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Old Dec 5, 2010, 11:43 PM   #1
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ok so i am REALLY struggling on a replacement for my canon s5-is point and shoot. part of me wants to stay with the point and shoot and get the sx30-is, while the other part of me thinks a DSLR should be the way to go. i have never had one, but i hear good things about the t2i. whats the comparison in the 2 lenses? i really know nothing about the lens types etc. that come with a dslr....the lens it comes with, is it just a all around middle lens or something? does it have a good zoom? (comparable to the 35x zoom on the sx30-is) i like the feel of the dslr....a few friends have them i like the bigness....and they have a ton of functions....(most i have no idea what they are).............

or since im a noob to the dslr should i just stay with a point and shoot?
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Old Dec 6, 2010, 3:13 AM   #2
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If you never buy one then you'll always be a noob. :-)

The SX30 has a zoom range equivalent of 24-840mm.

The standard kit lens of the T2i has a zoom range equivalent of 27-88mm. To add a telephoto lens that covers an equivalent telephoto you would need to spend $1,000+ just for a half-decent lens. This on top of the body + kit lens.

In other words the SX30 is incredibly good value if you fall into one of two camps:
1) Someone who loves long lenses, but doesn't have much money to spend on photography.
2) Someone who only very seldom has use for a long telephoto lens, but would nevertheless like to have it as an option and is willing to accept the limitations that go with a P&S camera.
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Old Dec 6, 2010, 4:46 AM   #3
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The T2i/550d is great camera as said it normally comes with a kit lens 18-55is. From this point you would have to add lenses or just a lens what do you take pictures of.
I ihave to the T2i/550d and I have added a EFS55-250 and a 50 1.8. This seems to cover me for what I take pictures of.
You hae said that you have friends with them I am sure they would let you take a few shots then you can compare with what you have now. Good luck
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Old Dec 7, 2010, 6:40 AM   #4
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I was motivated to purchase the T2i to gain low light capability. I'm sure you've noticed the graininess of photos taken indoors. This is a function of sensor size and their corresponding ability to gather light. The bigger sensor, like the T2i compared to a P&S, will perform far better in these conditions. Outdoors in good light the P&S do very well.

Having made the purchase I have found many other advantages in artistic capabilities.

If these advantages are not applicable, the SX30 may be the camera of choice - it's nothing to scoff at.
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Old Dec 23, 2010, 11:06 PM   #5
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(Another voice)
There's certainly nothing wrong with a good P&S, but the image quality of any P&S will ultimately pale compared to that of a DSLR. I stuck with a series of P&S cameras, most recently an S3-IS, for as long as I could because I feared that once I bought a DSLR, I would become obsessed with lenses, flashes, tripods, and anything else I could find. Of course, once I bought first an XS and now a T1i, I did want more gear, but it's worth it to me.

You're looking at your current lens options based on one dimension, the zoom factor. For real image quality, you need to understand two additional dimensions. As noted above, the larger size of the sensor on a DSLR, even with APS-C, allows a significantly improved image capture. Perhaps more importantly, compare the diameter of the lens of a DSLR with that of even a higher end P&S; when you recognize that the mechanism of photography is the gathering of light to recreate an image, you'll understand that a much larger lens will let in more of that light and produce a significantly improved finished image capture. Similarly, compare the image capturing capability of your S5-IS to that of your cell phone camera with its pea-sized lens.

With all of this and more in mind, consider what pictures you really expect to take and what you plan to do with them, then talk to your friends with the SLRs and even someone at your neighborhood camera shop to find out what will fit your needs. It's often worth a few extra bucks to get the right gear and advice from someone else who is actually a photographer instead of seeking bargains from the big box or online. You may also want to compare Canon v. Nikon and other brands starting right now, because once you start buying lenses and flashes it makes sense to stick with one brand.

I'm done now :-)
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Old Jan 13, 2011, 10:33 PM   #6
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So, what have you decided on ?
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Old Jan 13, 2011, 11:25 PM   #7
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well i got the T21..............and took it back after a week. it really has too much going on i swear!!! i took pic after pic..........i even signed up for the classes at the place i bought it from, maybe im lazy.......i dont know, but i was really flustered with it, i think i was trying to be a master photographer since i had this sweet camera, but i sucked hahaha......i need to look at some other options i think.........
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Old Jan 14, 2011, 5:06 AM   #8
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Thats a Real shame to hear
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Old Jan 14, 2011, 8:01 AM   #9
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There certainly is a learning curve with a dSLR, it's not a magic wand to get better shots and as you found you can actually end up with worse initially. However if you want to learn more creative photography it is the best way to go. On the other side, if you enjoy the sort of shooting you've been doing then stick with the S5 (as probably there is nothing wrong with it and a new P&S might disappoint).
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Old Jan 14, 2011, 4:29 PM   #10
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i remember when i got my first dslr and how dissapointed i was .i expected magic but i stuck with it and with a lot of research and a whole lot of practice i can take a decent picture now. it is really amazing what you can do with a good camera and really good glass.
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