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Old Aug 4, 2011, 7:50 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by TCav View Post
While extension tubes are generally a good idea for an inexpensive way to get into macrophotography, what they do is magnify the flaws in the lenses you use them with. If all you've got is the 18-55 kit lens, you're results might not be very good.
Thanks for the input!
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Old Aug 4, 2011, 8:27 PM   #12
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Accessory lenses are meant to extend the range of P&S cameras because the lens isn't removable. As a result they may be too small to fit on a DSLR lens and so cause vignetting. The cheap ones are bad and the better ones aren't cheap as already pointed out.. Third party consumer grade lenses will give better results and won't cost much more.
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Old Aug 4, 2011, 10:30 PM   #13
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Thanks, Bob!
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Old Aug 7, 2011, 12:21 AM   #14
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I would be wary. The only reason to use converters is because you have some really brilliant old lenses (Leica or Zeiss or similar worth many thousands of dollars), or you are a connoiseur, or the lens you want to mount simply doesn't have a Canon equivalent.

The very last and worst reason is to try to save money. Generally you won't, you will just spend less and get nothing in return. False economy I'm afraid. The cheap converters are cheap for a good reason.

Macro tubes... well, since the advent of live view on cameras they are a much better proposition than they used to be, but they are still not much cheaper than the cheapest dedicated Macro lenses.

For a wide angle setup I would suggest using your kit lens and stiching instead, much can be done with free software. For a telephoto option you will be very much better off saving your $50 towards the cheapest EF telephoto lens you can find.

Look for the lenses that Canon sell in the kits on eBay, many people sell them off barely used; something like a Canon 55-250. Or Sigma and Tamron both do a cheap 70-300 zoom. Not the best quality, but new, and cheap, and likely to be a heck of a lot better than old MF lenses with a cheap adapter.

For example check out the Sigma 70-300 f4-5.6 Macro DG lens. Gives 2:1 macro, which is not bad and a telephoto addition.
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Old Aug 7, 2011, 12:41 AM   #15
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The raynox 250 is cheap, but gives you allot mag. But at the same time with the large dslr sensor it will also mag the imperfection of the lens. Also it is a very difficult lens to work with. A 4 diopters like a canon 250d close up lens, would be good with the 18-55.
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Old Aug 7, 2011, 1:00 AM   #16
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A telephoto is last on my list of desired lenses. I really don't use them much; but if I were to replace all my Minolta gear, a telephoto is on the list. The main reason why I got it was so that I could compress images (make buildings appear to be much closer together than they actually are). I was living in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at the time; and I worked in an area that had a lot of buildings in a small space. I used to go up to the top floor of the building and take photos out across the hill, of the rooftops. It was pretty cool. But, I don't live in the city anymore, so I really have no need for this lens, at this time.

More important to me are a wide angle (as wide as I can get, without being a fisheye) and a macro. I'm not a lens junkie. I only buy those lenses that serve a real purpose and for which I have a regular need.

But, I'm also not a millionaire. And spending $300-600 on a lens, is just not in the budget. However, I'm quite pleased to report that I finally got a job! Yay! It pays more than unemployment, so I will be a little more fluid. Saving up to buy a lens, seems to be a REAL possibility, now!

I need to go find my Minolta gear (it's out in the barn, in storage) and see exactly what I have that I was happy with; and therefore, exactly what I need to replace. Particularly the wide angle; I really liked that lens. The macro was good, but not exactly as strong as I wanted it to be. That one will be an upgrade, when replaced.

Unfortunately, much of what I use the wide-angle lens for (right now) is astro-photography. Stitching pictures is not an option, when doing this. However, stitching is a great idea and certainly something I will do for other landscape photography. I always forget about being able to do that! I'm fairly certain that my camera's software came with stitching... But, I don't exactly recall, so I need to look for it.

Thanks for the advice!
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Old Aug 7, 2011, 5:08 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JeannieBug View Post
I am hoping that perhaps conversion lenses might be a good alternative...

Does anyone have an opinion?

Thank you!
I have never seen a good photo taken through a wide angle adapter.

Screw on close-up lenses can produce good results if they are
used on a fast and sharp lens.

These were taken with the $100 Canon 50mm f/1.8 'Nifty Fifty'
and a cheap Foxpro branded close-up lens.



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Old Aug 7, 2011, 5:34 AM   #18
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Another one with 50mm f/1.8 and cheap close-up lens
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Old Aug 7, 2011, 9:56 AM   #19
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Thanks, corkpix for the info and examples!
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Old Aug 11, 2011, 9:39 AM   #20
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hey there jeanie
go for it
a minolta to ef canon adaptor should run ya under 100 bucks
if you have several minolta lenses then nuthin like giving it a twirl
then post some pix with your results
if you come from the old school manual focus should not be a problem for ya right
all you might have to do i gauge the correct light as the meter may not work well
good luck
pete
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