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Old Apr 6, 2004, 4:27 PM   #1
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Default What lens for 10D?

Hello,

I have decided to go with 10D. Now, I find even the tougher choice to find a lenses compare to 10D or DRebel. I do not want to buy Canon L just yet but do not want waste on cheap stuff so looking somewhere in the middle like Canon 28-135 IS USM. For my use I want to get a good regular zoom and also telephoto zoom. My considerations so far is:
- it should be I/R focus - not the front ring;
- it should be FT-M so ring type USM for full manual control;

That comes to for regular zoom 24-85 USM, 28-105 II USM, 28-105 USM, 28-135 IS USM. For full zoom is 100-300 USM since 75-300 not FT-M. All are taken from Canon catalog. For some reason I am inclined and want all-Canon setup.

I also thinking, maybe it worth investing and pick 24-70L only and have it as everyday walk-around?

Any suggestions? Help would be greatly appreciated. I want to know am I on right track.

Thanks,
/Marius
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Old Apr 6, 2004, 8:03 PM   #2
Bui
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Marius, I have a 1n and I don't have the 10D yet, but I have used a number of Canon lens. Three years ago I bought a 28-135 IS and after 6 months I sold and replaced it with the 24-70L. After I have used the 24-70L I regretted I had not considered L lens before. And the 28-135IS is the middle of the road lens being made in Japan, not the plastic craps consumer quality sold as kit. Since then I bought another L lens, a 70-200F4. I don't use prime lens and cannot give opinion about them but heard users comment that non L prime lens are very good. I can only say cheap non L zooms are of awful quality. If you want Canon zoom lens, you cannot find better quality than L lens. They produce exceptional sharp images with beautiful saturated colors, especially with chrome 50 and 100 ISO films. I am sure you have heard about the wisdom coming from the pros, that if budget is limited, spend more money on high quality lens than on camera. Your 10D is a decent camera, certainly not a cheap consumer piece of equipment, it deserves better quality lens than all the craps you have listed. Invest in the 24-70L first and then a 70-200 L F2.8 or F4, IS or non-IS is up to you, they all produce super images and you won't be disappointed. Good luck with your decision.

Bill
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Old Apr 6, 2004, 11:12 PM   #3
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I think first of all you might post what you are going to use the lens for because that makes a huge difference. I could say that you should purchase a Canon 70-200 IS L but if you are using it for shooting something like basketball indoors then I'm not sure how much further ahead you would be with the huge price difference between the IS and non IS. However, if you were shooting wildlife and you need long mm's then a 70-200 in any character would be a bit less than needed, unless you considered a 2x converter. If you are shooting portraits then you probably need to look into a prime lens with an open aperture, such as a 135 L or a 100/2, which I personally own and have done some wonderful portraits with excellent bokeh.

What I'm saying is that one can't simply say, "What lens should I buy?" That's too general and nobody here, not even the experts, will be able to help you unless you get more specific in your desires.

Happy hunting
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Old Apr 7, 2004, 1:33 AM   #4
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Yup, decide what you want to take pictures of, then look at the lens that can help you there. It'll be rare that someone doesn't need or use a lens between 28-100 mm or so. Thus getting something decent in that range is typically a good investment. You can get a 50/1.8 for $70 (if you can find it in stores). This is an optically great lens. Its made out of plastic, thus breaks easy. The 28-135 is about the only non L canon lens I would recommend in that range zoom wise. Otherwise you'll have to spend 3 times more and get a 24-70L. There are other good lenses made by tamron and sigma in the 28-100 range, but I'm not familiar with them. Others in this forum are.

Barthold
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Old Apr 7, 2004, 2:47 AM   #5
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Would anyone mind telling which of Canon lenses you call "prime"? Those, not cheap and plastic? or there is more specific definition of prime lense so that one can tell prime form non-prime not only by exterior but by its features.

Thanks for replies they are helpful. Well, I guess most of us shoot wide variety of things - sports, wildlife, portraits, etc. I cannot say I will be only shooting sports so I tried to be generic and focus on things like quality at zooms, clear pictures and so on when selecting lense.

Thanks again,
/Marius
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Old Apr 7, 2004, 8:16 AM   #6
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A "prime" lens is a lens that is not a zoom. It only works at one focal length.

These are less complex and have few optical parts. This allows them to be (almost always) optically very good. You loose flexability, but gain optical quality.

As for build quality, they are usually well done. The exception might be the 50mm f1.8. Its plastic and I doubt it could take a beating. But then again, its really cheap (for a lens.) Around $60USD.

Eric
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Old Apr 7, 2004, 9:29 AM   #7
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You can talk about the 28-135 IS not being good all day, but when I saw a Pro who uses one with a D60 & a 10D & he showed me 24 X 30 Portrait enlargements that was convincing enough for me. This was AFTER I bought mine & that was when I first got my EOS 3 & was shooting prints & chromes. I have 3 - 16 X 20's recently done from a Pro Lab from my 300D that are Tack sharp using my 28-135 - all hand-held with the IS 'on'! If I were to get an 'L' Lens, use a tripod all the time, then there is no telling how big I could go. My next enlargements will be probably 20 X 24's - mainly to test the lenses.
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Old Apr 7, 2004, 10:22 AM   #8
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It pretty much depends how long you gonna to keep your lenses, if you have no intention of playing around and end up selling your lenses later, here are my lens list of suggestion for better results with your final photograghs, these lenses probably will last forever if you take good care of them, tremendous quality built and design, beautiful made (in Japan, of course)

Canon 16-35mm L F/2.8
Canon 24-70mm L F/2.8
Canon 70-200mm L F/2.8 IS or non IS
You can subtitute with the Sigma HSM 70-200 F/2.8 also
Canon 100mm F/2.8 macro

Oh, don't forget to get a quality multicoated filter for each one of them such as the Hoya pro1 or the B+W MC filters.

If money is the problem, save your money, and get one at a time...

Cheers
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Old Apr 7, 2004, 10:16 PM   #9
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If I were you, ie. using the 10D, I would not consider prime lens because of the need to change lens more often than zooms and this will aggravate the problem of dust on sensor. If budget is limited, I would try to buy L zooms for quality but compromise on lens speed (ie. slower):

17-40 L F4 (half price of 24-70 L but lighter, wider more necessary for the 10D due to the 1.6 factor) and later

70-200 L F4 (again half price of F2.8, lighter and except being one stop slower, quality image is the same)

These two lens would form the back bone of your equipment and you don't have to think about upgrading them later. But if you want to go to faster lens and prepare to carry heavier, bulkier lens, then that's fine, it's people choice.
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Old Apr 7, 2004, 10:52 PM   #10
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The bulkier and heavier factor don't concern me at all, in fact with the 10D they add more balance to handle the camera, especially when you add on the optional battery grip. You do get more benefits when buying faster lens, larger aperture lenses contribute a lot of weight to AF operation in low light, and in normal condition, it will focus faster also, it helps you to see better via brighter view-finder as compare to slower lens, but the main point is taken, you can only buy what you can afford, and pay for what you get, there is no free lunch.
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