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Old Mar 27, 2004, 8:25 AM   #1
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Default Is the Rebel 300D to advanced for a beginner??

Hi
I want to buy my 2nd digital camera and need some advice. My first camera was a pentax optio 230 which was ok for what i wanted back when I bought it(point and shoot). But now i want to get write into digital photography. I have been reading every camera review on the internet.

I was thinking about upgrading to a Panasonic FZ10, its got quite good reviews and has alot more features than my pentax, to experiment with.

Then I read about the canon rebel, how awsome it is for the price the features ect. I have not read one bad review about it. The only thing is that alot of the features this camera has i would have no clue how they work :?: But Im very keen on learning.

So I was thinking about spending the extra dollars and getting the rebel. Or should I start with somthing like the FZ10??Will I be wasting my money or can I learn to use all the features the camera has to offer.

Any help would be great.
Thanks
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Old Mar 27, 2004, 9:24 AM   #2
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As long as you're willing and able to read the instruction manual, it is not too difficult to learn how to use it. It can be as simple or as advanced as you want it to be. To get the most out of it, you should learn to use the more advanced features, but there are plenty of people who just put it in automatic mode and fire the button.
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Old Mar 27, 2004, 10:50 AM   #3
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Do realize that it will be more than a few extra dollars. Unless you know that you'll be happy with only one or two lenses.

Of course, that flexability is a good thing, but it costs money too. Another advantage is that the lenses can be reused if you upgrade to another EOS-mount camera.

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Old Mar 27, 2004, 12:49 PM   #4
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If you are interested in the "inner workings" of photography, the Canon 300/Rebel is an excellent choice.

Unpack it, put a memory card in it (not - it won't come with one, not even the silly "three photos only" ones most cameras come with) and charge the battery. Set it to the green-square position and it's "Point and shoot".

Then start to try out some of the other settings. But in an emergency when Antie Flo wants a picture of her birthday cake or something, you can always go back to "green-square" if you don't know what might be better.

As you learn more, you can use the other "helper" modes for portrait, landscape, sports, etc. or you can take "full control" by going the other way up the dial for P, Ap/prio, Shut/prio, etc.

Don't try to master them all at once, take one new feature at a time.

Add in things like exposure lock, variable ISO settings, variable white-balance settings, esposure shift... there are LOTS of options and modes to play with and learn, with the good news that it costs you nothing to play coz you can shoot a whole card full of test pix, then throw them away and start over, without a penny going to Eastman Kodak! :-)

But you don't have to know any of that to get started.

I'd say it was *ideal* for a beginner who wants to learn and understand what's going on under the hood.

If you never care abotu what's going on under the hood, you're probably looking in teh wrong place.
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Old Mar 29, 2004, 11:25 AM   #5
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I think it comes down to a cost issue. I am a beginner, other than a photo class way back in high school, and I went for the 300D.

It is quite a bit of money though at $1,000 (since you are a beginner, don't even think about buying it without the kit lens. It is by far the best value)

I see a lot of post on her in the newbie section saying I want the best camera money, can buy for under $250 or I need a complete system for less than $323.92 (how they come up with a to the penny figure is beyond me)

Soooo, I must conclude that $1,000 is a lot of money for someone who wants to just go out and pick up a camera.

many on the forum will advise you to get a simple point and shoot and practice with that. Digital photography is not just about snapping pictures, you also have to get them out of the camera and process them for a suitable means of display. Sometimes that may be as simple as cropping and sometimes you have to get in there and change white balance, adjust curves, saturation, masking, sharpness and on and on.

Good luck with your decision.
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Old Mar 29, 2004, 12:08 PM   #6
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I think you could make a good case for buying almost any kind of camera as a beginner to digital photography.

But -- it's very important to get a camera that you will use, and want to use; because the only way you will improve as a photographer is to Take More Pictures. A camera that is easy to use and comfortable in your hands will get a lot of use, and you'll be very pleased at how quickly you learn about the camera.

The wonderful thing about digital is that the cost of film is minimal (nearly free if you don't save any of your pictures to CD :P ) because you can re-use that memory card thousands of times. Don't be afraid to experiment, to try creative things, to mess with settings. Except for pointing it at the sun, there aren't many things you can do that will hurt the camera. Each setting will teach you something.

A great "plus" about the 300D is that you can treat it as a point-and-shoot, play with the creative zone settings, or go full manual -- all with the advantage of having a real interchangeable-lens SLR. After a while, you will grow to use the camera's full potential. By then it may be time to upgrade to something that will allow you to grow further, or you may find the camera a perfect fit.

Canon has done a wonderful thing by making a very powerful camera available at a tolerable cost. It's clearly not for everyone, but it seems to have excited the passions of many people...
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Old Mar 29, 2004, 6:37 PM   #7
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Think of it this way. Kodak CX 4200-$129, then another Kodak $229, Kodak Dx6490-$499. Could have bought the 300D right off. I am selling all the above at a loss and am ordering a 300d.
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Old Mar 29, 2004, 8:27 PM   #8
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Default try canoga

I just bought mine it is due here tommorrw Try http://www.canogacameras.com they have the kit for 936 bucks + 11 bucks for UPS ground click on the specials button at the top of the page that the 300d is on and it will give you that price...70 buck cheaper than anyone else...especially here in tennessee I got out of a 9.5% sales tax..

Good Luck
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Old Apr 12, 2004, 10:50 AM   #9
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Default Re: try canoga

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chipperi
I just bought mine it is due here tommorrw Try http://www.canogacameras.com they have the kit for 936 bucks + 11 bucks for UPS ground click on the specials button at the top of the page that the 300d is on and it will give you that price...70 buck cheaper than anyone else...especially here in tennessee I got out of a 9.5% sales tax..

Good Luck
CHIP
I guess they are not doing this any longer no special and back to the normal price. I feel your pain about the Tennessee sales tax I lived there for years.
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Old Apr 18, 2004, 2:03 PM   #10
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Quote:
I read about the canon rebel, how awsome it is for the price the features ect. I have not read one bad review about it. The only thing is that alot of the features this camera has i would have no clue how they work But Im very keen on learning.

So I was thinking about spending the extra dollars and getting the rebel. Or should I start with somthing like the FZ10??Will I be wasting my money or can I learn to use all the features the camera has to offer.
Good question. I look at it this way: The value of the Digital Rebel is not in "all the feature", but in the basics -- SLR, the ability to use the full line of Canon and third-party lenses, and the quality of sensor and image processing. I strongly feel that the real value of this camera is not in the number of program modes or flash options or image processing options / etc. I in fact consider these to be noise that often lead to poorer pictures and less learning than otherwise.

I could go on, but I don't have the time, and you probably don't need a long lecture.

My final point is this: The original poster comes across as someone who really wants to learn. I think that the best way to learn is use such cameras in manual / semi-automatic mode -- the auto modes hide information and avoid learning. With automatic cameras, it can also be a struggle to get the camera to do what you want to manually. In this regard, the Rebel could still be more manual-friendly, but it certainly has enough to be fully manual. The fact that it has full and partial auto capabilities and an immediate digital preview feedback can make this learning process far easier, faster, and more successful than before.
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