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Old Mar 10, 2004, 5:22 PM   #21
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barthold, OHenry

I have to say that I didn't remember what the manual said what I wrote what I wrote... but I have used AI Servo often for flying birds and the bird stays in focus even when it leaves the center AF point (which I leave as the default.) So it sure look to me like that is how it worked.

Eric
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Old Mar 10, 2004, 6:22 PM   #22
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Hey Eric,

The manual could very well be wrong! Are you sure the bird wasn't covering the center AF point at all, *and* the bird was changing the distance between you and it while you were tracking? If the distance stayed the same it would stay in focus (unless of course the camera starts focussing on whatever was behind the bird).

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Old Mar 10, 2004, 7:13 PM   #23
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So true... I've not done lots of flight-bird photography but some, and they are often coming at me (I have a great Osprey series from a vacation last year.) But I can't say for sure that they leave the center point. I think they do, but the only way to really tell would be to test it intentionally.

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Old Mar 10, 2004, 8:48 PM   #24
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I get a headache trying to figure out the details of how this or that works. I just take pictures based on the sound mechanics I've used with SLR's for years. When things don't behave as I suspect they should, then I investigate and/or experiment. I'm not one that cares to get into the technical details -- just enough so that I can get the pictures I want. I spent too many years (in a previous life ) being a techician to have to worry about details now. I read all the techie stuff a lot of you guys talk about, but focus on the how rather than the why
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Old Mar 10, 2004, 11:21 PM   #25
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That is basically how I've gone about learning this camera. I worry about it when I don't "get it" by doing it. This has generally worked, although on occasion it bites me with this like what the graphic is for the different metering modes (I truly don't get what they were thinking when they assigned those!)

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Old Mar 11, 2004, 1:11 AM   #26
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Yup, doing it is the way to learn! Interesting to hear though that almost everyone uses the center AF point. First I thought Sigma was nuts bringing out the SD10 with only a center AF point, but now I'm not so sure anymore.

I'm with Eric on the graphics for the metering modes, those absolutely do not make sense to me. I keep thinking I should make a cheat-sheet and take it with me, but I never do :-)

Barthold
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Old Mar 11, 2004, 9:13 AM   #27
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Actually, I've been thinking about making a cheat sheet myself. It could have exposure tips, things to check before you leave the house (what ISO are you on? Do you have the battery and CF in the camera? exposure "Rule of thumb"s, maybe a f-stop list, meter-mode pictures, I don't know...)

The SD10 only has 1 AF point? Does it have a AF tracking mode? Or is it really a studio camera?

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Old Mar 11, 2004, 3:14 PM   #28
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Well, the "good" thing about 7-point AF is that the camera will almost always focus on something You can't release the shutter in basic modes until it focuses. Once you progress beyond point-click-and-hope it will usually betray you though.

That was my point in trying to quantify the AF Servo mode; once you understand how it works, you can usually modify your behavior to make it do what you want, instead of whatever it feels like.
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Old Mar 14, 2004, 3:01 AM   #29
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I generally use the center focusing point, but occasionally use another focusing point when shooting portraits. I never turn all the focusing points on.

I do use several of the Custom Functions to make manuvering between focus points easier.

C.Fn-07(0) - Set the center auto focus point to be the home position.

C.Fn-13(1) - Set the assist button to select home position.

This setup makes it real easy to switch to the center focus point at any time - just press the assist button.

-jb
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Old Mar 14, 2004, 7:58 PM   #30
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I use CFn 13-2. In that mode you need to hold down the assist button to go to the home AF position. In my case, the home position is all seven. This allows me to switch to using all seven if I feel the need, and when I release the assist button I'm back on my single center AF point.

I wish CFn 13-1 was a toggle between two different AF point selections. But it is not, you can switch to the home position but not back to the other position. (Hope that was clear). Unless I missed something?

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