Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Canon EOS dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old May 1, 2004, 12:42 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 15
Default Lens Hood and other Question

Hi, Sorry for these newbie questions. I have the 300D and bought the Tamron 28-75 f2.8 lens and I'm working on taking shots of indoor volleyball. I have a couple items I'm not sure about. I'm not using a flash and using ISO 1600.

The Tamron Lens came with a lens hood, is it appropriate to use this for indoor photography or is it more for outdoor use?

Most of the pictures I've been taking so far I've been using the Continuous shoot mode, is there any drawback to using this mode all the time.

So far I have been hand holding the camera, if I'm able to get shutter speeds of over 1/250, does it make sense to use a monopod?
Thanks, keith
KeithofHB is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old May 2, 2004, 12:10 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 332
Default

Keith - I use the hood on my Tamron 28-300 outdoors to eliminate lens flare caused by the sun. You can use it indoors if you want to look like a BSD (Big Swinging ....Doughnut). Actually, I don't know of any use indoors for the hood, but that doesn't mean there isn't one - perhaps someone else has a take on that. If you are getting the shots you want handheld (especially for action sports shot) great! I wouldn't use a mono-pod unless your result are mediocre. Try blowing a HH shot up in post production and see if its blurred or soft. I hope this help.
fporch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 2, 2004, 9:29 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 5,803
Default

My answer looks to have been lost in the transition.

The lens hood is good whenever you think there will be light sources near where you are pointing the camera. They block stray light from coming in and bouncing around... producing lens flare. If you think you'll be pointing the lens at a window letting in light, or towards one of the lights in the gym, then use the hood. Personally, its just more hassle to take off (and potentially loose) so I always keep it on.

I always shoot in continuous drive mode. It does not cause any problems that I know of.

It always makes sense to use a monopod if you can. 1/250 should be good at 75mm, so in that respect you can get away with it.

Eric
eric s is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 2, 2004, 10:13 PM   #4
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 15
Default

Thanks for the replies, I'll continue to use my lens hood in the gym. It looks cool anyway!

Many of my pictures are not tack sharp so that's why I was wondering about the monopod. I'm thinking it may be the ISO 1600 too. I posted some of my pictures here: http://www.pbase.com/keithofhb/volleyball

keith
KeithofHB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 2, 2004, 11:11 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 5,803
Default

You were able to stop the hands in motion, so that makes me think that shutter speed is good.

I believe you are right, the problem is the 1600ISO. That will replace good pixels with noise that will obscure detail.

Eric
eric s is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 4, 2004, 8:30 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 6,483
Default

I use two lenses with pretty hood sized front elements. They came with lens hoods. I mount them indoors for protection. Much cheaper to bang a hood into a wall or piece of furniture than the front element of your lens.
Greg Chappell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 4, 2004, 6:14 PM   #7
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 15
Default

I took a look at your shots, mostly because I'm thinking of buying a Rebel. I must say that for ISO1600 there really does seem to be remarkably little noise. I would be buying for sports too (outside, though) and I am thinking Rebel over prosumer P&S mostly because of the noise factor at 400 and above on the Pro1 or Minolta A2. Your 1600 shots convinced me.

As to your photos, have you tried bumping up the sharpening in the custom settings? Are you getting a good focus lock? Is the Tamrom lens otherwise sharp? Just some random thoughts 'cause your shutter speed looks OK.
abergfeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 5, 2004, 7:23 AM   #8
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 27
Default

I have a D300. Before you buy one strictly for sports be aware that AI servo on this camera doesn't always work!!!! This isn't a deal breaker for me as I do mostly baseball in the sports area, but if you are doing something where the action changes constantly you may have an issue that makes you wish you had the 10D.
FSUScotsman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 5, 2004, 7:26 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
Setiprime's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 484
Default

I nearly always use a lens hood - for lens protection if nothing else.

Outdoors, even on cloudy days, you can get stray reflections/refractions from indirect sources, and can ruin an otherwise good shot. Indoors, those stadium lights can do you in even if they don't show up in your viewfinder. Always a good idea to use it.

I shot several SCCA races over the weekend, and used "continuous" most of the time. Granted you have to wait for the buffer to unload, but a sequence can get you that ONE critical shot. You ain't gonna wear the camera out, I guarantee it !
Setiprime is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 5, 2004, 11:35 AM   #10
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 15
Default

FSUScotsman wrote:
Quote:
I have a D300. Before you buy one strictly for sports be aware that AI servo on this camera doesn't always work!!!! This isn't a deal breaker for me as I do mostly baseball in the sports area, but if you are doing something where the action changes constantly you may have an issue that makes you wish you had the 10D.

I want to make sure I understand. When you say "AI servo" are you talking about the camera's ability to switch from one shot to continuous focus? I suppose the remedy for that would be to go to the "sports scene" mode at the loss of manual control or switch to manual focus, pick a zone and wait for action to come to you (auto racing for example). My use would be primarily swimming and diving, Soccer Dad photos and auto racing. If the Auto focus failed me, manual would probably work for all but soccer. I'm leaning toward the Rebel only because I have a Canon A2e now and would be able to use my 28-105 and 100-300 lenses.
abergfeld is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 9:25 PM.