possible you've got a camera problem. But, you're not testing it in a way that tells you what the issue is.

To tell if it's got any problems, you'll need to select a focus point, as described on page 61 of the manual, using a mode that allows you to select a focus point. Otherwise, the camera is going to "guess" what to focus on, which may not be your intended subject (as described on the page I posted above).


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