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Old Jul 19, 2004, 7:46 AM   #1
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I bite the bullet and purchased a DSLR. I bought the camera with the lens kit. My first few pictures are underexposed, both indoors and outdoors. I bumped up the ISO to 800 for the indoor shots. This improved the pictures to where the exposure is perfect. I tried ISO 400 for the outdoor shots, but they still look underexposed. I also tried some post-processing with PE2, but some slight improved. I'm thinking about returning the camera. Does this sound like an issue with the camera or lens, or is this what I should expect from this camera?
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Old Jul 19, 2004, 8:58 AM   #2
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Can you post some sample pictures and included the EXIF data.
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Old Jul 19, 2004, 2:30 PM   #3
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Bob-

Try a couple of things that might change your exposure.

Set white balance to AWB (just for openers)

set your focus point to the center spot.

set your mode dial to "Av"

dial in a shutter speed faster than 1/30

pick a shot that isn't too dark or too light

Don't go by what you see in the LCD !!

The Rebel had a tendancy to under expose if there is a lot of daylight in the shot.

And slightly overexpose if the opposite situation exists.

Also try to pick a fairly bright location. I generally shoot most of my stuff in ISO 200, but 400 works very nicely too.

get back with us will ya ??

Startup is all part of the experience !!
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Old Jul 19, 2004, 8:35 PM   #4
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Here are a few pictures that I've slected to show the underexposed pictures. Most of the problems, like I said, are with my outdoor shots. These were all taken in P mode with only adjustments to the ISO. Your opinions and suggestions are welcome.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"http://bobshell.smugmug.com

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Old Jul 19, 2004, 8:52 PM   #5
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Your outdoor shots are underexposed due to the large expanse of bright background. Exposure is based on the scene being basically neutral. Particularly bright or dark areas may fool the meter, depending on the mode of metering and area covered. Since you used P mode, I will assume that Canon's evaluative metering system determined your exposure. Evaluative metering is a relatively complex set of algorithyms used to determine the exposure. It works well about 90% of the time, but there are times that you will want to compensate the setting. I suggest that you read up on exposure, then experiment with the camera. A good source of information can be found at http://www.photo.net/making-photographs/exposureand http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...exposure.shtml.

Adjusting the ISO to obtain exposure is a unique ability of digital since it can be adjusted on the fly. The preferred method is to use the lowest possible ISO that will allow you to obtain proper exposure using the aperture and shutter speed settings. You can add or subtract exposure using your exposure compensation in your camera. I might suggest that you try using the bracketing feature in your camera to learn more about exposure compensation and examining the results. As said, the LCD screen on the camera is not a viable indication of results. The histogram feature will teach you much more. Here's some helpful information on histogrrams: http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...stograms.shtml

Good luck and happy shooting.
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Old Jul 19, 2004, 10:56 PM   #6
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There's also another possible explanation (from the rocky beach to the groups of people)... Judging from the projected shadows you're also shooting against the sun.

If the pictures were taken on the opposite side (with the sun in the back of the photographer), they would come out slightly better (the young lady on the beach is positioned correctly)

BTW the indoor picture looks just fine... so it's not the camera. :idea:
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Old Jul 20, 2004, 1:08 PM   #7
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Thanks to everyone for the tips and suggestions. Thanks to ohenry for the websites. There's a lot I need to learn.
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