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Old Mar 22, 2004, 10:44 PM   #1
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Default Lens for Indoor Volleyball

Hi, I recently bought a the 300D kit and am having a lot fun with it. What kind of lens do people recommend for shooting indoor volleyball? I cannot use a flash. Sometimes I can get close to the game but other times not. I been thinking the Sigma 70-200mm f2.8 might be a good one but perhaps I could get by with a shorter lens. Thanks.
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Old Mar 23, 2004, 1:42 AM   #2
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You have only one option, the 70-200 IS USM, but you already knew that didn't y ou.
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Old Mar 23, 2004, 4:25 PM   #3
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I shoot a lot of gymnastic which is a NO FLASH sport..

I guess I'm going to have to disagree with Norm...

(My understanding which could be totally wrong is an IS lens might not be of much help when shooting sports... main objective of IS is to help with camera shake...)

I have 3 lens in my bag:

Canon 50mm 1.8
Tamron 28-75 2.8 Xr Di
Sigma 70-200 2.8

Here's some samples...

http://www.tammyandjohn.com/PhotoAlb...0904/index.htm
http://www.tammyandjohn.com/PhotoAlb...d_04/index.htm
http://www.tammyandjohn.com/PhotoAlb...z_04/index.htm
http://www.tammyandjohn.com/PhotoAlb...e_04/index.htm

And don't be afraid to crank up the ISO... most of mine are ISO 800 or ISO 1600 and then processed with NeatImage. I get very acceptable results!
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Old Mar 23, 2004, 4:55 PM   #4
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Quote:
I guess I'm going to have to disagree with Norm...
I've read various comments on the Sigma 70-200 and they seem to be all over the board, which scares me a bit. Some say that it has a soft focus wide open which isn't what I want personally. My 100mm F2 is slightly soft wide open as well and I get frustrated with that because I bought the thing to be able to utilize the wide open setting indoors.

I've never heard one bad review on the 70-200 L IS and that's perhaps why I suggest it as the "only" option.

I've read some wonderful reviews on the Sigma, and I'm quite happy with my 50-500 by Sigma, but my Sigma 500 flash died on me this last weekend in the midst of an important basketball event, which put a very bad taste in my mouth.

I think I'm going to save up for the Canon IS L where I don't need to worry so much about quality control factors. If I could spend my money all over again, from the beginning, the very first lens that I would purchase would be the 70-200 L IS, without a doubt. I'm learning but it's costly.

Minolta is coming out with an image stabalized SLR soon which will make every lens IS. Ack...$$$

Your gymnastics photos are excellent, and you do a great job with Neat Image as well. Sometimes things can look plastic with that software (I have it myself), but you seem to have worked out a great profile Sag.

I've picked up alot from your commentary and appreciate your input. Happy shutterbugging!
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Old Mar 23, 2004, 5:36 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Normcar
Minolta is coming out with an image stabilized SLR soon which will make every lens IS. Ack...$$$
I have to agree with Mr_Saginaw as well... IS will work if you're shooting @ static walls it can not do wonder when the actual subject(s) move. There's the 50mm f/1.4-1.8 and the 85mm f1.2-1.8 for that, as well as some f/2's, short of this any 70-200 2.8 will be the next compromise!
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Old Mar 23, 2004, 7:18 PM   #6
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Cut and paste from photo.net...please respond NHL, I value your opinion.

R. J. , jan 27, 2004; 04:53 a.m.
Has anyone had experience with the IS built into the 300mm and 400mm f/2.8 Canon lenses?

Most camera blur is the result of up-and-down (rather than side-to- side) movement. Hence the usefulness of monopods.


Canon IS has two modes, including one for panned shots. Sounds good. Any comments?

Answers
Stephen Sonne , jan 27, 2004; 06:57 a.m.
I own the 70-200 IS lens and I think the image stabilization works a-s-t-o-u-n-d-i-n-g-l-y well.
Worth every one of the extra 100,000 or so pennies it cost !

And another response from the same forum:

I shoot motorsports though less now with CART out of business. I bought the 300mm 2.8L for the flexability that it can add to a lens system that has to be carried all day for days at a time around a race track. It's nearly a perfect lens in terms of flexability, an incredible 300mm f/2.8 and with the eF 1.4X an excellent 420mm f/4 and a still perfectly usable 600mm f/5.6 lens with the EF 2X. No other single lens fills so many lens needs in a lens that can be walked around with.


Canon's IS lenses are fantastic!

Here's the string: http://www.photo.net/bboard/q-and-a-...?msg_id=007C4Q
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Old Mar 23, 2004, 7:48 PM   #7
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I own a 70-200 f/2.8 IS model and can attest that it is indeed a wonderful lens. But as has been pointed out, IS minimizes the effects of camera movement, not subject movement. When shooting sports you want to be at a speed that will stop action and that speed would minimize the effects of camera shake any way. The panning mode (IS mode 2) may prove to be more useful, however (depending on the sport). I have taken panned pictures of birds in flight and have been amazed by the IS.

Bottom line, if you're buying a lens that has an option of IS, it is worth consideration because it is a very useful feature. One must of course weigh in the cost factor, which is significant.
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Old Mar 23, 2004, 7:58 PM   #8
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Normcar

You are comparing two different conditions:
1 - Indoor: I agree that IS will let you shoot at lower speed, provided it's faster than the subject movement; However in most case it's not and why people have to resort to f/1.2-1.8 when no flashes are allowed. You know that from your basketball pictures that no IS or tripod can freeze an action but a higher shutter speed (ie faster lenses with bigger aperture opening)
2 - Outdoor: IS help you in one axis while panning help in the other, you are effectively negating the movement in the x-axis by following the subject; However IS does not freeze the rotational speed of the wheels or the ups & down of the motorcyles from a distance... it can not sense theses movements and might even counteract in the opposite direction - You tilt the camera down when the motorcyle hit an upward bump is perfectly good and valid example -> twice the displacements instead of no IS!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ohenry
One must of course weigh in the cost factor, which is significant.
... and I agree 100%! :P
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Old Mar 23, 2004, 8:23 PM   #9
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Okay, NHL, thanks for the input, and please correct me if I am wrong in any of my interpretations below. I'm going to purchase the 70-200 IS no matter what because it's like the center of the circle as far as I can see. If I want IS then I am able to receive it, if I don't, I just turn it off. That can't happen when you don't have it. The option is important to me, and the f-stop range is extremely important to me. I'm with many out there in various forums who say that the 70-200 IS is perhaps the best lens ever made, in both quality and ability.

NHL, here's my question:

If you had the cash and you were a sports photographer and that was all that you did, what lens would you purchase, the Sigma or the Canon IS?

Please be a bit specific about why you choose what you do, thanks again!
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Old Mar 23, 2004, 8:43 PM   #10
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Quote:
If you had the cash and you were a sports photographer and that was all that you did, what lens would you purchase, the Sigma or the Canon IS?
Don't forget to consider the Canon non-IS f/2.8 ... same quality glass without the IS and $500-$600 less.
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