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Old Nov 25, 2003, 10:34 PM   #1
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Default New to EOS Digital Rebel too :-)

Hello Everyone, as many of you, I caught the Digital Rebel fever too. My main interest are natures, birds and some astro-photograhy.

Proud owner of this new jewel and before buying it, I knew I had to buy lens. My plan in the near future, when I'll have the money for is an EF 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM Lens for everyday usage and the next step will be the EF 70-200mm f/4L USM lens.

For astro-photograhy, it will be a long shot, since I have a Celestron 8" SCT, but I'll need a computerized mount instead of that manual mount, will start-off in piggy-mount, which is just the camera mounted on the telescope.

I created 2 small photo-album, nothing extra-ordinary, but I have few nice shots I wish to share. Those 2 albums are for my new EOS Digital Rebel and my now sold Coolpix 995, interestingly , back last year I took images of the moon with it.

Here's the URL of the photo album :

http://community.webshots.com/user/drhangar


Ciao everyone !
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Old Nov 25, 2003, 10:48 PM   #2
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Dscn_moon

That's awesome ! Can't u shoot one like it with your new DRebel so we can see the difference ?

If the one of the moon is "piggy-mounted" seems perfect for me

Congratulations
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Old Nov 25, 2003, 11:18 PM   #3
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Hello Majestic-Twelve, for the moon taken with my now-sold Coolpix 995, what I did is I used a special mounting adapter, where you attach the lens of the camera (it was quite small) to the ocular of the telescope, then you need to aligned both the camera and the ocular, zoom the appropriate amount with the coolpix, to remove any side-effect (like tunnel vision if you like) then align the telecope to the moon. And take shots. If I remember correctly, I used a neutral filter on the ocular, cause the image produced was too glaring. On the camera side, I used quite a fast-shutter speed to take the picture.

For the Digital Rebel, this will be a different story. I'll need to buy a T-adapter ring for Canon EF lens hooked directly to the telescope. rear mount. That is no oculars between the camera and the telescope.

Another method is with a T-Adapter and a tele-extender and through an eyepiece (its a kit) where you attach the camera body to the T-adapter then through the kit. This technique is known as eyepiece projection photography. That method could be superb for moon or planetary shots, or even use the telescope in daylight to use it as a huge zoom. Although the image you’ll see through your camera’s viewfinder will be upside-down.

Piggy-mount is much simpler, but doesnt work much on moon or planetary shots, since the camera with its lens is simply mounted on top of the telescope, and the telescope electronic mount will "follow" the sky. It makes some very nice photos of large field of view (FOV) of the sky.

Ciao
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Old Nov 26, 2003, 2:55 PM   #4
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Eric,

Great shots with the DRebel and your "old" Nikon. I love the squirrel in the new shots. That's one of the things I miss about living out here in Hawaii ... the absence of the whole "change of seasons".

I LOVE your moon shot from the old camera. That's the sort of thing I want to get into as well - I'm just trying to figure out how much money this is all going to cost me We have a really low-end telescope that has been sitting around the house for a while. I think if I want to do anything like you've done I'm going to need to get a good beginner telescope, the T-mount, and all that required stuff. Oh well - sometime next year.

Very nice pictures though!
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Old Nov 26, 2003, 3:36 PM   #5
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Hello Latka, thanks for the good words

As for your beginner telescopes, what I fear is the scope will produce purple-ish colors when trying to shoot the moon, due to chromatic aberation, and this is even worse due to the high level of brightness produced by the moon reflection.

One cheap solution is those Newtonian telescopes, they only have mirrors so no chromatic aberation, although the quality of the ocular will be what brings out as a neat crips / clear shot. Don't be shy to spend a little on oculars, with a good multi-coating, this will prevent internal reflection.

I have a SCT, which is a Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope, doesn't produce chromatic aberation, but its much more expensive than a Newtonian type.

The best possible telescope is a refractor type with ED glass (interestingly, Canon uses UD terminology, others will use LD)
The ED is Extra-Low Dispersion lens to counter-act the chromatic aberation created by refractor lenses, same thing happens with camera lens. The even better ones are those with Fluorite lens, but all these are very expensive telescope.

My advise, get a Newtonian on a equatorial mount, or if money is even too tight for that go for what is called a Dobsonian, which is a Newtonian using a special base. They are quite inexpensive, only your budget will dictate what aperture size you can get.

Good luck and if you have more question about the techniques or equimpment needed, let me know 8)

Ciao !
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Old Nov 26, 2003, 11:32 PM   #6
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Ohh, I added few more photos, the sky was clear tonite and decided to play a little more with the equipment I have.

These photos are piggy-back mounted, that is the camera sitting on top of the telescope. After analysing what I need, I concluded that first thing will be a remote control, then I will have to buy DC motors for the scope mount, so it follows the sky on its own. Cause this attempt was made with manual adjustments of telescope mount, to counter-act the action of the earth turning.

I noticed that by increasing the F value, it reduces the noise generate by too high ISO value. But 30 sec is simply not long enough to collect all the light from the stars. Bulb will be the way, but remote control is only possible to prevent camera shakes.

It was fun anyway

These new photos are found on the photo album link below

Ciao all !
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