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Old May 18, 2004, 7:57 AM   #11
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Hey, once isn't "numerous"!:-)

But personally, my vote is with you on this one. Get the Sigma and try it out. If you find you have problems with it, return it and get the Canon. Its so much cheaper that its worth the risk. Just make sure you get it from some place that accepts no hassle returns, and that you actually "try it out" and look serious at the results.

Eric
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Old May 18, 2004, 8:38 AM   #12
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OK, twice then!

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...&highlight=FEL

:-)
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Old May 18, 2004, 9:46 PM   #13
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But my point still stands. The people were not having the problem with the DRebel.

I don't claim to understand (and I wasn't there to see the problems) so I don't know if I should trust them or not. This why I say "I've read"... trying to imply this isn't from personal experience. I certainly don't know enough about camera to flash to camera communcation to know if the camera really cares a hoot about the type of flash or not.

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Old May 19, 2004, 9:00 AM   #14
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Eric

You "assume" the DRebel... I always refer to Canon's flash metering in general which is at issue, and why most folks "assumed" Nikon flash system is "better", until E-TTL II that is which factors in the distance info from the lens as well. Yes my 10D has the same issue and yours too! (BTW Minolta always has it, they called it ADI, for Advance Distance Integration)

The truth is the system works very well in 90% of the cases; however, in difficult lighting situation like when you shoot a bride wearing a white dress for example: the camera will bias its metering on the focus point which is good, but in this case overwhelming bright creating an underexposed shot by cutting down on the flash output (regardless of flash brand). If you were to focus on the groom you'll end up with the opposite effect, ie overexposed because the camera flash metering tried to compensate for the subject darker tux by delaying the cut-off to the flash increasing the exposure time!

When the camera factor in the distance, just like a person taking the Guide Number of the flash and divides by the distance manually to set the camera, the exposure is always correct regardless of the subject EV. This is not to say that the distance method is better, it's not, it doesn't work for fill-in for example...

The main criteria for selecting a flash is often very simple: how even the lighting is, ie no hotspot or fall-off at the periphery... Under/over exposure is usually associated with the camera's metering (or user's skills).
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Old May 19, 2004, 4:46 PM   #15
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Ahh, I see my problem. When you said "Canon default metering" I some how read that to mean that the camera switches to that when using the flash. The only canon body thatI know of that switches metering mode without you saying to do it is the DRebel. My fault.

I agree that the problems that I heard about could be user error. What you describe would easily produce a different metering that they might have wanted... and they might have blamed the flash instead of themselves (incorrect place to meter off of.)

But as I said before, that doesn't explain why the problem went away when they changed brands of flash (assuming everything else is equal.) My assertion is that I don't believe user error is to blame for all of them. I could be wrong. Not argument will diswade that statement, except interviewing everyone who has posted a complaint about switching from brand X to brand Y of flash and seen the exposure improve. If I'd only seen one or two, I could say they didn't realize they changed technique or subjects enough that the fix was not the new flash, but the new environment/method. But I've read well over 10 of them over a variety of forums.

We both agree that usmc325 should try the Sigma flash (assuming it has the features he cares about)and see if it works for him. If he gets good results, then it doesn't matter what problems others have had... I just wanted to mention that I've heard of others who have had a problem.

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Old May 19, 2004, 9:55 PM   #16
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To argue in favor of the Sigma, I have had it for a couple months, and it hasn't let me down yet.

However, I am using it on my 10D, and it may perform differently on a Rebel.

I have also used a 420EX on my camera, and have not noticed a difference in exposure between the two. I would note however, that the majority of the subjectsI have hit with flash have been 15-40 ft away. Problems might have occurred closer or further than that!:shock:
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Old Sep 23, 2004, 2:44 PM   #17
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NHL wrote:
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BTW if anyone is thinking about using a Canon Off Camera Shoe Cord 2, forget it! This remote cord doesn't apply to the digital EOS it will just force your flash to be compatible with the older "B" bodies...
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NHL,
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Is this from personal experience? I just ordered a Sigma EF 500 DG Super, flip flash bracket, and Canon Off Camera Shoe Cord 2. I read elsewhere that as long as I bought the "#2" cord (vs the "#1" cord) it would work fine. I am shooting a wedding in a couple of weeks, and need a solution that get's the flash off of the hotshoe on my DReb...Any suggestions? How do other wedding photographers get their E-TTL flashes off camera?
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Old Sep 24, 2004, 8:45 AM   #18
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You've to try...

I have the Off-Camera Shoe Adapter OA2 and TTL Hot Shoe Adapter 3 with the connecting cord giving the same electrical connectivity but this combination only works on film and not on the dSLRs like the 10D with the pre-flash.
-> I use two(or more) flashes with the output on the main unit mounted on the hotshoe disabled, ie it only serves as a master controller and do not contribute to the lighting. No cord is required this way, and everything is wireless

A dedicated ST-E2 wireless remote controller is probably smaller, but cost as much as the EF500DG Super itself, so I decide to go with the Sigma's instead for the same functionality :-)
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Old Sep 25, 2004, 4:10 AM   #19
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what is the difference between the sigma and the canon flashes in price? It would probably be different here in Australia but the canon products always seem more expensive, you get what you pay for though and Ive never heard anyone complain about their flash units.

This converstation is very interesting for me as I am thinking of getting a flash unit for my Drebel. I dont mind paying more if it is worth it the money.
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Old Sep 25, 2004, 6:55 AM   #20
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aladyforty wrote:
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what is the difference between the sigma and the canon flashes in price? It would probably be different here in Australia but the canon products always seem more expensive... I dont mind paying more if it is worth it the money
There's just no comparison between the 420EX to the similar priced Sigma's EF500DG Super:
o Guide Number (in meter): 42 vs 50 for the Sigma
o Manual overide: Not on the 420EX - Fully adjustable on the EF500
o Exposure compensation: None on the 420EX - 1/3 stop increment up to 3-stops on the Sigma
o Flash Bracketing: Zip on the 420EX - again 1/3 to 3-stop on the EF500
o 2nd shutter sync: Again nada on the 420EX but selectable on the Sigma's flash
o The 420EX is a slave only, the Sigma is both Master and Slave (and can also be slaved to studio strobes)

You can get all the above features back (except the slave to studio strobe part) on the now discontinued 550EX, but at almost twice the price! The just released 580EX costs a bit more still...
which is OK until you realize you need to buy several heads for a multi master-slaves set up! :?
... or slaved to a macro flash: http://www.sigmaphoto.com/Html/pages/EM140_DG.htm
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