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Old Apr 8, 2004, 2:47 AM   #1
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Default Question for 10D owners

I have a question for 10D owners, especially if you have a D-Rebel too.

I've been shooting with the D-Rebel for about 5 months now and am fairly familiar with it. There's a couple things that frustrate me and I'm wondering if the same is true of the 10D.

The first is the info displayed in the viewfinder. After a half-press of the shutter, the info is displayed for only 3 seconds unless I am actively changing a setting. I guess I just think too slow. I sure would like to keep the info on for 10 seconds or so while I compose or wait for lighting changes.

I also like to stitch panoramas so when shooting I need to pan the whole field of view while watching the meter (manual mode) to find an average setting for all the shots. The info always goes away too soon. I know its only a half-press away but sometimes it is awkward, especially when using a tripod.

I would also like to see more information in the viewfinder such as shooting mode, drive mode and ISO.

What say you 10-D owners? Does your camera have these things?

Thanks a bunch for your answers!

David Youtz
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Old Apr 8, 2004, 6:13 AM   #2
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Default Re: Question for 10D owners

Quote:
Originally Posted by Amateur
The first is the info displayed in the viewfinder. After a half-press of the shutter, the info is displayed for only 3 seconds unless I am actively changing a setting. I guess I just think too slow. I sure would like to keep the info on for 10 seconds or so while I compose or wait for lighting changes.
You can keep the shutter 1/2 press, ie don't release your finger pressure if you wan the display to stay on longer. The 10D is the same here, may be the rear thumbwheel let you do this better without releasing the pressure from the shutter button...

For panoramas you want to flip the wheel to manual this way there's no change in exposure.
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Old Apr 8, 2004, 5:20 PM   #3
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Thanks NHL,

still curious about the other info.
Does the 10D show shooting mode, ISO or drive mode in the viewfinder?

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Old Apr 8, 2004, 10:21 PM   #4
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No, there is no ISO, shooting mode or drive mode. I would love it if ISO was there, even if it only flashed briefly. I never change drive mode and rarely change shooting mode... so those interest me less.

Eric
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Old Apr 8, 2004, 10:44 PM   #5
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thanks Eric
I agree -- ISO is the main one.
For me, it's not unusual to forget to switch back to single-shot after using the RC-1 which operates the cam in timer mode.

Can't say I've missed any important shots though. I don't wait the 10 seconds, rather I power off and on then switch to singleshot. It's about 3 seconds faster-- haha.

The shooting mode is not really that important either, I don't always check it when I pull my camera out and sometimes it has been bumped to another setting.

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Old Apr 9, 2004, 7:20 AM   #6
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Ah, yes.... I've made that mistake a few times. Not often, but I've tried a few shots with mirror lockup and a 5 second timer (or whatever the shorter timer is.) But I seem to recall that the next day I forgot that I set that. So it would have been handy.

But ISO would be killer, ya.

Eric
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Old Apr 9, 2004, 2:10 PM   #7
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That's what I like about EVF based cameras like the A1/A2... Everything is shown in the viewfinder including color coded icons, actual real-time histogram of the scene, as well as "true" image of what's going to be stored to the flash cards in the camera's WYSIWYG mode.

No review is necessary... you gain some with the optical viewfinder, but you also lose some: What you see in the optical viewfinder is not necessarily what get stored on the memory card!
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Old Apr 9, 2004, 5:18 PM   #8
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I held an A2 in my hands today in Costco. Quite compact

No power though, so I couldn't check the EVF.

From what I read it sounds like the EVF has reached a point where those used to optical viewfinders can be satisfied.

However, in choosing a replacement for my stolen E-10 it was the mostly the smooth low noise images that tipped the scales in favor of the D-Rebel. The A1 was Minolta's offering at the time. Those were the only two contenders for me. (I liked the 10D and the E-1 but $$)

I think I would like an EVF if I could focus with it and it was fluid enough. Ever since I hit 40 my eyes have gone downhill. Been doing more computer work since that time too.

I've been using drug store reading glasses for the last couple years. I must be an amusing sight as I take them off to look in the viewfinder, then put them on to look at the camera settings -- on off - on - off - on . . .

Of course I can set the diopter for my glasses but then I have to wear them all the time; that feels like surrendering.

Good points on the EVF NHL

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Old Apr 10, 2004, 5:29 AM   #9
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I'm the more practical type. I already have a 10D and seriously considering the A2 which is a much improved version of their D7's which I still like very much. I played with the A2 several times and IMO its AF is amazingly fast and as to the noise I rarely shoot anything above ISO100. If I (or you) do the 10D (or the Digital Rebel) will take care of it!

The thing to consider is its size and weight for practicality: with a 28-200mm you're guaranteed to carry at least two lenses with another non full-frame dSLR and the need for changing lens in the field at the risk for contamination, and just the pain in the behind to have to do it at all and miss a shot. The entire A1/A2 camera weights less than the 10D body alone!

Aren't all this photography stuff supposed to be fun and not turning it into an assignment or costly investments?

The A2's EVF from Steve's review
(with everything turn on):
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Old Apr 10, 2004, 8:43 AM   #10
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NHL, it amaze me that until now you haven't own the new Minolta A2, knowing you 're the fan of the D7. It's absolutely a small miracle machine.

I've held all of five new 8 megapix digicams in my hand and played with all of them from time to time, the Sony DSC-F828, Canon Proshot Pro1, minolta A2, Nikon Coolpix 8700 and the amazing Olympus C8080, The Nikon 8700 is my least favorite. I now own the Sony and the Canon, but the Olympus is propably my most favorite camera (if I have not buy the other two, I definitely will buy this one for sure), feel so good in my hand with everthing function the way I thinhk they should, I probably will have to do something stupid very soon, it's a hobby all right, but more than that, it's like a passion to me...
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