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Old Jan 7, 2004, 10:26 AM   #1
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Default Canon digital Rebel

:?: I have my eye on Canon's Rebel and would like your consensus of opinions regarding this camera. I will probably buy with no lens. What lens would you start with? I'm thinking of Canon's EF 28-90mm f/4-5.6 USM to start and would like to supplement with a longer lens, such as, 28-135mm 3.5-5.6 IS USM. My photos will vary from close up to telephoto. I'm also thinking of a 512m HIGH SPEED CF card. I need help in selecting a good case, but not too expensive since I'm spending most of my budget for the lenses. Is there such a thing as a "extended time battery"? I've heard some of Sony's batteries can be used on this camera. Thank you in advance for your help.
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Old Jan 7, 2004, 11:07 AM   #2
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Hi dbirds

i had that 28-90 with an EOS 50e and it really wasnt that good. It was quite slow to focus and also produced very soft images. If you dont intend printing to big (certainly no bigger than A4 size) then it may be ok. I went with the kit lens and am really happy with it while i save up for the 17-40L. I have a 50mm 1.8 that is really sharp and very cheap that you could also consider. As for the 28-135 IS lens I cant comment on but i read a lot of very good reviews about it. As for the CF card.... doont worry about the high speed part as the DRebel doesnt take advantage of it. If you intend upgrading at a later date it could be worth it but personally i make do with standard cards from the likes of Crucial or similar suppliers. The bags and cases i use are Lowepro. I find they are really good quality and quite reasonably priced here in Europe. With regards to the batteries, I personally havent heard of any Sony compatibe batteries that work with the DRebel but know that there are many after market batteries that work brilliantly and cost less than half the price of the Canon ones. I got one at www.7dayshop.com for 14.99 and it works a treat.... Bets of luck with the DRebel (if you get it) and hope you enjoy it at much as i do....!
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Old Jan 7, 2004, 12:27 PM   #3
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Get the kit lens. Its a great lens, especially considering the 'price' you pay for it. $100 or so.

The 28-90 is about the worst lens Canon produces. Stay away from it.

The 28-135 IS is a good all around lens. You could also consider getting the 55-200 lens (only for the rebel) but I have no experience with it. You cannot go wrong with the 70-200 F4L.

Barthold
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Old Jan 7, 2004, 12:34 PM   #4
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I have the 50mm f1.8 and its a good lens and really cheap (for how sharp it is. It's a "plastic fantastic" as some like to say. Cheaply made, but optically quite good.)

The 28-135 is a nice walking around lens. Decent range coverage, fairly light and unabtrusive (compared to other lenses I have.) Its fstop isn't great... NHL likes the similar Sigma that doesn't have IS, but is a constant f2.8. I haven't used the lens, but there is something to his logic. I don't know if its cheaper, or about its optical quality. Don't need to research it, as I've got another.

I haven't used the 28-90, but from a quick look at a lens review site, I'd stay away. Its optical quality was rated at 0.75 out of 5. Sounds like it would make a better doorstop or paper weight than a lens.

I've got the 17-40L and like it. It's expensive, but quite nice. I don't use it enough to really say lots about it, but others here have it and like it... barthold comes to mind.

I like LowePro stuff as well. Not the cheapest, but they made really good stuff. I have two of their bags and like them a lot.

You might want to check here for good, fast CF cards. This site has done good reviews:
http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/mul...e.asp?cid=6007

As to the DRebel. I wouldn't buy it, but it doesn't fit my needs. Could you give us more details about what your subjects and shooting situations would be?

Eric
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Old Jan 7, 2004, 5:08 PM   #5
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As Eric says, the 50mm f1.8 is great. For about $70 you get a very sharp lens. It's small and light (and fragile).

I love the 17-40L. It just consistently produces great pictures for me! However, I didn't recommend it since the kit lens 18-55 is pretty good from wht people report. Having both is a waste. Thus instead of putting money in the 17-40L I would put it in say a 28-135 and a 70-200L F4. Plus, the 18-55 kit lens is a small lens, well matched to the digital rebel in size and weight and therefore nice to use as a walkaround lens.

Barthold
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Old Jan 7, 2004, 6:42 PM   #6
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Default Canon 55-200

The canon 55-200 has been repeatedly mis-labled as a Rebel only lens. This is false, the 55-200 is an EF lens compatible with any EOS camera body. The 18-55 is an EFS lens and is to be used on the DRebel only. It has a white square box as an alignment indicator instead of a red dot.
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Old Jan 8, 2004, 11:49 AM   #7
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:P I appreciate your suggestions. All were very helpful and there appears to be agreement on most. For the time being I'm going with the kit lens, but will look into the other lenses in the future.

I'm definitely getting the DRebel.

I had a salesman tell me that I needed a high speed CF (for more money of course) because I would have to wait 60 to 90 seconds before i could shoot the next picture. That sounded bizarre to me. Any comments on that bit of information?
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Old Jan 8, 2004, 1:37 PM   #8
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no no no no.

The sales man is wrong. Either you didn't explain all he said (doubtful) or he was just looking to make more money (more likely.)

Read that link I put in my previous post. It lists the performance of over 30 CF cards with the digital rebel (just go to the pull down menu in the upper right and select the rebel and you'll see the stats for that camera.) I don't know which CF card he suggested, but there are some good (not great & really expensive) CF cards that perform very well with the DRebel.

The DRebel (and the 10D) have an interesting design around the writing of pictures to CF. Instead of making it write very fast (which is expensive to design and make) they added a memory buffer (it holds 9 pictures in the 10D and 4 in the DRebel.)

The buffer holds the non-written shots until you stop shooting and then it writes them to the CF card. Once the write starts, you can't take another picture until it finishes writing that picture. If the camera is still idle, it then writes the next picture. Repeat until the buffer is empty. Here is the problem. Since the camera doesn't write very fast, there is a noticable delay where nothing can be done while a picture is written. If you fill the buffer, then the camera must write at least 1 picture to the CF card, locking the camera (no pictures!) while that picture is being written. When you're shooting, that time always seems like forever. But you are only locked out for the writing of 1 picture and then you can take another (and are locked out again because the buffer is now full again.)

But if you never fill up the buffer, then the camera performs great because the "lock-out while writing" never happens when you're actually shooting.

This is worse for you because the DRebel has a smaller buffer (4 pictures, I believe.) I know that there are times (not often, but not insignificant) where I get locked-out while shooting because I fill the buffer. This is one of the reasons why I wouldn't want a DRebel. If I get locked-out with a 9-pic buffer every now and then, I would certainly get locked-out a lot with the DRebel. But since you haven't said what you shoot or how you shoot we can't say if this would be a problem for you. If you shoot bursts of pictures, then you will have problems with the DRebel.

Obviously, the lock-out time will be shorter if the camera can write to the card faster. But the fastest cards are not much faster than the very fast cards in the DRebel because the camera just inherently doesn't write that fast. Look at that link to see what I mean.

Eric
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Old Jan 8, 2004, 1:41 PM   #9
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That is total bunk. I have two 256mb cards and have never waited for more than a few seconds and then only if i had shot multiple times. I shoot RAW most of the time. The buffer clears relatively quickly. Don't listen to that loser. I would go to another shop and not give that salesman the sale.
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Old Jan 10, 2004, 9:36 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atkison
Don't listen to that loser. I would go to another shop and not give that salesman the sale.
This is a really good point. There are a lot of people out there willing to tell you that you can't live without spending twice the money. I bought the DR and am working to adapt to some of its ways of doing things. Many people will tell you that it is no good and you need to buy the camera they have. When you find one of those in the local camera store where you pay extra for the priviledge of listening to their advice, don't give him the business. There are too many places selling photo gear to patronize 'losers' or places that play games like bait and switch or advertising one price and refusing to sell at that price.

The DR, like all SLR digitals, is not really a good place to begin the hobby of photography unless you realize that you have more to do with your bad photos than does the camera. It is not a point and shoot. If you approach the subject with the idea that the camera is what is causing you to be a bad photographer, you will be selling it in a few months and buying another camera that will probably serve you no better.
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