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Old Dec 31, 2008, 4:00 PM   #1
PB3
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Hi!

I am new to the SLR world and still trying to figure out how to work my XSI.

I was wondering what would be the best technique to capture a "panning shot", fast moving background and frozen subject.

I have the standard lens kit 18/55mm and a 55/250mm zoom lens. Would a specific setting like the "TV" mode help me to get the shot? I know shutter speed is probably a key in getting it just right too but not sure on how fast or slow would work best.

Thanks in advance for all the great help!
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Old Dec 31, 2008, 5:09 PM   #2
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hi and welcome!
you are correct, the shutter speed is very important! i'm not familiar with the xsi but use your shutter mode. depending on your lighting ie. sunny, or indoors. slow it down to about 200 shutter and see how that works, then you can slow it down from there if you want more blurr. very important is the follow through, don't stop after you press the shutter keep following the subject, another important point is make sure you are focused on the area of the subject you want focused, i know its easier said than done, i shot some dragbikes and none were slower than 9 seconds, but it was fun!! sometimes i practice shooting the cars on the street in front of my house.

here is an example


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Old Dec 31, 2008, 5:38 PM   #3
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WOW! Thats a great looking picture!

I am not too sure what mode would be "shutter mode" on my camera but the manual setting and "TV" setting let me adjust my shutter speed.

I think the "TV" is for adjusting mainly the shutter speed. Maybe someone familiar with the XSI will help out.

In all the advise of follow through and practicing on moveing cars is something I will for sure attended to!
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Old Dec 31, 2008, 10:46 PM   #4
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You are right, you can use either Tv where you set the shutter speed and the camera works out the aperture for you, with M then you control everything. If we are talking about shooting cars then if possible M is the way to go as in Tv the camera can be fooled by either bright or dark cars. If the car is light in colour then the camera will think things are bright so make your shots too dark and with a dark subject it will likely over expose the image. However shooting in manual is not as easy to get right so for safety going Tv is probably the starting place.

On to shutter speeds. These will vary by speed of subject, lens length, distance from subject but forsomething fast moving then I would agree with trying 1/200s.

Here is a shot off of a start line so I was down at 1/60s



Going further back in my archives (I've not shot much motorsprot recently) this is a higher speed moment but only at 1/40s which gives the interesting distortion. The way I was able to get the front of the car sharp is by keeping this this portion in the same place of the lens as panning as well as pre focusing the lens to a spot on the track and taking the photo at this point. If you have a fast focusing lens/camera combo and good light then you can just track but with this shot the light under the trees was pretty poor.



Last one. I just love the colour of this TVR so have to include it. This was at 1/160s as here he is approaching 100mph. Yes there is a little PP work on this but only to take the colour out of the background, all the motion blur is from the camera.


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Old Jan 1, 2009, 7:07 AM   #5
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It works well on not so fast subjects as well.
In this shot I wanted to convey how fast Erika was riding a bike....Indoors. She wasn't moving very fast, but with a slow shutter speed of 1/25 and good follow through, it worked as I wanted. Notice just about everything except her face is blurred.
Tv mode or M (manual) will work best. Experiment and have fun with it.
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Old Jan 1, 2009, 9:30 AM   #6
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Great stuff!

Thank you so much for helping out. All that is left is for me to go out and put this advise into action.

Thanks again!
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Old Jan 4, 2009, 3:53 PM   #7
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Something that was not mentioned in the other posts is if using AF use AI Servo AF mode. Focus on your subject and give the AF a bit of time to settle before shooting. Use a smooth panning motion and press the shutter button smoothly as well dont mash it.

I like to use a single AF ponit not all focus points as I like to pick what I am focusing on. With all focus points the camera can get fooled in to focusing on something else with better contrast. AF will work a bit faster with a single point as well.

If shootig cars,bikes etcit is good to use a slow enough shutter speed to get some blur in the wheels or otherwise the subject will look static you also get more blur in the background with your panning motion


straight pan



1/80s f16 iso50 at 150mm



3/4 pan



1/40s f18 iso100 at 400mm



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Old Jan 4, 2009, 10:20 PM   #8
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Good advice TG. I personally prefer manual focus for shooting action.
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Old Jan 4, 2009, 10:21 PM   #9
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That first pidture is incredible! Its amazing how you got the car to pop like that!

I have yet to practice my panning but I will surely adjust my AF mode to the Servo.

Just thought I throw this in there but when shooting moving objects that are at high speeds or children running, would the IS "Image stabilizer" benefit at all? I eventually want to get a little stronger zoom lens but not too sure if getting one with IS will help with these shoots?

I mean besides the other areas that are not the focal point it looks like you didnt move a hair when you and others that have posted pictures take their shoots.

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Old Jan 4, 2009, 11:46 PM   #10
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No benift with IS for moving subjects except forCanon lenses withmode 2 IS designed for panning.

Only have oneIS lens (no mode 2),purcached a 70-200 f2.8 L (non IS),a secondhand 300 f4 L (non IS) and with the money I saved used it to put towards other lenses. I did not have a real benfit for IS with the type of shooting I do.
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