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Old Mar 14, 2004, 11:05 PM   #31
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Kinda late to add to the trend, but I'm using more and more all other 4 AF points around the center one. This is very handy when I use the 50-500 EX HSM @ 500mm and close distance to even small birds.

This way I focus on the bird eye/head, and everything is part of the image. Being very close at 500mm, even with Finch, if you use center AF, focus at the head, there's good chance the entire bird won't be in the frame.

Most of the time, I'll use the upper AF, if the subject is vertical, if it's a larger bird, I might use the left and right one. And if its a squirrel going down a tree, I will use the bottom one.

Takes some practice to change these quickly, but its feasible.

I never had to bother with all those 4 AF points with a 300mm lens, unless the subject was big and close. So I adapted my shooting according to the focal length of the lens.

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Old Mar 15, 2004, 1:15 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barthold
I use CFn 13-2. In that mode you need to hold down the assist button to go to the home AF position. In my case, the home position is all seven. This allows me to switch to using all seven if I feel the need, and when I release the assist button I'm back on my single center AF point.
I've never had much luck with all seven turned on at the same time. I spend time trying to move so the correct point is in focus, or get an out-of-focus picture.

Quote:
Originally Posted by barthold
I wish CFn 13-1 was a toggle between two different AF point selections. But it is not, you can switch to the home position but not back to the other position. (Hope that was clear). Unless I missed something?
That would be nice. I press the AF Point Selector button when I want to switch from the center focusing point. It starts with the center point every time... I just move it where I want and press the button again... at least you can see the focusing points on the top LCD panel... you don't have to look through the viewfinder...

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Old Mar 21, 2004, 3:38 AM   #33
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Hi Eric Can,

As I understand you correctly, you use those focus points so you don't have to re-compose? That is interesting. Re-composing has disadvantages too. The worst being you (or the bird) might move and therefore get an out-of-focus picture. For example, say you just use the center AF point. Focus on the head / eye of the bird, then move the camera down to get the whole bird in the viewfinder, then take the shot.

Right?

Barthold
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Old Mar 21, 2004, 10:40 PM   #34
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I totally agree with you guy about the metering modes. I had to stop myself when I was up in Philly this weekend. Whoever designed those symbols must have really been messed up at the time. :lol:
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Old Mar 21, 2004, 11:50 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barthold
Hi Eric Can,

As I understand you correctly, you use those focus points so you don't have to re-compose? That is interesting. Re-composing has disadvantages too. The worst being you (or the bird) might move and therefore get an out-of-focus picture. For example, say you just use the center AF point. Focus on the head / eye of the bird, then move the camera down to get the whole bird in the viewfinder, then take the shot.

Right?

Barthold
Sorry about the long waiting period to reply.

I use this method only if my subject fllls literally the viewfinder, that's about it. I played with recompose today, works great with the DRebel, one thing I noticed though is, if you focus on the eye / near the eye, then recompose for better framing, the time you wait while having the shutter half press is important. What I mean is, if I wait too long, the AI will kick in and then I loose focus (M mode), but I do it in less than 2-3 sec, it works great.

Also, I tend to use the top focus point even if I recompose, that's valuable for standing birds.

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Old Mar 22, 2004, 12:09 PM   #36
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I guess that is one of the subtle differences (And advantages) with the 10D. I read what you wrote and thought "What the heck did AI kick in for?" and then I realized that you are on a DRebel, which does some funky things like that.

Eric
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Old Mar 22, 2004, 12:35 PM   #37
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Yes Eric, I know the DRebel limitation, AI will kick in if you wait too long with the shutter half-pressed. It's just a question of getting use to it, not wait that long.

My next EOS SLR will probably be a big jump. I have my eyes over a 1D Mark II for this fall. Unless there's a new 10D coming out that will be a good jump over the DRebel.

Been lurking at the 1.3x crop large 8MP CMOS sensor with DIGIC II and all those other nice feature very attracting with the 1D Mark II.

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Old Mar 22, 2004, 3:57 PM   #38
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When I started playig with the 300D I found lots of new buttons and knobs and so decided that rather than try to learn what they all did in one go, I'd take it a few at a time.

So I started with the basic "modes".

One of the first problems I noticed with this was the AF point chosen by the camera was often less than ideal. Usually releasing the button and re-trying it would re-plan and do what I wanted. But more than once I came home and downloaded the card and found otherwise promising pictures spoiled because the camera had picked the wrong place to focus and I hadn't noticed.

So no my preferred config is to use the "creative" settings for the most part, and I have the focus point manual-set to centre.

If I go back to a "basic" mode, it'll be on auto-point-select automatically, so I don't have to fumble with the point selectoin config should I want them all on for any reason.

I'm rapidly getting to the point where I can't see the point in the "basic" settings anyway. I hate automatic cars too - they're good for automatically not doing quite what you want them to do. Was good for leaving half the work to the camrea whilst I was getting used to where the buttons were, now I'm comfortable with the layout, I'll drive...
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Old Mar 30, 2004, 4:14 AM   #39
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Beginners question I'm afraid- if you focus with just the centre point does it take an exposure reading here as well or is it averaged over the whole view?
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Old Mar 30, 2004, 9:41 AM   #40
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mikeuk1,

No, the exposure metering is separate. It is controlled by the metering mode you (or the camera) selects.

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