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Old Jan 5, 2009, 7:34 PM   #1
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I want to get some good shots with a canon xs of the moon. What type and name of lens should I get I want to do this without using a telescope.
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Old Jan 5, 2009, 8:01 PM   #2
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Try this.
There should be some good info and a few examples here.


http://forums.steves-digicams.com/forums/view_topic.php?id=70540&forum_id=2&highlig ht=http://forums.steves-digicams.com/forums/view_topic.php?id=70540&forum_id=2&highlig ht=moon+shotsmoon+shots
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Old Jan 5, 2009, 8:08 PM   #3
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Here is a moon picture I took with a very inexpensive Sigma 70-300 mm lens on a Canon 30D.


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Old Jan 5, 2009, 8:21 PM   #4
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Interesting you should ask as only a matter of minutes prior I finished creating this thread http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...mp;forum_id=90

Hope it gives a guide.
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Old Jan 12, 2009, 2:04 AM   #5
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Yesterday they announced that last night and tonight would be the best shots of the moon. So I tried your suggesed settings and the exposure was fine except the moom did not come out in good focus. I basically shot the Rebel XSi with the 75-300mm telephoto at 1/1000, f/5.6, ISO100/200. I tried both auto focus and Manual focus, and while the image looked good in the view finder, it was not even close to the quality of the pictures above.

I am amazed of how many different posts I have seen on this web site that are complaining about the bad focus or non-sharp images that people get with the KIT lens. I've complained on several different threads, only to be told I should learn how to use a DSLR if I want good pictures. I guess Canon put all those P&S settings on the Camera as a joke.

The camera and both lens have been in to the Irvine lab for check and Canon says there fine. I sent many picture to the Camera Tech's in NY and now they want me to send all the stuff back again. I'm reluctant to do this until I've done more testing and convinced there is a problem. Sometimes I get good focus, sometimes I don't. All I know is that this XSI shoots worse pictures in any mode than my G7.
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Old Jan 12, 2009, 7:52 AM   #6
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Where do you live trigger1937?

If you live where it is COLD, as it has been here in North America the past few days, are you letting your camera and lens acclimatzebefore you take your photos. "Dew" develops quickly on lens surfaces and can produce the "focus" results you are getting.

Over the years taking many astrophotos with telescopes as well as with standard telephoto lenses and TCs, I have been amazed at how many people simply grab their camera, run out from their warm and moist home or car into the cold, and never once notice their optics hazing up.

Also, after I have taken a bunch of photos in extreme cold, I usually place my camera and lens into a plastic bag before bringing it into my warm and moist home, and let the camera warm up before I unseal it from the bag to prevent moisture from forming on the internal mechanisms.

Just something to consider.
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Old Jan 12, 2009, 8:07 AM   #7
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Trigger1937, I received my first canon dslr 4 years ago with the 17-85 IS lens but as I shot mainly swimming sports, I rented "L" series 2.8 zoom lenses for the first year to see which lens I would be happy with.

If you were to find my early posts on this site, you would read therein of my complaining about the 'lack of focus' or 'soft focus' images I kept taking resulting in hundreds of digital images I'd have to throw away from a weekend of shooting some athletic meet and let me tell you I was extremely feed-up of the fact that this equipment is NOT cheep and shouldn't one expect at least to see sharp images if the package your shooting with can cost $$thousands$$??!!

I'm going to tell you that after MUCH digital 'bashing' it took someone else to tell me to stop shooting at the widest aperature (which I was doing for shutter speed). Once I stopped down the lens from f2.8 to f3.5 - f4, my images were now sharp and instead of throwing away 300 images from a weekend meet, I was tossing 30 to 60 away.

I see from your settings you posted, you shot your moon at 1/1000 (TO FAST) at ISO 100/200 (perfect) at f5.6 (TO WIDE).

Firstly, you don't need 1/1000 shutter speed to capture a krisp, sharp moon. You can capture a sharp moon at up to a 5 second shutter so set your shutter timing to around 3 seconds by adjusting your aperature to around 10 or 12, your ISO's to 100, DOUBLE focus by getting two or three focus hits before you actually take the picture and you should be impressed with the results. (I have the focus mode on my Canon 20d to "One Shot" instead of the AI modes as I don't want my camera to give me a 'best focus guess' shot.)

For moon shots, I also use a tripod and a remote shutter release cable for the best results.

So, to sum up what I said, if you want sharp images from your kit lens or "L" series glass, DON'T shoot at the aperture extremes such as your lens can do, either at the widest or the narrowest settings, come in a few stops from these limits and you will find your images sharper.

Cheers!
Kevin
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Old Jan 12, 2009, 10:49 AM   #8
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Spy,... Thanks for the information. I will try that tonight. The moon won't be so full but it won't have changed much. I've also heard that many of these "Less expensive Lenses won't properly focs at infinity. I noticed when I did a manual focus, the best view on the ground glass was when the ring was no where near the end of rotation.

It didn't matter, neither the manual or auto focus were any good. I also remember reading that any lens is at its worst at the wide open setting. I was doing mostly hand held shooting and forgot about stoping down. For my last few shots I went in and got my tripod and I'll do that again tonight.

I has been cold in Northern California where I live but last night at 11:00PM it was not that bad. Probably in the middle 40's. I was out there for 30 min without any coat and didn't notice the cold.

The same moon was setting this morning at 7:30 in my back yard but of course there were clods on the horizon so it was not a good shot.

Question for anyone. Since we are limited in the KB we can upload as a picture, how does anyone ever upload a RAW image,... or is that never necessary.

I wonder if Hager would tell us what settings he used for his shot with his 30D

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Old Jan 12, 2009, 12:36 PM   #9
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spy schreef:
Quote:
Firstly, you don't need 1/1000 shutter speed to capture a krisp, sharp moon. You can capture a sharp moon at up to a 5 second shutter so set your shutter timing to around 3 seconds by adjusting your aperature to around 10 or 12, your ISO's to 100, DOUBLE focus by getting two or three focus hits before you actually take the picture and you should be impressed with the results. (I have the focus mode on my Canon 20d to "One Shot" instead of the AI modes as I don't want my camera to give me a 'best focus guess' shot.)

For moon shots, I also use a tripod and a remote shutter release cable for the best results.

So, to sum up what I said, if you want sharp images from your kit lens or "L" series glass, DON'T shoot at the aperture extremes such as your lens can do, either at the widest or the narrowest settings, come in a few stops from these limits and you will find your images sharper.

Cheers!
Kevin
http://www.poetryofmotion.com
Shot a year ago this pic:



Gear used: Canon 30D, Sigma 50-500 with a 2x extender.

When i took this picture i needed a shutterspeed of around 1/200 to get a sharp picture, the moon was traveling so fast, the first time i looked trough mij camera i thought my tripod was slipping. So a shutter of 5 seconds sounds to me a bit off.

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Old Jan 12, 2009, 12:51 PM   #10
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Trigger, I have made many moon shots using the canon 70-300mm lens with good results. The main things to keep in mind are to use a tripod and release. I use and f-stop of f8-11 and adjust shutter speed until the shot comes out look well exposed on the view screen. ISO 100 or 200. And when using a tripod make sure, if you have it, IS is turned OFF!!!!

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