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Old Feb 22, 2004, 1:26 AM   #1
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Default Filters

I don't know much about filters but I would like a circular polarize filter(to make blue skies) and a Flourescent filter(to take the greenish cast out of white walls and floors in rooms with flourescent lighting). My local camera store carries Quantaray filters. He said it is made by Sigma. Any comments good or bad about these filters would be appreciated. Are these the right filters for what I want them to do.
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Old Feb 22, 2004, 7:05 AM   #2
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A circular polarizer is fine to get.

However the fluorescent light can be fixed more easily with a white balance or a correct camera setting! No need to add another unecessary element in front of the lens...
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Old Feb 22, 2004, 8:38 PM   #3
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As far as I know, Quantaray filters are NOT made by Sigma. A good portion of the lenses are though. (I know this cause I work for the Ritz/Kits/Wolf/Inkleys/Camera Shop conglomerate). I have tried to find out, but corporate tells me that the manufacturer of the glass for the filters varies, depending on the type.
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Old Feb 22, 2004, 8:45 PM   #4
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What lens do you have? Top of the line filters are made by B+W or Hoya, but they are expensive. If you have a top of the line lens, get a good filter with it.

What camera do you have? With the 10D you can set a custom white balance to take care of the green casts. Take a picture of the white wall, and 'import' that picture as your custom white balance. From now on any picture taken in that light environment will look correct. See your 10D manual on how to do this. Maybe the 300D does this too?

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Old Feb 22, 2004, 10:28 PM   #5
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Default Answer to your questions.

I have a 300D. Well actually I am waiting for it to be delivered so I don't have it yet. The camera that had the greenish cast to all the flourescent lighting photos was my Canon S50. I guess I am getting the cart before the horse. I just assumed that was a problem with ALL digital cameras and flourescent lighting. If not then I don't need a filter except to protect my lens. I will have the 18-55mm lens that comes with the Rebel and two old EF lenses that I have for my Canon Elan.
I use to be fairly knowledgeable about photography but that has been over 10 years ago. With the fact that there has been so much technology advancements and the fact that I have forgotten a lot of what I learned, I guess I have a whole lot to learn. The old theory "if you don't use it you lose it."
Should I get B&H or Hoya filters for these lenses or do you think the Quantatary will be fine?
I'm sure I will be using this board a lot while I am learning. Thanks for all of your guy's help and suggestions.
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Old Feb 22, 2004, 11:03 PM   #6
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I would get a cheaper UV filter than a Hoya or B+W. One thing I don't know is if you have to worry about vignetting at the wide end with the 18-55 lens. If that is the case you might want to get a thin circular polarizer. Maybe someone here knows?

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Old Feb 23, 2004, 8:47 AM   #7
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I have a Canon UV filter on my 18-55mm and I haven't had any problems with vignetting. It's quite thin, a circular polarizer might be a bit thicker but it shouldn't be a problem.

On the 300D there are two built in flourescent light white balance settings that work quite well. My basement is lit with compact flourescents so I'm used to the green cast to every thing. If you've got a mix of lighting the custom white balance is a nice way of dealing with things.

The D300's auto white balance is poor when shooting indoors. You should adjust to incandescant or flourescant as needed. But don't forget to change it back when you go outside.

An ebook I had for my old Nikon 950 suggested that you could 'fake' a coloured filter by taking a picture of a coloured piece of paper that was the compliment of the colour you wanted. EG a blue paper to achieve a yellow filter effect (am I right with that combo??). I've never done it nor am I planning on doing it but custom white balance with a white sheet of paper is something I've done and it has worked.
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Old Feb 23, 2004, 10:24 PM   #8
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Ah good, thus the 300D has custom white balance. Yes I agree, that works like a charm. The biggest thing to remember is to change your white balance setting once you take your camera somewhere else!

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Old Feb 24, 2004, 8:37 AM   #9
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I have a sigma 50-500 and shoot a lot of birds around the lake from a boat. What would be the best type of filter to get for this lens and my shooting Circular Polarizer and UV? It is 86mm.
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Old Feb 24, 2004, 8:38 AM   #10
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Sorry it should say Circular Polarizer or UV filter?
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