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Old Nov 4, 2009, 1:09 PM   #1
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Default Saturation settings for Canon EOS series

Question for you Canon shooters....

I have both a 5D Mark ii and an XSi

I am finding that I like the colors of my work better when I increase the saturation.
Is this a normal thing to do for these two cameras?

If you normally shoot with increased saturation, how much and please be camera specific.

Thanks,

FP
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Old Nov 4, 2009, 1:57 PM   #2
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Well it is true that most dslr's keep their saturation settings pretty low, in order to give you more latitude to bump it up in post-processing. I would imagine your XSi has its saturation settings up higher than your 5d.

that said, i usually do any saturation boost in photoshop depending on the picture. so i don't ever really mess with the saturation in-camera.
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Old Nov 4, 2009, 3:20 PM   #3
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Thank you Mr. Moderator!

With what camera brand do you normally shoot? Just curious.

FP
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Old Nov 4, 2009, 4:00 PM   #4
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I have shot canon eos since the the 630 film camera (which i still have, that thing is a tank). right now i have a 50d that replaced my 20d (worn shutter).

my compact is a Panny LX1. its getting old, but i love the lens and controls.
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Old Nov 5, 2009, 10:23 AM   #5
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i dont like the JPEGS usually from the camera. When i am shooting landscape or a really vibrant environment i tend to shoot raw. Wildlife and other portraits, i just stick to JPEG> The best thing about your cameras is that images from both the camera can be manipulated exactly the same way your camera does in DPP.

DPP Raw processing is much subtle than JPEG processing

The DPP will reflect your in camera setting when you load the image. My advice is to adjust the saturation settings in DPP to check if it suits your interest. Also you can adjust based on what you see in the monitor than the LCD which is highly not reliable, atleast to me.
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Old Nov 5, 2009, 10:39 AM   #6
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i agree 100%. i shoot landscapes and such raw, though i process in lightroom instead of dpp.

wildlife, travel, etc, i shoot jpg.
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Old Nov 5, 2009, 10:49 AM   #7
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These last two responses are interesting because the advice I've gotten up until now, is do as much as you can at the camera level in order to decrease the amount of work you need to do in post production.

Am I missing something?
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Old Nov 5, 2009, 10:57 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FaithfulPastor View Post
These last two responses are interesting because the advice I've gotten up until now, is do as much as you can at the camera level in order to decrease the amount of work you need to do in post production.

Am I missing something?
well, usually when people say, get as much right in camera as possible, they are talking about really getting the exposure correct, or using graduated filters to reduce exposure differences between sky landscape, using a circ polarizer to get the best saturation out of the image.

but it is always better to manage your sharpness, contrast, and saturation in your post-processing. this gives you full control, and allows you to tailor it to the individual picture.

this is regardless if you prefer to shoot jpeg or raw. raw just gives you even more latitude to adjust white balance, gives you more control over exposure tweaks, but of course, at the expense of large file sizes and increased processing burden.

the only reason to boost the sharp/cont/sat in camera is convenience.
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Old Nov 8, 2009, 7:37 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hards80 View Post
I have shot canon eos since the the 630 film camera (which i still have, that thing is a tank). right now i have a 50d that replaced my 20d (worn shutter).

my compact is a Panny LX1. its getting old, but i love the lens and controls.
Great advice. My first Canon too was a (used) 630 (probably bought in the mid ninety's), which I still use about once a year just to keep it in good working condition.
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