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Old Jan 5, 2004, 12:45 PM   #1
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Default No, I am not a complete idiot (stupid question inside...)

Ok, I'll just ask it...

What prevents a person from taking a piece of dampening material and placing it where the mirror slaps the inside of the body, the purpose obviously to reduce noise...

?

Obviously, you would need to be careful, BUT I dont understand why it is so loud...

Now, in my own defense, I am assumin the "mirror slap" doesnt auctually come from the outside edge of the mirror slapping the top of the camrea cause that would be to simple.

Could anybody explain the problem a little better for me? (See my sig, my first SLR is in the mail )
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Old Jan 5, 2004, 1:56 PM   #2
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That is usually done, but the material isn't always as good (i.e. expensive) as it could be. But some of the more expensive professional cameras have rather elaborate systems for reducing mirror slap, including dampening materials used like you describe.

As to doing it yourself... I don't know. I wouldn't risk it, but it's possible it could be done. Then again, going over Niagra falls in a barrel is also possible....

Eric
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Old Jan 5, 2004, 2:49 PM   #3
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... I hate to remind everyone here, but it has been done before:

Canon did make an RT (Real-Time) SLR with no moving mirror, but a fixed semi-transparent piece of glass. You dont hear the mirror obviouly, but then you can still hear the shutter curtains...

BTW one can lock the mirror up in the 10D, but the noise is still there...
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Old Jan 5, 2004, 3:09 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eric s
As to doing it yourself... I don't know. I wouldn't risk it, but it's possible it could be done. Then again, going over Niagra falls in a barrel is also possible....

Eric
of course the guy from michigan didn't need no stinkin' barrel..
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Old Jan 5, 2004, 7:55 PM   #5
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well, it makes me feel a little better to know my logic isnt completly off then..


I'll take a look at the DR when it comes, maybe talk to some of the profs at my University in related feilds and see if they have any swell ideas.

Dont worry, i wont do ANYTHING that has any chance of damaging my new camera, I am poor, i cant afford another one .
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Old Jan 6, 2004, 11:45 AM   #6
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I seem to remember reading about the D1h (or was it the D1?) from Nikon and the tricks they played to get the high frame rates. I thought one of them was a fully electronic shutter (no moving parts? Or very few? and no traditional shutter?)

I think I read about that on www.robgalbraith.com, but I don't reacall.....

Eric
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Old Jan 6, 2004, 9:54 PM   #7
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I think ill just take some felt and stick it on the edge of the mirror, so it will be much quieter when it slaps up!!!


good idea!!?






















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Old Jan 7, 2004, 10:42 AM   #8
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Well, it's a bit risky because you'll increase the weight of the mirror. You might instead look to put it where the mirror hits.

Another issue is that the mirror will then not go as far (it will hit the felt instead of swinging all the way up) so it might get in the way of the picture.

Don't know, just thinking off the top of my head.

As I said, this is certainly something I wouldn't try.

Eric
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Old Jan 8, 2004, 8:55 AM   #9
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And another isue is;
-Possible light leakage from viewfinder due to lack of proper locking in flipped up state.
-Material wear out results in dust. Dust is enemy no1 with any digital slr camera.
-Mirror contains information projected in viewfinder is partly blocked.

Possible problems could be; if mirror is pulled up a contact switch is pressed and with material added to mirror it does not do so anymore.

Better sollutions are; sound isolation the outside body. But you still have to be carefull with any material that it you shouldn't become a fixed dust collection around the lens opening.

Or use a rubber like paste and aply it to frame edge were the mirror falls into if pulled up. This should only be done if you have already extensive experience wiith using sticky material in awkward microscopic situation. The sticky material should dry completly non sticky and be applied as a very flat ring.
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Old Jan 9, 2004, 1:37 PM   #10
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I would also be careful about doing anything to void the warranty...
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