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Old Jun 10, 2004, 3:51 PM   #1
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What parameter do you folks usually shoot at ... and why? I am finding adobe seems to give me the best skin tone renditions as a default....
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Old Jun 10, 2004, 4:05 PM   #2
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I shoot at Adobe RGB and RAW format. Why? Because it doesn't alter the image that I have in mind and allows me to sharpen, saturate, and adjust as I see fit, not the camera. Adobe RGB gives me the widest gamut of colors available for my camera.
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Old Jun 10, 2004, 4:16 PM   #3
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Ohenry,

You are also using the 300D/Rebel right?

I've noticed some very odd color casting in everything I shot in the last few days regardless of lens or filter I had on the camera. Either an orange or green shift that is really begining to bother me....

Sample of my lil' guy flipping me the bird..... EXIF below.

1/200th handheld with flash f/8



File Name
IMG_9210.JPG
Camera Model Name
Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL
Shooting Date/Time
6/12/2004 12:42:08 PM
Shooting Mode
Manual
Tv( Shutter Speed )
1/200
Av( Aperture Value )
8.0
Metering Mode
Center-weighted averaging
ISO Speed
100
Lens
28.0 - 75.0 mm
Focal Length
75.0 mm
Image Size
3072x2048
Image Quality
Fine
Flash
On
Flash Type
Built-In Flash
Flash Exposure Compensation
0
Red-eye Reduction
Off
Shutter curtain sync
1st-curtain sync
White Balance
Auto
AF Mode
One-Shot AF
Parameters
Contrast +1
Sharpness +1
Color saturation +1<-Shouldnt make THIS much diff. should it??
Color tone Normal
Color Space
sRGB
File Size
1700KB
File Number
192-9210
Drive Mode
Single-frame shooting

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Old Jun 10, 2004, 4:56 PM   #4
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Auto white balance works well in most cases, but slight variances in color temperature of the lighting will cause slight color shifts. Artificial light will give you the most trouble. The only control you have over color casts during the shot making process is white balance. If you're doing a lot of shots under the exact same lighting conditions, a custom white balance may help. You can try adjusting your white balance to the presets, but auto will probably give you the best results on average. Obviously, you want to get your shot as close to being correct as possible PRIOR to any photoshop work, so if you're going to shoot jpg, you need to find what parameters work best for your camera and your tastes. You used flash in the picture provided. Have you experimented with setting your white balance to the flash setting?

I don't do custom white balance (I shoot RAW and wb is a post processing step for me) but others here have some experience with doing that and will probably offer some advice. Even after I set my WB in RAW processing, when I do my corrections in Photoshop, one of the first steps that I take is to correct for any color casts. Often it is a very slight adjustment, but sometimes it is more predominant.

Filters and lenses also play a role in color casts but there isn't much you can do about your lens. Which filters do you routinely use on your lens? Often people use various filters for "protection" and if they're not optically clear glass, they may introduce slight color shifts.

Hope this gives you some ideas to work with.
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Old Jun 10, 2004, 5:23 PM   #5
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Thanks for the feeback ohenry.

Generally I also shoot raw but this seems to appearing more and more regardless of raw or jpg. I also have experimented w/various white balance presets and custom also. I am begining to think its possibly the flash that is acting up since in natural light the casts correspond to the hues of the light illuminating the scene. However the flash seems to be the source of much odd coloring. I generally use Hoya Skylight filters which are reasonably clear. But with about 50 tests I shot with and without a filter and also across 3 lenses (28-70L, 28-75 XR, 18-55) the color shift is present in all ... most significantly in flash work ... I will try another series with the Super DG and see if it also present to rule out the onboard flash ... Hope its something obvious I am overlooking and dont have to send in the camera to service




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Old Jun 10, 2004, 5:46 PM   #6
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I would point my finger at the skylight filter, but you say that the color shift exists with and without the filter and is not limited to just one lens. From the sounds of things, the flash output may be the source of the variances. Do you also notice it when using available light?

To be honest, the picture you provided looks typical of many flash shots. Remember that the flash is only part of the picture. What other light sources are present at the time of the shoot? Tungsten bulbs will give you an orange cast. Flourescent would tend to give green.
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Old Jun 28, 2004, 10:39 PM   #7
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I use Set 1 (changed saturation +1 and sharpness +1)


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