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Old Apr 2, 2009, 12:51 AM   #1
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Oops.... That should have said "WANT" to say hello, not "what" what a way to start things off....*LOL*
Hello Canon users!!

Just ordered my 1st D-SLR today. I purchased the 50d with the 28-135 IS lens and also ordered the Tokina 11-16 wide angle lens. I need a little help in the memory card section. I was told I should get at least a 8gb MC. I've noticed a LARGE price difference between a few. Why so much? Speed? What carddo you recommend I get for the 50d.

Thanks........
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Old Apr 2, 2009, 1:28 AM   #2
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Personal advice is to go for 2 4GIG than 1 8gb. Atleast i will have a back up if one of the card fails.

And unless u are going to shoot sports and need that writing speed a simple sandisk ultra II 4 GIG or 8GIG card would suffice.

Personally i use lot of 2GIGs mainly to have the flexibility in case of a card failure

Vivek
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Old Apr 2, 2009, 7:24 AM   #3
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Thanks for the reply and suggestion. VERY good idea. I'll check into the sandisk ultra II 4 GIG MC.

Thanks again for your help.....
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Old Apr 2, 2009, 7:53 AM   #4
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You may find Rob Galbraith's tests to be helpful in determining cards that perform better in the 50D:

http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/cam...?cid=6007-9672

The 50D is one of the few Canon models supporting UDMA. So, it can write to UDMA compatible CompactFlash cards *very* fast compared to previous models like the 40D.

What you want to shoot, and the mode you want to shoot in can impact what card may serve you best.

If you stick to jpeg, chances are, you'll never need to worry about the speed of a card, since the camera's buffer is relatively large.

But, if you want to shoot raw in continuous mode, the buffer will fill up after around 16 photos, and the frame rate will slow down considerably (to around 1 frame every two seconds a with 133x card), with the buffer taking around 45 seconds to fully clear.

With a fast 45MB/Second (300x) UDMA card, you'll have a *much* faster buffer full rate (approx. 2 frames per second after 16 raw images), with the camera's buffer taking less than 8 seconds to clear.

Most users don't shoot raw for sports. But, given the faster throughput to media with newer camera models like the 50D with support for UDMA, you'd be able to get away with shooting in raw for more flexibility later if desired, even if shooting sports in continuous mode with longer bursts.

Personally, I keep a 16GB card in my camera (Sony A700) at all times, and I've used more than 13GB on more than one occasion shooting raw+jpeg.

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Old Apr 2, 2009, 8:24 AM   #5
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JimC wrote:
Quote:
But, if you want to shoot raw in continuous mode, the buffer will fill up after around 16 photos, and the frame rate will slow down considerably (to around 1 frame every two seconds a with 133x card), with the buffer taking around 45 seconds to fully clear.
Jim made some great points about the technology but I wanted to focus in on this statement. Unless you're shooting fashion model photography, if you're routinely taking 16 shot bursts in RAW I would strongly encourage you to re-evaluate what you're doing. I'm a sports shooter and routinely take bursts of photos and MAYBE, just MAYBE I've taken a 16 shot burst oncein the last 5 years.

This is not to say you don't want the fastest cards out there - especially with prices so low - just that since you're new to DSLRs I thought I'd throw this tip out there - if you want quality photos, taking 20 shot bursts isn't the way to get them for 99% of shooting needs.

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Old Apr 2, 2009, 9:06 AM   #6
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You wouldn't need to take a single long burst to run into frame rate problems shooting raw in continuous mode.

If you're using a slower card, a handful of shorter bursts taken close together can also fill the buffer when shooting raw.

With a 50D, each raw image is going to take around 4.5 seconds to clear the buffer with a 133x card (and the 50D buffer will hold 16 raw images). So, a handful of shorter bursts relatively close together can also fill the bufffer, resulting in much slower frame rates (around 1 frame every 2 seconds when the buffer is full with this model if using a 133x card).

I've ran into this issue with more than once with relatively fast dSLR models shooting raw + jpeg in continuous mode with a 133x card when using shorter bursts close together.

I don't shoot action enough to worry about upgrading my cards yet. I tend to keep a 133x Transcend 16GB card in my camera (under $50 now at some vendors like newegg.com), and the fastest card I currently have is a smaller Transcend 2GB 266x Card.

But, if I were shooting sports a lot, and wanted the flexibility of having raw files to work with later, I'd be inclined to get a newer 300x UDMA compatible card if using a camera that supported UDMA (for example, a Transcend 16GB 300x UDMA SLC Card), so that I wouldn't run into frame rate reductions if shooting a lot of bursts close together.

Of course, raw versus jpeg is another debate, and many users will be fine with jpeg for action type shooting. I tend to shoot raw + jpeg, so that I have the post processing flexibility associated with the raw files if I need it.

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Old Apr 2, 2009, 8:57 PM   #7
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I'm not much of a sports fan, unless its motor sports. I mainly like to take pictures of my daughter, cars and scenery. Sooo I guess the fastest moving object would be when my daughter is running around trying to get a way from me, you know how 2 year olds are.:lol:I guess a regular/standard memory card would work fine???
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Old Apr 3, 2009, 8:02 AM   #8
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Quote:
I'm not much of a sports fan, unless its motor sports
Actually, shooting race cars is one of the times I've run into issues with a camera's buffer filling up (trying to take bursts of cars while panning, with very little pause in between bursts in order to get photos of the next car(s) flying by. :-)

But, I probably took a lot more photos than I really needed that way. Chances are, most users wouldn't have an issue with a full buffer with a model like the 50D, unless they're doing a lot of that kind of thing, and then, only if shooting raw (and I tend to shoot raw + jpeg for more post processing flexibility if I need it). Then (shooting a lot of consecutive bursts using raw), a faster card may come in handy.

Given current card prices, I'd probably get a larger card for the "best bang for the buck" (Gigabytes of storage per dollar). That way, you don't have to worry about swapping cards if you are taking a lot of photos (or away for a weekend, etc.).

From my perspective, I think you're more likely to cause a problem swapping cards (bent/damaged pins, static electricity causing damage, lost cards) versus keeping a larger one in the camera without needing to swap cards during a given outing. But, I'd make sure to have a spare in case of a failure. You can pick up a 16GB card at a very reasonable price now (under $50 delivered). I've been using one of the Transcend 16GB 133x CompactFlash cards since October 2007 without problems (and these have a lifetime warranty).

At that time, faster SLC (Single Level Cell) memory based cards were not being made in 16GB size yet. There are much faster cards in 16GB size now. For example, the newer Sandisk 16GB Extreme III cards are 30MB/Second cards (see packaging to make sure you get a newer one, as older Extreme III cards aren't as fast), and Transcend and others now make even faster 300x (45MB/Second) UDMA cards in a 16GB size. Here are some of the larger cards at newegg.com (and you can get 32GB Cards now, too).

16GB CompactFlash cards at newegg.com

8GB CompactFlash Cards at newegg.com


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Old Apr 3, 2009, 9:36 AM   #9
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Thanks to EVERYONE who replied. JimC, thanks for the links you provided. Makes picking a card simple now.
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Old Apr 3, 2009, 10:36 PM   #10
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I've desided to with 2 of theSanDisk Extreme III 4GB Compact Flash cards this time around. Can somebody double check this to make sure Im getting the correct one for my 50d? Here is the one I will be purchasing:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16820171340

As soon as I here back fome somebody that this the correct card, I will place my order. Thanks again guys for the help.....
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