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Old Feb 25, 2004, 4:58 PM   #1
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Default Is USB 1.1 a problem - how to transer pictures?

Hi

I am about to buy a 300D - but have a question on how to transfer pictures that I haven't seen a comment on so far: is the USB 1.1 a problem? I mean, it works unacceptable slow for such large files, doesn't it?

How do one transfer pictures to the computer? Through a card reader - and if: is that satisfying?

Thanks

Morten
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Old Feb 25, 2004, 5:25 PM   #2
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It's not a "problem", but it is a much slower way to transfer information than USB 2.0 or firewire. You could always add a USB card to your computer for 20-40 bucks.

Card readers are the easiest way to transfer, although you can also transfer directly from the camera with the included cable. Many printers also have card readers installed.

If you're going to be transferring a lot of high resolution pictures, you will eventually want to add a USB 2.0 or firewire port to your computer and an associated reader.
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Old Feb 25, 2004, 5:54 PM   #3
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I got a USB1 reader with my CF card. It work, but I will eventually replace it with either firewire or USB2 (which are both built into my PC.) USB1 is very slow.

Eric
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Old Feb 25, 2004, 8:37 PM   #4
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USB1.1 is sorta slow - but if you remember a decade ago when floppy drives were used (3.5" sqaure media), they were a heck of a lot slower than USB for data transfers.

Also, be careful of USB2 standards. There are two - USB2 full speed is essentially the same as USB1.1 speed. USB2 high speed is the one to get 480MB/s data throughput (differentiate from the sticker on the USB device, it'll either be full speed or high speed).

Even the newer cameras like the Nikon D70 which claim to have USB2 have only USB2.0 high speed, which is no faster than USB1.1, but looks better from a marketting point of view because people by and large are ignorant of the differences.
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Old Feb 26, 2004, 12:07 AM   #5
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Interesting. I don't see mention of "USB2 Full Speed" on the usb standard's web page. Nope, I take that back. It took a lot of hunting, but it's in the Technical Compliance PDF form for USB2.

When I did a little google searching I found reference to USB2 full speed as 12MB (same as USB1.1) in products. But they didn't have the USB2 logo on it, they had the USB1 logo.

Now that really sucks. This is part of what the USB licensing organization was supposed to prevent. There are days I really hate corporations and marketing in general. Does anyone actually care about the comsumer any more(beyond their money?)

Eric
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Old Feb 26, 2004, 8:17 AM   #6
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If you have a computer that has only usb 1.1, how do you "add" or "upgrade" to usb 2 (high speed, of course)? How much does it generally cost? Thanks!

Amy
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Old Feb 26, 2004, 8:59 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amytude
If you have a computer that has only usb 1.1, how do you "add" or "upgrade" to usb 2 (high speed, of course)? How much does it generally cost? Thanks!

Amy
You can add a USB peripheral card to your computer. The cost should be under 50 bucks or so. You can find them at any computer store or Best Buy/Circuit City/etc. Adding one is a simple process, but for the computer challenged the place you buy it will generally install it for a nominal fee.
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Old Feb 26, 2004, 9:18 AM   #8
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Thanks, ohenry. Is this an internal peripheral?
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Old Feb 26, 2004, 10:43 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amytude
Thanks, ohenry. Is this an internal peripheral?
Yes, it's a card that fits into one of your available slots on your motherboard. It is simply a matter of turning off and unplugging your computer, opening your case, removing the blank cover and inserting the card into the available slot. After the installation, you can reinstall the cover, plug in and restart your computer. If you have WinXP, it should recognize the card. With Win98/ME, you may have to install drivers.

If you have a MAC, follow whatever steps are necessary for MAC...I'm not familiar with MAC hardware.
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Old Feb 26, 2004, 11:51 AM   #10
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I'd concur with ohenry on the description. Of course, I've built every PC I've owned so some of the small but important steps I might not think of.

One is to make sure you are grounded. Don't do the computer surgery on a shag rug or wearing a sweater. Make sure you touch some grounded metal before you start working (an electrical outlet plate isn't a bad one.) Don't want to fry internal parts of the computer by mistake.

Eric
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