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Old May 13, 2004, 11:06 PM   #11
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Sounds like you could use a reall good macro lens for the business side of the world. Canon and Sigma both make very good ones. Its hard to go wrong with any of the Macro lenses that Canon makes (well, other than price, they are expensive, but wow are they good.)

Do tell us what flash you got (make & model) and we can help you with how good that choice is for what you'll do. If the pictures you'll take of the stone is really macro work, having a good lighting setup is really important. You need LOTS of light to make that work. Not just flashes, but quality lights on stands to light the subject.

Getting prints to match what you took is not easy, but isn't that hard either. It's much more of a question of getting your monitor to display the proper colors, and have a profile for the color output for the printers your advertising company uses. Then you know what what you see on your screen should be exactly what they produce in the ad. If you want, I can go into this.

Eric
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Old May 14, 2004, 4:09 PM   #12
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Hi Eric

I picked up my flash today. It is a Canon Speedlite 550EX. Its a monster. All computerized and stuff. I havent even put it on the camera yet. Good thing I have drop protection on the camera and all the accessories. This camera is going to weigh more than me soon!

:|


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Old May 15, 2004, 2:12 PM   #13
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Well, in that situation the salesman didn't stear you wrong. The 550EX is a very good flash. I've got one and love it. It is a beast, but it's the most flexable of the Canon line. And if you ever start to need more flashes (which you might for your work shots) you can use the 550EX as the master for a multi-flash wireless flash setup. If you get others, though, I would recommend the 440EX (the model one lower.) If all it's going to be is a slave flash, you don't need all the features or power of the 550EX. But that is a ways down the line for you.

You can get non-OEM flashes (from sigma, sunpack, & others) that have similar features and flash power for less money. I've heard some people have problems with them (always slightly over or under do the flash) but I've heard from others who love their non-OEM flash and get great results. I'm sure some has to do with the person's expectations and how much of a perfectionist they are (I'm a bit too much of one myself.)

I just wanted to comment on what Madwand said in that other thread. (Note that this is from memory, so maybe I'm softening his words some?) I think you're taking it worse than it was intended. Most of what he said was right. You did buy more camera than you can handle. But if you're willing to learn and grow into it, then you will be very happy with your choice. For 35-mm/DSLR type cameras, there is almost nothing better (the Canon 1Ds is better for some things and is close to twice that price.) But you could have purchased something much cheaper andlearned the ropes... made sure you liked photography and understood what you wanted to do with it (more specific than the list you gave before) and then gone out and laid out the big bucks. Now, if you are right, and you want to do photography and have high standards then you did the right thing. If in a year you find that it isn't what you want.. look me up, and I'll buy that body off you! Oopp, where was I. If you were wrong, you made an expensive mistake. Very expensive. Some people are willing to take that risk, others are not.

Eric
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Old May 16, 2004, 5:19 PM   #14
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Well you may be right, I did take what Madwand said probably harsher than it was intended.

I enjoy taking pictures, this I know. When I decided I wanted to take it up as a hobby, my outlook was this: Start with the best, learn on the best, and that is how I will get the most out of my money. I am a business woman. I always try and buy the best. I feel it is a better investment. If it doesnt work for some reason, chances are I wont loose that much money on a resell. I have invested over $7,500 on this Canon 1d Mark II system with a lens, flash, memory and warranty. This is my call, all I was asking was a little support to make sureI made goodchoices with my accessories, not to be criticized on my level of experience. Maybe I didnt make that understood in my post. Anyways......

Great, well I'm glad you like this flash I have. Its pretty awesome. I go back to class next week. I have to find out why my action shots are blurry. The salesman said the flash would help with that, which is has, instead of 8 out of 10 shot blurry, only about 2 outta 10 are. I'm sure there is a logical answer.

Thanks again Eric:-)




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Old May 16, 2004, 6:40 PM   #15
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I could tell you about the blury flash shots if you want, but the interactivenature of classes might work better for you.

The reason is simple, the answer is hard. You don't have enough shutter speed but the answer is situational.

Using a higher ISO setting will get you a higher shutter speed. The trade off is noisein the picture but the 1D Mark II has less noise at the higher ISOs than most cameras, so you might be able to go fairly high.

Larger aperture. This is partly why f2.8 lenses are more valuable 'cause they allow in more light, and therefor a higher shutter speed. Of course, the added materials required to build the lenses with the larger aperture raises the cost.

Add more light (use the flash.) Flashes have a surprisingly short range. The 550EX, in my experience, starts to really be ineffective beyond about 20-30 feet or so. But if you crank up the ISO it goes further. There is a calculation which governs this called the "guide number". You'llsee a table in the back of the 550EX manual that shows you what the guide number is at different settings. There is a formula which demonstrates how to go from guide number to distance and shutter speed, but honestly I don't know it. I should...

That is the quick discription. I can say more on this if you want. I take nature shots outdoors... action shots of animals as taught me a bit about how to get sharp pictures.

Eric
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Old Jun 4, 2004, 2:20 PM   #16
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Numbersqueen;

One small piece of advicefrom someone who is still learning the hobby; be patient.

It takes time, for me anyway, for all of this information to sink in to my thick skull, and some days I get frustrated with it when the pictures don't come out right. However, I'm always ready to admit that I've made a mistake, do a bit of research, then go back and try it again. Since purchasing my 10D six months ago, I can really see the difference in my photographic skills.

You have an awesome camera and flash combination that should do just about whatever you want. It just might take some time and patience to get to where you want to be.

Best of luck

Envious Barticus

http://image.pbase.com/u45/barticus/....Festival5.jpg


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Old Jun 4, 2004, 6:18 PM   #17
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Can the 1D MKII do 8 fps with the mirror locked up?? that would be nice for astrophotos.

dennis
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Old Jun 13, 2004, 2:57 PM   #18
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Thanks Barticus, believe it or not, I have learned so much in the last couple of months. I have taken almost 1,000 pictures on my new 1d Mark II. I purchased a 2 gig CF chip so I can take up to almost 400 pics at a shot if I want!! (That doesn't happen much) I also have been taken some photography classes. I now understand more about how and whydifferent funchtions work. Still having problems with blurred pictures. Sometimes they just aren't as crisp as I would like them. But, I am enjoying it. I just wish I had more time to devote to my new hobby!!

Thanks for everyone's advise and patience.




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Old Jun 13, 2004, 3:28 PM   #19
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just got my DII a few days ago in Copehagen.

I have been an avid photographer for years, but now retired, I have decided to challenge myself by switching to digital photography.

Man, - is there a lot to learn!

Sofar I only have praise for the mkII
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Old Jun 14, 2004, 8:21 AM   #20
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numbersqueen,

The blurry pictures might just be the camera. A popular complaint about the camera is that canon designed it to produce blury pictures (to reduce aliasing patterns. Its caused by the anti-alias filter.)

From what I understand, the pictures are supposed to sharpen up VERY WELL in photoshop. So while this is an annoyance, you can correct it fairly easy.

So while some blurry pictures might be you (not enough shutter speed) they might not all be you.

Glad to hear that you like the camera and are learning so much. Damn, now I can't buy it off you cheap.

Eric
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