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Old Jan 19, 2004, 2:46 PM   #1
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Default What color space to use in Digi Rebel

What color space is best to use (other than RAW) if all I will be printing is 8.5 x 11s on a current inkjet, such as the latest HPs, Cannons, or Epsons. The Default is sRGB. Some one said this has a limited color gamut and I should use Adobe RGB. Any suggestions? Will I be able to see the difference on a quality inkjet, using the manufactures recommend glossy paper, on a 8.5 x 11 print? ( I use Adobe CS to fine tune my prints).[/list]
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Old Jan 19, 2004, 9:25 PM   #2
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RAW is not a color space.

I use AdobeRGB as my default. If I am going to post a picture on the web, I convert it to sRGB. I don't know if that's the best way, it's just the way I do it
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Old Jan 19, 2004, 11:33 PM   #3
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This question is impossible to answer. It all depends on your workflow.

How familiar are you with color spaces, color correction etc etc? Is your monitor properly calibrated, preferrably with a hardware device like a Spider?

If the answer is, I don't know, or I don't have a calibrated monitor, leave it at sRGB and you'll get great pictures.

If you're interested in squeezing the most possible color out of your system, doing accurate photo editing on your PC, AND you care about the output of your printer (or printer lab) to color match what you see on your monitor, then the above topics become important.

To somewhat answer your question: Adobe RGB has a larger color gamut than sRGB. But not by that much. It is better at the saturated colors, especially the red / oranges. sRGB is matched to the 'typical' monitor (whatever that means) that people use to view images. Displaying an adobe RGB image on a non-calibrated monitor will likely result in flat colors. Also, to post your images on the web you will have to convert to sRGB.

Some links if you want to learn more:

Introduction to color management:

http://www.naturephotographers.net/mh1201-1.html

sRGB vs adobe RGB discussion:

http://forums.naturephotographers.ne...3941&m=6681047

You will need to register before you can read these discussions. The above thread will advice to use adobe RGB or even RAW, but remember those are professional photographers that know exactly what they are doing, and their income depends on the best possible picture quality. The way they get that is to have a complete adobe RGB or RAW workflow setup.

Personally to me it is not worth it and i shoot in sRGB, and keep my workflow in sRGB. I don't even own the full version of photoshop (only PSE that came with the camera). If I want a raw or Adobe RGB workflow I will buy photshop first, and learn to use that properly. However, I do have a spider to calibrate my monitor, and that I can recommend to anyone doing any editing on their images.

Anyways, my 2 cents.

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Old Jan 20, 2004, 10:16 AM   #4
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Thanks for the references!.

I did attempt on non-instrumented monitor calibration, using the software supplied with the monitor. Then I did the simple practical approach to color management. My goal was for my monitor to closely represent my printer output.

I took an image from my camera that had shadow detail, a wide range of colors, flesh tones, and good latitude and printed it, without any software processing, in the default modes for the printer and camera. I then fine adjusted the monitors gamma and color balance until it looked as close to the print as possible. Now when I use that printer, and the same paper, I get at lest get predictable results.

I still am not certain which piece of hardware or software has precedence in the process, the video drivers, the embedded image info, monitor utilitly software, the photo processing software or the printer drivers and softare but ithis method seems to give me repeateable results. Some place to start experimenting with.

I will just use the tried and tested method of experimneting, and have fun on the journey. That's what a hobby is about.

Thanks for the practical adivce. now off to more reading and testing......
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Old Jan 20, 2004, 11:56 AM   #5
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You're welcome!

What you did (match your monitor to your printer) will work, obviously. But you now have a monitor setting that is non-standard. Any image edited on your system might look totally off viewed by someone else. It can also be off if you ever send it to a different printer (have a poster made at a photo lab, for example).

The good thing about having a properly calibrated monitor is that you can work in a standard color space and know that the colors you see are 'real'. Thus you can work in, for example, sRGB, and edit in that color space. Then, the resulting edited file will show up the same on any other properly calibrated output device. Be it a printer, or any other monitor. You do need to use a program like PS or PSE that actually has proper color management support built-in.

You can find all about color profiles at the ICC website: www.color.org. You might want to start reading here http://www.color.org/slidepres.html

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