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Old Jun 30, 2004, 10:50 AM   #1
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What are some settings to get good shots of people. I have the DRebel, 5000dg flash. I havethe Tamron 28-70, Canon 50mm f1.8, and the kit lense. What are your suggestions for photos of people. How do you get flattering pictures? Do you use bonce flash often?

Thanks for the info
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Old Jun 30, 2004, 4:43 PM   #2
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If you can get Kalypsoor Frank Doorhofto answer your question, you're in good hands. They both do some very good shots of people.

My guess is that bound flash is almost always require. Probably with an umbrella. The focal lengths that you list seem reasonabl for portrate work.

Beyond that, I have no experience.

Eric
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Old Jun 30, 2004, 6:00 PM   #3
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If you're going to rely on a single flash unit to provide the lighting for you subjects, invest in an inexpensive Lumedyne Bounce System. It will provide a softer bounce light and minimize the harsh shadows of direct lighting.
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Old Jun 30, 2004, 9:46 PM   #4
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You could always use fill flash depending upon the circumstances. Bounce is great, but it all depends upon the indoor ceiling colour, distance, etc..

Use some sort of diffuser on your flash. You can make one easily by cutting out white cardboard and using an elastic to attach to the flash. Cheapest solution, and it works great. You then move the flash head up at an angle so the light bounces off the cardboard stock onto your subjects. You can buy one as well...lots of options here.

Hmmm...most people who do formal portraitphotography usually use a lens in the 80-100mm range. many pref ere a soft effect to hide wrinkles in their subjects as well. There are 2 options open to you if this is what you want to play around with. You can do it the traditional way by buying a special soft focus filter and/or make one using a skylight/UV filter and some Vaseline smeared on it. Or you can do some blurring in your post processing software.

Just some suggestions and ideas.




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Old Jul 1, 2004, 9:43 AM   #5
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These guys are taking off in another direction, I think.

I read your topic as CANDID shots of people.

For that you need a good long lens and wear unobtrusive clothing. You try NOT to be outstanding in a crowd. Pick angles that will provide the expression on faces you are looking for.

Outdoor events are a great beginning. Fairs, Art/Craft shows. Spectators at a sports event, etc.

Try working a family picnic or birthday party and remember what the situaton was when you took the shot.

A flash is an absolute NO. People see one flash and they are aware and no longer in a truly candid situation -

If they are in a public place, technically they are fair game. HOWEVER- if you sell or publish their photo without a model release - you are 'dead meat' !!


Good Shooting

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Old Jul 1, 2004, 10:50 AM   #6
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Actually both answers help. I really meant pictures of people outside of studio work. I thought you guys would be able to adopt some of your ideas to outside the studio So know about the flash options was useful for just shooting pictures of people and the candid info was great also. Any other info to know angels? is 50mm or 80mm better to use or is any zoom OK? I'm kind of short 5' 4" so I feel my people shots are not as good becuase I'm shorter then they are . Even if shots are not candid I have had good luck just getting people to smile or laugh then taking the picture.

Thanks again for the info I hope this helps others as well. Maybe I'll venture into semi studio .
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Old Jul 1, 2004, 11:57 AM   #7
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Be creative. Try different lenses with different angles. Play with perspectives, and try to tell a story.
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Old Jul 2, 2004, 10:39 AM   #8
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Chako is right-

The experimentation is half the thrill !!

I ALWAYS look for the different angle.

Steps are super, escalators, stand on a park bench, etc.

If you are looking at a slight downward angle the viewer mentally gets a feeling of their power. The reverse is true also - ever notice how often important figures at a function, are shot at a slight upward angle ?? It increases the viewers impression of how important and/or powerful the message.

Sideward glances from someone can reveal a whole lot about their mood, raised eye brows, a frown of concentration (ball games) etc,etc.

Shoot with your gut reaction cause that is what makes it YOU !
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Old Jul 8, 2004, 12:36 AM   #9
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My advice is: don't be sneaky. I use a 20mm f/1.8. Let the people see you have a camera. If they don't want to be photographed, they'll get out of you way. After a while, they'll forget about the camera and you can get some nice candids pretty close.
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