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Old Oct 26, 2012, 8:25 PM   #1
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First, if the moderators want to move this thread, please do so. I was not sure where to put it.

Now, to my question:

Tomorrow, I'm shooting using a 70-200 2.8 IS lens. I may put a 2x extender on it.

So I'm going to be using a monopod to help with stability.

But I don't know how to use it properly. Can you help?

Do you hold the camera same way you always do and just rest the camera on the monopod? My lens has a mounting ring, so I'm not mounting the mono to the camera, but to the ring.

I'd appreciate any help on how to stabilize it.

Faithfully yours,
FP
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Old Oct 27, 2012, 7:56 AM   #2
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I tend to get the best use of mine by making a "bipod" of it. I place the base of the monopod just to the inside of my right foot. Then, gripping the monopod just below the camera, I pull back slightly while also rotating my leg inwards slightly. This allows for the monopod to make contact with my shin just below my knee cap and in effect giving the base a little more stability. Using this method I'm able to adjust the amount of tugging as necessary to keep the rig steady.
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Old Oct 27, 2012, 8:47 AM   #3
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The weight of the lens (which is heavier than the camera) is on the monopod. It will be steadiest if you keep it as vertical as possible. Your body will cause it to sway a bit (because in our attempt to stand upright, we use a feedback loop to constantly correct our balance), so any method to steady yourself, such as the method mentioned by Quadna71, will increase your chance of success. It won't be as good as a tripod, but it will be a lot better than if you weren't using anything.
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Old Oct 27, 2012, 4:23 PM   #4
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This is what I do.
Use the lens mount. Hold the lens by the barrel in front of the mount. Take a breath slightly deeper than normal, exhale slowly as you gently squeeze the shutter button.
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Old Oct 27, 2012, 10:51 PM   #5
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IMO a 70-200 f/2.8 (or a 100-400L) is too light to require a monopod...

If anything I would remove the tripod collar of theses two lenses first to make them even lighter to handhold
-> Adding a monopod to this type of lens make it more cumbersome (and heavier to carry around) to shoot with! Are you trying to help stabilizing a lens which already has IS (kind of defeating the purpose)?
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Last edited by NHL; Oct 27, 2012 at 10:54 PM.
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Old Oct 28, 2012, 6:34 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NHL View Post
If anything I would remove the tripod collar of theses two lenses first to make them even lighter to handhold
The lens mount can only support so much weight without being damaged. Any lens that comes with a tripod mount is heavier than the camera, and, if for no other reason, the tripod collar should serve as a reminder to support the camera/lens combination by the lens, not the camera. That is, if you've got a 2 pound lens on a 3 pound body, you should support the body and let the mount support the lens, but if you've got a 4 pound lens on a 3 pound body you should support the lens and let the mount support the body. If only to serve as a reminder of that relationship, I would (and do) keep tripod collars in place.
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