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Old Jan 30, 2004, 7:57 PM   #11
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Yeah, I realized that as soon as I posted. Sorry about that. Someone else suggested f/16 and Ritchie said he was going to try f/8 or f/16. I guess lenses are cheaper if you don't want more than f/8!

WIllie
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Old Jan 30, 2004, 11:57 PM   #12
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unclewillie

I just responded to your own string on this exact issue (inconsistent focusing on DRebel). It seems to me here that you have crossed the line and become a bit less than objective in the matter. I'm responding here for one reason only, to ensure that those seeking to purchase a Rebel understand that others, like myself, who have purchased this camera are completely happy with the AF. I too have a 50mm f 1.8, which I use for basketball where I follow subjects relying entirely on the AF "single point" AF. I've posted photos at your string and see no need to repeat the effort here.

I appreciated that you brought this potential to the attention of others in the forum. However, I also think that you may be standing on a soap box a bit because you have returned this camera and you don't wish that decision to ultimately turn against you.

Just a thought.

Cheers
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Old Jan 31, 2004, 9:59 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unclewillie
ohenry, Are you seriously suggesting that people don't set the f stop wider than f/16? I'm glad I returned the camera if that is the only way to get a decent focus!

By the way, using aperture priority was not my suggestion. I was just commenting on somone else's suggestion.

Willie
Bubb...

you're missing the point... F stop doesn't getting wider when you stop down tho F/16, the larger the number on AV, the smaller openning of the lens, you get more DOF when you stop down the lens.

Why aperture priority mode?, he is shooting indoor, low light, to assure the optimum DOF, I suggest using AV mode, set at F8, F11 or F16, otherwise, if you shoot at P or full auto mode, the camera automatically selects larger aperture(samller number) to get the optimum shutter speed, and therefore, very limited DOF could result in front and back out of focus, in case of close-focus, even worse. At F/16, in low light will result in a very slow shutter speed which the camera tends to select, that why to avoid camera vibration, I also suggest using tripod and even recommend to shoot in timer mode, at slow synchro speed, abient light will mix with flash light(if you turn the flash on, in AV mode, camera does not automatically pop up flash like in full automode), that the beauty of it (if you put a person on front of a lighted christmas tree, and you don't shoot in slow synchro mode, flash light will dominate the ambient light and kills all the beauty of existing light), you can shoot with the flash off if you want the effect of the 100% ambient light. Damm it...., if you do this test outdoor with bight sun light, you don'd have to follow my suggestion, you can see the result for yourself.


Before blaming on your camera, you must learn to understand the basic of exposure in photography, it's only a useful tool if you know how to use it. Defective is another issue, but not every camera is perfectly created equal, but same kind of camera must has same features and standards, don't jump on the conclusion too fast...

Life is good, but...tough...
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Old Jan 31, 2004, 10:47 AM   #14
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tuanokc

Quote:
Before blaming on your camera
I've read a number of your other posts in this forum. Your posting style perhaps leaves something to be desired in the area of sympathy and kindness, yet it rings of knowledge and clarity. And here I agree with you again.

I'm getting a bit miffed at some of these pseudo-scientific ruler guys Time to stand on my own soap box:

What does one do with these people with their crude little rulers and tests who attempt to gain attention by competing with Canon which spends multi-millions on specific equipment that tests exactly what they are attempting to do with their crude little caveman rulers? Have they forgotten that Canon "L" lenses are world renowned and their AF system, with focus assist, is one of their major selling features? Do these amateurs with their little plastic rulers really think that Canon hasn't tested this stuff ad infinutum, with little rulers and other pin-point measuring equipment that would blow those foolish rulers of theirs so far out of the water that their little plastic numbers would melt. As well, what about the competing companies? Don't you think that they would be advertising this serious flaw with Canon equipment, especially the Rebel which is probably coming close to outselling every other camera on the market right now? What does this competitors' silence tell us? I'll tell you what it tells us. It tells us that these people with their little rulers who come on to forums like this attempting to be scientists should learn how to use their more complex cameras or sell them and buy a point-and-shoot HP. That way they will save time and money (on rulers), and they wouldn't be deceiving potential consumers at online forums like this one.

Cheers
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Old Jan 31, 2004, 11:11 AM   #15
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Norm...

very well said...
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Old Jan 31, 2004, 2:03 PM   #16
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Tuanokc, bad choice of words. I didnt mean wider I meant higher. I know how aperatures work. I just can't type. Like I said I have been using an EOS SLR since 1985.

You compeletely missed MY point. Try taking a picture of a one year old (as the original poster was asking about) indoors with f/16 or higher. In aperature priority mode the shutter will be slow even with the flash on. A tripod and timer does you no good when the subject (a one year old) is moving as one year olds always do. Even if you use a flash the shutter speed will be too slow in aperature priority mode. You need full manual mode as someone els e correctly pointed out .

You can go to any Danon DSLR forum and read about focus issues with the D10 or DRebel and the response is always the same: Get a point and shoot, you need to learn how to use it, "The Rebel takes soft images and you nded to do post processing on all of your images to 'add sharpness'" and "mine works fine."

Norm, Sorry, I didn't shell out the big bucks for an L series Lens. I had the same experiance with the Tamron 28-300 lens and my old trusty Canon 50 mm f/1.8. The reason I took the ruler pic is I wanted to see if It really was front focussing. Do you not agree that the field of focus is well in front of the subject? I was using center point AF and the center point was glowing red right where the cell phone was.

By the way, I find it somewhat disingenuous that YOU also asked me to post a picture on the other thread and then you post here" What does one do with these people with their crude little rulers and tests" You asked for a photo, I posted one.

Willie
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Old Jan 31, 2004, 10:40 PM   #17
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willie

I was quite happy to thank you for posting that photograph in the other string. That isn't the reason for my response here. My response in this string is what I interpret to be somewhat emotional postings and trashings of helpful suggestions by other posters like o henry. I'm not sure that sort of thing is going to be helpful to anyone who is seriously considereing the purchase of a Rebel and hasn't read the many very positive comments on this camera by owners like myself.

Quote:
Do you not agree that the field of focus is well in front of the subject? I was using center point AF and the center point was glowing red right where the cell phone was.
I can agree that it appears that your expected focus isn't where you wished it to be, yes. But, as some here have said, a variety of factors could well come into play here that neither you nor I have even considered.

If you are happy that you have returned this camera, then great. And it's also good if you share your experiences in a forum so people can make a proper decision via a balanced spectrum of opinions and views. What "isn't" great is how you seem to be relegating other opinions to the level of foolish.

I'm sure you didn't mean to do that but sometimes we say things in an emotional state that we wouldn't say in a completely objective state-of-mind. I know that I myself said a few things about the FZ10 that I'm now sorry about. The camera wasn't doing something that I thought it would be able to do but it really isn't designed to do.

Cheers, and thanks again for your input on the focus thing. At least I have your opinion in my bag to pull out if and when I ever need it in the future.
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Old Jan 31, 2004, 10:54 PM   #18
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Here's my take on focus issues.

I spent $1500 on a 10D camera body. I spent $1700 on a "L" lens for it. I EXPECT it to work as advertised technically for that kind of money.

I'm learning how to take good pictures. I do not need the uncertanty that my bad picture might have been caused by bad equipment that does not know how to focus. If there's a bad picture I would love to be able to say definitively that my technique was wrong, not my camera plus lens combo.

Yes, I did the focus tests. Yes, I sent my setup back to Canon for calibration (took 3 weeks) and yes, the results were better after I got it all back.

Thanks,
Barthold
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Old Jan 31, 2004, 10:58 PM   #19
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I'm going to do the exact test myself right now. I'll have something posted within the hour.

It will be with 50mm f1.8

Thanks barthold for an informative post.
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Old Jan 31, 2004, 11:02 PM   #20
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Hi Normcar,

Unfortunately you'll have to test all your lenses. The reason being that both the camera and the lens can be off in focus. If the lens is front focusing and the camera back focusing, it might cancel each other out.

It is best to do this test in daylight, the AF system works best. Obviously use a tripod and remote shutter release. If you have an IS lens don't forget to turn IS off (unless it is the latest generation IS). Remove any filters you might have on your lenses, and use the widest aperture you can.

Barthold

PS Did you get your 70-200?
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