Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Canon EOS dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Dec 27, 2011, 5:53 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 410
Default

The focal length setting for the lens is shown both on the lens barrel, and in the EXIF info in ZoomBrowser.

Kelly
KCook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 27, 2011, 5:54 PM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: MO
Posts: 92
Default Trials

These were not from our Christmas; they are from trial pictures I took the night before. I don't know if this is helpful or not, and I think I may have resized too small....
Attached Images
  
bkford is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 27, 2011, 5:57 PM   #13
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: MO
Posts: 92
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by KCook View Post
The focal length setting for the lens is shown both on the lens barrel, and in the EXIF info in ZoomBrowser.

Kelly
I see that now; had no idea it was there or what it meant. This is such news to me, that I should NOT use the zoom indoors in the evening.
bkford is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 27, 2011, 6:02 PM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: MO
Posts: 92
Default

I don't even know if I'm attaching these correctly. This one IS from our Christmas, one of the family groupings by the tree. Open to suggestions.
Attached Images
 
bkford is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 27, 2011, 6:50 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
iowa_jim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: North Central Iowa
Posts: 589
Default

What Kelly is saying about the zoom is that the more affordable lenses will have a smaller aperture (bigger number) when zoomed out. This lets less light in, which is a problem indoors.
iowa_jim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 27, 2011, 7:32 PM   #16
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: MO
Posts: 92
Default

See, I'm having such a problem with the terminology, because this is all new to me. In my mind, "zoomed out" means not zooming in--that is having it as "far away" as could be. What do you mean by "zoomed out" -- do you mean zooming as much as you can zoom?--that's what lets less light in?
bkford is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 27, 2011, 7:58 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 410
Default

Actually, the photos you've posted are nicely exposed. But too small to see any blur. It's unfortunate that posting photos on message boards is difficult, but that is the way it is. This all might be a lot easier if you showed your photos to the staff at a real camera store (not Best Buy or any other big box store) near you.

Kelly
KCook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 27, 2011, 8:29 PM   #18
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: MO
Posts: 92
Default

Okay, Kelly. Actually, I didn't save any of the blurred ones. I took 105 pictures and ended up with about 45 that were pretty good, I thought. I was posting these for any needed input on focal length, light, etc. I have studied the focal length on each picture I took that night. Clarify for me one more time--the larger the focal length number means the more ZOOMED IN (closer to the subject) I was, and that is worse as far as potential for not great photos? Almost 100% of mine were between 25 and 38, so I think I was okay on that (I thought I zoomed in more than that). But, I need to make sure I understand that the more zoomed in I am, the potentially poorer the quality of picture? (Talking about indoors, evening.)
bkford is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 27, 2011, 9:02 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
iowa_jim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: North Central Iowa
Posts: 589
Default

This would be a good time to review exposure. And I might have been misleading by saying zoomed-out. I was thinking maxed-out on the zoom.

Three things affect the exposure - the shutter speed, the aperature, and the sensor sensitivity (iso speed, similar to film speed). The longer the shutter is open, the longer the light is let in to the sensor. The aperture is the size of the opening that lets light through. The bigger the aperture, the greater the amount of light that comes in. To make this confusing, the aperture gets smaller as the f-stop number gets higher. The sensor sensitivity is analagous to film speed, where iso1600 will be used to take pictures in low light and iso 100 is for outdoor daytime activities.

Back to the aperture. The expensive lenses are commonly a constant-aperture lens. This is handy because the lens will have a max aperture of 4 at 24mm and 105mm. The affordable lenses will have smaller apertures available as the lens goes from wide to telephoto. So a lens might have a max aperture of 3.5 at 18mm, but 5.6 at 55mm. Because of the smaller aperture when zoomed in, err, at the telephoto range, less light will come in, forcing higher iso and/or longer shutter speeds.

In such cases, a person could leave their lens as wide as possible to get the biggest aperture, then use the time-tested foot-zoom method.

So we discussed the basic exposure triangle. As you might suspect, there are trade-offs involved.
iowa_jim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 27, 2011, 9:12 PM   #20
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: MO
Posts: 92
Default

Well, I am encouraged, because this is actually starting to make sense to me, and not 24 hours ago, it was very much like the first time I opened a DOS manual to partition the hard drive and install DOS on my new IBM XT, back in the mid-1980's. This does make sense, and I had no idea that zooming in was not a good thing to do for indoor evening shots. I also now know it is not a sin against my camera to actually use the Intelligent Auto mode, at least for now, and that is what I should have done on my Christmas pictures. However, in the end, after deleting all the blurred ones and editing a bit on the remaining, I am actually very pleased with my Christmas pictures, so I think I'll keep the T3i! But, I really appreciate all the help, and as long as I am making progress, I am happy. I understand a lot more now, thanks to all of you who have helped me. Any other tips anyone wants to post, please do; I am saving all this information to study more. This makes way more sense to me than the two manuals I have tried to read.
bkford is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:23 AM.