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Old Dec 10, 2003, 8:00 PM   #1
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Default Digital Rebel for Portraits

A quick couple of questions. My wife is just finishing her first photography class (Straight As!), and wants to take wedding and family pictures. She's currently using a cheapie Vivitar V3800.

Question 1: Do "real" photographers consider the Digital Rebel of high enough quality for wedding/studio portraits?

Question 2: I know megapixels don't necessarily mean a larger print size, but what is the maximum high-quality print we could expect? 11 X 14? 17 X 21?

Thanks for your assistance.
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Old Dec 15, 2003, 8:53 PM   #2
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The Digital Rebel is perfectly capable of taking great studio pictures or wedding reception or whatever photos. For the purists though you'd probably want to spend some more and get the 10D for the ability to select metering and focus modes independant of the exposure mode. The DR is more of an advanced point-n-shoot where the 10D is more for enthusiast/semi-pro users.

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Old Dec 15, 2003, 10:54 PM   #3
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I would second Steve's description of the two cameras.

Philip

Does your wife want to take wedding pictures professionally, or does she just want to take pictures at weddings?

The size of the print out is very picture dependent, but as a general rule you can probably do 11x14 without trouble. Do realize that you will often want to crop the picture for better framing/composition. This will lead to less data and therefor (probably) a smaller print before quality drops off.

Eric
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Old Dec 16, 2003, 3:43 PM   #4
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Default Wedding appearances

Not all that long ago, no 'real' photographer would shoot a wedding with digital. No 'real' photographer would shoot a wedding with 35mm. On more than one occassion I met guys who were making a living at the game who firmly believed they needed black bodies because a chrome camera was the sign of an amateur. None of these are as silly as they sound. If you are charging some poor couple a thousand dollars to shoot their wedding, you might consider the message you are sending showing up with a $999 camera and no film cost.

Most wedding albums consist of a few large photos and a bunch of smaller candids. If the question were wholly on quality of product, the candids could certainly be shot digitally and 6Meg is plenty for 4x6's! The few large images and the potential wall hanging 'jumbo' would be straining the images of the DR probably beyond reason.

If I were to offer wedding services in digital, I would expect to get serious lip from competitors with 120 rollfilm rigs whether I was using a 300D or 1Ds. Customers who comparison shop will hear things that would suggest you should be charging half the price of the competition since you are delivering a 'faulted' product. People tend to spend a lot on wedding photos as part of the romance of the day and might not be inclined to accept a downgrade that their own eyes would never see without the aid of those willing to point out your equipment 'problems'.

This returns us to the question above which says it as well as can be said: "Does your wife want to take wedding pictures professionally, or does she just want to take pictures at weddings? "
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Old Dec 19, 2003, 9:19 AM   #5
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Default Re: Digital Rebel for Portraits

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philip
A quick couple of questions. My wife is just finishing her first photography class (Straight As!), and wants to take wedding and family pictures. She's currently using a cheapie Vivitar V3800.

Question 1: Do "real" photographers consider the Digital Rebel of high enough quality for wedding/studio portraits?

Question 2: I know megapixels don't necessarily mean a larger print size, but what is the maximum high-quality print we could expect? 11 X 14? 17 X 21?

Thanks for your assistance.
Hi Philip,

300D is quite good to take protraits photos especially compare to normal DC. I have some samples here for your reference:
http://www.fotop.net/hktraveller/protrait_20031216
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Old Dec 26, 2003, 3:53 PM   #6
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Wow, thanks for all the replies.

To answer the question: Yes, she wants to take wedding pictures professionally. There is an older gentleman who takes pictures and is willing to "intern" my wife with him. He is old school, and though I don't know the specific cameras he uses, I know they're all film.

I have seen reviews about the 10D and wondered if it was perhaps a better choice. One of the main reasons she wants to do this is to give people quality photographs and not charge a small fortune for them. She has a great eye for composition, not real strong on the technical side.

I think we'll look at the 10D as a possible alternative. What would be a good recommendation for a 35mm film camera for high quality? Are we pretty safe looking at the higher-end Canon cameras? Again, thanks for the input.
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Old Dec 26, 2003, 10:37 PM   #7
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If the plan is to get a Canon dSLR down the road then stay in the Canon line.

If you're planning on using a 10D as the main camera then I'd get a Elan 7E as the backup/film camera. It has the second function wheel and is about the same size as the 10D.

Moving up from the Elan is the EOS 3 which is a big step up in cost and would be a pretty expensive 'spare' to have in the camera bag. It has a better AF/AE capability but for weddings I don't see this being a big deal - it's easy to hand meter a shot or use AE lock. The EOS 3 is sealed against moisture but to truly use it in the rain you'd need a sealed lens, that may be an issue.

She'll get better pictures with an Elan 7 and a good off camera flash with battery pack, better lenses then with an EOS 3 with a cheap lens and flash. The camera body is only a part of the image taking equation.

On the other hand if the film camera is going to be used as the primary camera then an EOS 3 may be more appropriate. But I've seen some great pictures taken with some mid market cameras. It's the eye of the photographer that takes a great shot, the camera only records it.

Most wedding photographers I've seen use a medium format camera for the 'posed' shots and a 35mm for more candid work. If the chap she'd be interning for is 'old school' you may be shopping for a 2 1/4 inch camera before a canon film camera.

I'd be of the opinion that a 10D and Elan 7 as a backup would be a good combo. Add in a medium format camera with waist level finder for that 'professional wedding photographer' look and you're away to the races.
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