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Old Nov 12, 2003, 10:33 PM   #1
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Default Digital Rebel Compatibility with EOS Elan Lenses

I have a Canon EOS Elan (an oldie but a goodie), with (2) lenses

EF 28-80 Ultrasonic
EF 100-300 Ultrasonic

I believe the EF lenses will work on the Rebel, but I am trying to understand if they are better or worse than the new lenses below. Price is not really an object. I have young children and am trying to catch some really oustanding pictures/memories.

EF-S 18-55
EF 55-200

Anxiously waiting to part with my $999!
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Old Nov 13, 2003, 6:19 AM   #2
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The EF lenses will work but you'll have to multiply them by 1.6x, your lenses will become:
EF 28-80 Ultrasonic -> EF 45-128 Ultrasonic (ie you lose the wide angle)
EF 100-300 Ultrasonic -> EF 160-480 Ultrasonic (but gain in tele)

With the EF-S 18-55 (really a 29-88mm) you're regainning your wide angle; however since theses lenses are designed for the smaller sensor in the Digital Rebel, the EF-S is not compatible with your Elan if you decide to interchange the bodies (or move up to a full frame later), a regular but more expensive EF 17-40mm may be better for you
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Old Nov 13, 2003, 9:56 PM   #3
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Thanks for clearing up a few cobwebs NFL. So if I understand you correctly the lenses I have will work, but they will behave a little differently in the Rebel (a lot more zoom).

I am finding that I am being drawn more and more into digital, and starting to lose my desire to shoot film. So if I follow your logic on the Ultra-Wide, the EF 17-40mm would behave like a EF 28-64 on the Rebel, and would be able to be used on a full frame digital as they are rolled out. I believe I get your point.

If I stay with the EF-S 18-55mm (because it is relatively cheap at time of purchase), are their any other negatives about using my older EF 100-300mm? I do a lot of point and shoot just spinning the dial to portrait/landscape, etc. Will I lose any automatic functions (focus or otherwise) with the older lens, or will I just pick up a much stronger telephoto?

I was also considering the Sony DSC-F828, but the Canon seems very versatile. Any thoughts on the comparison of the two?

p.s. Your gallery is stunning.
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Old Nov 13, 2003, 11:52 PM   #4
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You'll definitely find you shoot mostly digital instead of film especially with a dSLR. It's too cheap (after buying the camera) not to, unless you have a specific need that digital can't get for you.

I'd hold off buying a 17-40 lens and get the 18-55 EF-S lens first. It's a good deal and the 17-40 isn't cheap. I wouldn't buy an expensive lens just so it's backwards compatible with a different body when the other option is so inexpensive. I'm in much the same situation with my film camera being an Elan 7, but I'd never get the benefit of such a wide (17 mm!) angle lens on it.

Buy more memory, an extra battery or a flash with the difference. If you have an Elan II then you're external flash may not work. The EZ series isn't compatible with dSLRs, you need an EX series flash. For indoor shots a good flash is imperative and will give you the most benefit for the buck.

You won't lose any capabilities with the older lenses in the PIC modes, don't worry about that.

About the only thing I'd caution with the 100-300mm lens is that you'll have to watch for lens shake at the high end of the zoom. You'll have an ~500mm lens and the rule of thumb says you'd need to keep the shutter speed above 1/500s. Even then I'd use a tripod, monopod or brace the camera somehow. I have a 75-300 and found most shots at the maximum zoom to be pretty awful if it was in the late afternoon.

A kit with a 18-55, 28-80 and 100-300 lenses will give you a lot of options. Keeping the film camera for a backup is a nice to have too.
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Old Nov 14, 2003, 12:31 AM   #5
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Thanks for the advice ursa. I am almost certain I will pay the extra $100 and get the EF 18-55mm. Is the EF-S lens the only lens that you do not multiply by 1.6? So if I would decide to buy the EF 55-200mm lens that would really equate to a 88mm - 320mm. Would you still tend to get some shake (without a tripod) in medium light with that lens as well?

Also with regards to the flash do you have any recommendations? I see two flash units that Canon sells...the Speedlite 220EX & 420EX that are in my price range. The 200EX (~$150 US) and 420EX (~$200 US). I like taking a lot of people shots indoors and I really dislike the red-eye I always got with my Nikon 990. Or should I consider a non-Canon flash?
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Old Nov 14, 2003, 6:11 AM   #6
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FYI regarding flash: http://www.stevesforums.com/phpBB2/v...ighlight=sigma

All lenses including the EF-S 55-200mm will have a 1.6x factor, but remember I'm not just talking about backward compatibility... The EF-S lenses will not fit on the 10D or 1Ds for example, but only the Digital Rebel so forward compatiblty is the issue if you decide to upgrade at a later date. While the EF-S 18-55mm is a good buy I would not recommend the EF-S 55-200mm, but a longer lens with a wider aperture such as f/2.8 to control the Depht Of Field is probably a better buy (beside your old EF 100-300 USM more than covered that range)!
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Old Nov 14, 2003, 10:47 AM   #7
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Smarkle,

I also had a Nikon 990 and got very tired of redeye.
I sold my Nikon 990 and got the Canon Digital Rebel about a month ago, and I've gotten NO red-eye, even with the built-in flash, which sits further away from the lens.
I love this camera, just yesterday I received my new 55-200mm USM II lens from B&H in NY and it works great.

My only problem now is getting a big enough case to carry either lens thats not attached to the camera. I got the 18-55mm lens that comes with the Rebel in the kit, and it is a very good lens also.

I am VERY happy with the Rebel, and if you are considering it, I think you will LOVE it. My next purchase will be a 420EX flash.

Good luck!

Allen
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Old Nov 14, 2003, 1:32 PM   #8
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I wouldn't get the 220EX, being able to bounce the flash off a ceiling is a must have feature IMHO.

The 420EX is what I have and I'm happy with it but the upside on the Sigma is you can manually adjust flash compensation on the flash - the rebel does not offer this feature natively.

I agree NHL and would hold off with buying the 55-200 lens, your 100-300 and 28-80 will cover that range nicely.

Get a flash first then if you want to add a lens think about getting something with a larger maximum aperature in the focal lengths you use the most.

A 50 f1.8 is a cheap but optically good lens and would be good for portraits. I find the sigma 28-105 f2.8-4 to be a great every day lens and you'd get a stop or two more aperature than you have now. Both are less than the 55-200 and would be compatible with the film SLR you have. I personally wouldn't want to invest too much in EF-S lenses, forward compatability is an issue.

Use your 100-300 as your long lens and support it with a monopod when needed. If you're caught and just have to take a shot without a ridgid support boost up the ISO to 1600 and brace yourself up against a wall or something. That's the nice thing about digital - you can change 'film' speeds as needed.

re: camera shake - the less the zoom the less the shake. The rule of thumb is 1/effective length of lens or 1/60 of a second which ever is shorter. The only way to beat it is to use a flash to add more light to a scene or use a wide aperature to get more light in. Just remember that you need to multiply by 1.7 to get the effective length.
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Old Nov 14, 2003, 11:43 PM   #9
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Thanks again for the posts. I think I am now solid. I am going to take my EF 28-80 to a camera shop that has the Rebel and see how it looks. If I like it I will hold off on the EF-S 18-55mm.

I do still have a question on the bounce flash. I own an old flash for the Elan (it is even older than the II ... just a good EOS Elan). However, it does not have a bouce/tilt feature. Before I buy flash capable of bounce can you help me thru this?

My question is simple...if I tilt the lens up (to bounce off the ceiling) won't the flash get to the object I am taking a picture of too late? It seems like my camera will already have taken the picture by the time the flash hits the object. When I tilt the flash up...will it tell the flash to do it's thing a bit earlier because it has more distance to the object?

Also, on the rebel focus...I took one picture with my friends Canon (10D?). It seemed to have five or six focus blocks in the viewfinder. Each time you tapped the button it focused on a different block. So if I move the camera (say to focus on a moving object) and continue to refocus, will I also be changing the focus block? Or is the Rebel smart enough to know I am trying to focus on a moving object? I just don't want it to focus on the wrong thing.

Please keep in mind my Elan is several years old, so holding down the button on my Elan just keeps refocusing the lens on one thing. There are no fancy 'fields of focus' on my old cameral.
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Old Nov 15, 2003, 5:48 AM   #10
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Quote:
If I like it I will hold off on the EF-S 18-55mm.
you can not buy this lens separately... for what it costs, get it anyway since you'll need the wide angle (and it's so compact with the 300D!). Unless you've already planned on getting a full-frame 17-40 lens.


Quote:
My question is simple...if I tilt the lens up (to bounce off the ceiling) won't the flash get to the object I am taking a picture of too late? It seems like my camera will already have taken the picture by the time the flash hits the object. When I tilt the flash up...will it tell the flash to do it's thing a bit earlier because it has more distance to the object?
We're talking about speed of light here... What's faster? :lol: :lol: :lol:

In fact if you have used the wireless mode (which all theses cameras are capable of): the camera even have time to emit small flash bursts (or IR from the ST-E2 remote) to control the off-camera flash units (ie not just one flash) with their heads bend in any angle for reflection control. All the flash units still fire and modulated by the camera TTL-ly in duration so you can get a perfect picture within the mechanical sync tolerance of the shutter!

You'll need more power though since some of the light will be lost or diffused in the bounce process: http://www.stevesforums.com/phpBB2/v...612&highlight=

Quote:
Also, on the rebel focus...I took one picture with my friends Canon (10D?). It seemed to have five or six focus blocks in the viewfinder. Each time you tapped the button it focused on a different block. So if I move the camera (say to focus on a moving object) and continue to refocus, will I also be changing the focus block? Or is the Rebel smart enough to know I am trying to focus on a moving object? I just don't want it to focus on the wrong thing.
It's actually 7 AF points and you can do the same on the Digital Rebel... You can not just register your favorite one as on the 10D, but you can still manually choose each individual one on the Digital Rebel. 8)
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